New Stories From 'Urban Agriculture Notes'
Random header image... Refresh for more!

New York City Rooftop – Hell’s Kitchen Farm

How does their garden grow? Kiddie pools, pots, and hanging planters play host to good green things on the roof of Metro Baptist Church. Photo by Rebecca Fiore.

Hell’s Kitchen Farm Project (HKFP), a 4,000-square-foot volunteer-run rooftop garden containing 52 kiddie pools, 38 pots, and 20 rail hanging planters tasked with growing fresh, organic fruits, and vegetables.

By Scott Stiffler
Chelsea Now
June 14, 2017

Excerpt:

There aren’t a lot of affordable grocery stores in this area and there was a concern that low-income people, especially the food pantry clients who weren’t really able to eat fresh, healthy vegetables,” Debbie Mullens, a third-year volunteer, said.

Lettuce, tomatoes, Swiss chard, kale, collared greens, radishes, scallions, mustard greens, bok choy, apples, blueberries, and raspberries grow in the kiddie pools and pots, while herbs are grown in the rail-hanging planters.

[Read more →]

June 20, 2017   Comments Off on New York City Rooftop – Hell’s Kitchen Farm

Cincinnati City Council hopes to turn vacant, blighted properties into urban farms

Cincinnati City Council is considering a new pilot program that could flip as many as 10 vacant parcels of land into gardens ready for planting anything from herbs to cucumbers.

By Amanda Seitz
WCPO
Jun 15, 2017

Excerpt:

Supporters believe the humble start to this project could ultimately alleviate some of the city’s most stubborn problems: food deserts, unemployment and blight.

“It will assist in taking that blight, that was a negative, and not only improving the look, but providing sustenance to the area as well,” said Cincinnati City Councilman Kevin Flynn, who proposed the program.

[Read more →]

June 20, 2017   Comments Off on Cincinnati City Council hopes to turn vacant, blighted properties into urban farms