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Bend, Oregon: Full Rotation Farms, a successful urban farming operation created a year ago

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For eight months last year, Curtis worked six days a week, he said, and during peak season, he worked 12-hour days for six straight weeks.

By Ronnie Wilde
The Bulletin
Apr 4, 2017

Excerpt:

Though there are other urban farmers in the region, what makes Curtis’ approach unique is that he does not own the land he uses. He farms in other people’s yards. With the blessing of participating homeowners, Curtis cultivates lawns, gardens and unused land and turns those spaces into productive food-producing plots. In 2016, he utilized three yards on the Westside of Bend, and was feeding 13 Full Rotation Farms member families by April 15. By June, he was in peak season, and continued to supply vegetables through December.

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April 11, 2017   Comments Off on Bend, Oregon: Full Rotation Farms, a successful urban farming operation created a year ago

2 East Bay companies redefine urban farming

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Benjamin Fahrer at work at the Top Leaf Farms location on the roof of 2201 Dwight Way in Berkeley. Photo: Alix Wall.

Oakland Farms: While vertical towers are a new fad in urban agriculture, Oakland engineer John Wichmann has built one of his own design that he believes is better than any on the market.

Excerpt:

The larger of the two operations is Top Leaf Farms, a rooftop garden at 2201 Dwight Way in Berkeley. The building, which was built by the Oakland-based Nautilus Group, Inc., is called Garden Village and functions as student housing for UC Berkeley. It was completed in January 2015 and Top Leaf began installing its garden in August 2016. By October it was up and running, growing produce in 10,000 of its 12,000 square feet of space.

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April 11, 2017   Comments Off on 2 East Bay companies redefine urban farming

How one South Carolina woman is creating an oasis in a food desert

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With the departure of big name grocery stores, the area has been declared a food desert – defined by the USDA as a low-income community of at least 500 people and/or at least 33 percent of the census tract’s population residing more than one mile from a supermarket or large grocery store.

By Susan Ardis
The State
Apr 4, 2017

Excerpt:

On what was once a vacant lot behind Chicora Graded School – on Success Street – Germaine Jenkins is planting the seeds of hope and sustainability with Fresh Future Farm, a 0.81 acre, no-till organic farm growing fresh fruits and vegetables and providing fresh honey and eggs directly to the community.

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April 11, 2017   Comments Off on How one South Carolina woman is creating an oasis in a food desert