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Erie, Pennsylvania looks as urban farming plan

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Charles Buki, whose firm authored the city’s comprehensive development plan, says urban agriculture could be a good fit for Erie with planning and citizen input.

The Erie Planning Commission’s recommendations regarding zoning changes that would permit or clarify the rules for small crop farming in the city on residential properties and vacant lots, particularly in targeted areas.

By Kevin Flowers
Go Eire
Apr 9, 2017

Excerpt:

The Planning Commission’s recommendations include:

•Defining “urban garden, ” “market garden” and “farm stand” in city zoning ordinances, and making them permitted uses within areas of the city now zoned medium density residential, high density residential and residential/limited business.

•Creating a specific zoning ordinance section that permits urban gardens on vacant lots in medium density residential, high density residential and residential/limited business areas, and making market gardens a “special exception” on vacant lots on those same districts.

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April 14, 2017   Comments Off on Erie, Pennsylvania looks as urban farming plan

An Innovative Micro Farm at Restaurant in Brooklyn

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Olmsted restaurant mini-farm. Click on image for larger file.

A pair of quails, mascots of sorts for Olmsted, watch over the garden and provide eggs.

By Annie Quigley
Gardenista
September 15, 2016
(Must see. Mike)

Excerpt:

A buzzy new restaurant in Brooklyn is condensing today’s biggest food trends (farm-to-table, sustainability, no-waste) into a tiny backyard garden. At Olmsted, named for the famous landscape architect who designed nearby Prospect Park, chef Greg Baxtrom (formerly at Per Se and Blue Hill at Stone Barns) and farmer Ian Rothman (the former horticulturist at New York’s Atera restaurant) have cultivated a self-sustaining micro-farm—complete with an aquaponics system in a clawfoot bathtub. Plus: The space transforms into an oasis in which to sip garden-fresh cocktails, every dish on the menu is under $24, and a donation is made to nonprofit GrowNYC for every meal eaten. Here, a look inside this clever kitchen garden.

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April 14, 2017   Comments Off on An Innovative Micro Farm at Restaurant in Brooklyn