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Urban Farming Gets New York City Council Attention

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Rob Laing, right, CEO and founder of Farm.One, and farmhand Caleb Raff at the Farm.One hydroponic farm at the Institute of Culinary Education in lower Manhattan on Wednesday. Photo: Claudio Papapietro For The Wall Street Journal

Rooftop gardens, greenhouses and ‘vertical farms’ may benefit from more clarity on zoning and insurance

By Thomas MacMillan
Wall Street Journal
July 20, 2017

When Robert Laing was setting up his indoor herb-growing business in Manhattan last year, it took months to find someone willing to insure his tiny hydroponic operation.

“You say, ‘I’m a farm,’ and they put you over to their farming division and they say, ‘How many acres do you have?’ and you say, ‘300 square feet,’” Mr. Laing said.

New York City has the largest urban agriculture system in the country, including community and rooftop gardens and greenhouses, as well as “vertical farms” like Mr. Laing’s company, Farm.One, which cultivates microgreens in windowless rooms aglow with LED lights. But a recent report by the Brooklyn Law School finds new growers are sometimes stymied by confusion and lack of regulations.

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July 20, 2017   Comments Off on Urban Farming Gets New York City Council Attention

Washington’s Navy Yard apartment gives residents free rooftop produce garden

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The 470-square-foot garden will yield roughly 500 pounds of produce each year

By Jeff Clabaugh
Stop
July 13, 2017

Excerpt:

F1RST Residences just upped the game for luxury apartment amenities in Washington, giving residents access to fresh, rooftop-grown produce.

The new 325-unit Navy Yard apartment building’s first tenants began moving in this spring.

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Botanical conservatory showcases five aspects of German culture including the allotment or ‘kleingarten’

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Foellinger-Freimann Botanical Conservatory is honoring Fort Wayne’s German sister city, Gera, with “Blumengarten: A German Story” through Nov. 12.

By Corey McMaken
Journal Gazette
July 14, 2017

Excerpt:

A small shack and planting of vegetables represents a German allotment garden, or “kleingarten.” In the 1800s, land was set aside near German towns for the urban poor to raise fruits and vegetables.

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July 20, 2017   Comments Off on Botanical conservatory showcases five aspects of German culture including the allotment or ‘kleingarten’