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New York: Urban Farmer Transforms Community Into Thriving Local Food Haven

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Click on image for larger file. Photo by Craig Warga. At the Kelly Street Garden, a 2,500-square-foot space on the grounds of an affordable housing complex, she serves as garden manager.

Last year, the Kelly Street Garden produced 1,200 pounds of food, available to anyone in the community who volunteered at the garden (and even those who didn’t), free of cost.

By Melissa Denchak
Eco Watch
Apr 11, 2017

Excerpt:

Most people don’t move to New York City and become farmers. Sheryll Durrant certainly wasn’t planning to when she left Jamaica for Manhattan in 1989. She got her undergraduate degree in business from the City University of New York’s Baruch College and spent the next 20 years in marketing. Then, when the 2008 financial crisis hit, Durrant decided to leave her job and try something new: volunteering at a community garden in her Brooklyn neighborhood.

It wasn’t exactly uncharted terrain for this farmer’s daughter. Growing up in Kingston, Durrant regularly helped her parents harvest homegrown fruits and vegetables. “But it didn’t dawn on me that that was what I wanted to do,” she said. Volunteering in the Brooklyn garden reminded her of her roots. “I would plant flowers or melons and that sense of putting your hand in the soil and becoming a part of that green space flooded back to me,” she explained.

Read the complete article here.