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A Brooklyn Rooftop, condo owners will be able to sign up for plots to harvest edible crops

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Under construction.

Rooftop view of 550 Vanderbilt in Brooklyn, where tenants will be able to grow crops. Photo: Peter J. Smith For The Wall Street Journal

Do-it-yourself farmers who can afford condos priced at an average of $1,500 a square foot, with one-bedroom units starting at $890,000 and two-bedrooms at $1.495 million.

By Josh Barbanel
Wall St Journal
April 5, 2017

Excerpts:

On a large south-facing terrace on the eighth floor of 550 Vanderbilt Ave., an 18-story brick and concrete building near the Barclays Center in downtown Brooklyn, crews are erecting three large metal boxes and filling them with soil suitable for high-altitude farming.

Condo owners will be able to sign up for a small plot to grow their own vegetables there, alongside Ian Rothman, a farmer and co-owner of Olmsted, a trendy farm-to-table restaurant a few blocks away.

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April 12, 2017   Comments Off on A Brooklyn Rooftop, condo owners will be able to sign up for plots to harvest edible crops

New York’s New School students research rooftop urban gardens

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Green Roof Ecology is an undergraduate course at The New School that partners with Brooklyn Grange and Vice Media.

New School News
Apr 5, 2017

Excerpt:

In 2014, Vice Media, having just moved into its their new offices in Williamsburg, worked with Brooklyn Grange to turn their expansive rooftop into a vegetable garden for their employees to enjoy.

From the beautiful scenery to the delicious vegetables, the perks of Vice’s rooftop urban farm seem fairly obviously. But what benefits might this green infrastructure have to the broader environment?

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April 12, 2017   Comments Off on New York’s New School students research rooftop urban gardens

$500,000 from the National Science Foundation goes to urban agriculture research

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In addition to his work studying recycled nutrients in the soil of the community garden, professor Chip Small studies the same phenomenon in hydroponics, where the waste from fish is used to feed aquatic plants. (Photo by Mike Ekern ’02)

“The main focal point of the grant is on the use of nutrients and how to recycle them efficiently.

By Jordan Osterman
St. Thomas Newsroom
April 5, 2017

Excerpt:

“I’ve been asking questions about how efficiently we can recycle nutrients from food waste into new food through composting, coupled with urban agriculture,” Small said. “Something like nearly half the food imported into cities ends up as waste, and we compost maybe 5 percent of that waste. Theoretically that could be scaled up and provide lots of nutrients for urban agriculture.”

Of course, scaling anything up means increasing the amount of everything in play and, when it comes to growing food, that means increasing the amount of phosphorus.

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April 12, 2017   Comments Off on $500,000 from the National Science Foundation goes to urban agriculture research