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Flock of sheep move through streets of Montreal to carry on lawnmowing duties

Volunteer shepherds guide a flock of sheep to their new park Wednesday, July 26, 2017 in Montreal. The sheep are part of a pilot project where they act as eco-friendly lawn mowers, chewing on the long grass, but also help by eating vegetation that poses a threat to public green spaces.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

She says the animals have become stars in the neighbourhood, drawing people together and letting them experience a taste of farm life in the city.

Morgan Lowrie
The Canadian Press
July 27, 2017

Excerpt:

With only a few bleats of protest, a flock of woolly, four-legged lawnmowers took a rare stroll through the streets of Montreal on Wednesday to take up their duties in a new city park.

The six ewes and four lambs were carefully herded along the sidewalk from one park to another with the help of shepherds and volunteers holding up orange barricades.

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L.A.’s New Urban Farm Initiative Struggles to Sow its Seeds

A parcel listed as a potential location for an urban garden sits on a residential street in Manhattan Beach. By Marie Targonski-O’Brien

Los Angeles is offering landowners financial incentives to turn their urban property into green spaces. Unfortunately, nobody has applied yet.

By Marie Targonski-O’Brien
KCET
July 18, 2017

Excerpt:

“We haven’t had a single contract come through,” says Bruce Durbin, Supervising Planner at Los Angeles County Department of Regional Planning.

Durbin says finding landowners and farmers who are interested in participating is a big part of the battle.

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The Vancouver Resident’s Guide to Alternative Gardening

City Beet Urban Farm in Mount Pleasant by Ruth Hartnup.

According to City Hall, there are over 110 community gardens within the City of Vancouver which can be found on city-owned land, at churches, at schools, and on private property.

By Jay Banks
Vancouver Homes
July 25, 2017

Excerpt:

Another option the City has been actively promoting for gardeners is the option to plant on City land in places like boulevards and traffic circles. As O’Neill explains, any resident who has a boulevard in front of their property is encouraged to use that space for growing both edible and ornamental plants.

The boulevard is defined as the place between the curb and the sidewalk. For those who don’t have access to a boulevard, another option could be to become a volunteer with the Green Streets program, which allows volunteers to plant gardens in traffic calming areas such as traffic circles and bulges.

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