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Urban Agriculture in the Neoliberal City: Critical European Perspectives

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In the Garden. by James Charles 1904.

Themed Section (5 papers): Food planning – Special section on urban agriculture now published in ACME

ACME: An International Journal for Critical Geographies
Vol 16, No 2 (2017)
Guest Eds.McClintock & Darly

Introduction to Urban Agriculture in the Neoliberal City: Critical European Perspectives
Ségolène Darly, Nathan McClintock

Between Green Image Production, Participatory Politics and Growth: Urban Agriculture and Gardens in the Context of Neoliberal Urban Development in Vienna
Sarah Kumnig

Abstract

Vienna is a green city. Around 50% of the urban area is green space, there are 630 farms and the number of community gardens is constantly growing. Not only do activists try to reclaim the city by cultivating vegetables on fallow land, but even the new urban development plan presents urban gardening as an innovative impulse for the city. At the same time agricultural spaces are increasingly under pressure because of population growth and a construction boom. This paper offers a thorough analysis of the implications that neoliberal urban development has for agricultural spaces and practices in Vienna.

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August 1, 2017   Comments Off on Urban Agriculture in the Neoliberal City: Critical European Perspectives

Hawaii: Rat Lungworm, the Tropical Parasite That Took Hawaii by Surprise

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The most likely transmission route for the rat lungworm is the semislug P. martensi. Immature semislugs can be smaller than an uncooked grain of rice—easy to miss on a leaf of lettuce or kale. Illustration By Jee-Ook Choi.

Joint stiffness, fatigue, and nausea after eating kale from his garden—the earliest signs, it would turn out, of a mysterious parasitic infection.

By Alissa Greenberg
The New Yorker
June 12, 2017

Excerpt:

Rat lungworm has likely been present in Hawaii for hundreds of years, perhaps brought by rodents that stowed away aboard Polynesian ships. What, then, accounts for the apparent uptick in infections? All signs point to a newcomer to the archipelago—Parmarion martensi, a Southeast Asian semi-slug, so called because it sports a tiny shell too small to actually live inside. The animal can carry at least twice as many nematode larvae per milligram as other mollusk species; some researchers theorize that its spongy muscle tissue is especially easy for rat lungworm to penetrate.

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August 1, 2017   Comments Off on Hawaii: Rat Lungworm, the Tropical Parasite That Took Hawaii by Surprise

How do you create a community garden in Austin, Texas? One neighborhood shows us

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Jennifer Noinaj and Amelia Cobb, president of North Shoal Creek Neighborhood Association, build raised beds. Carolyn Lindell/For American-Statesmanv.

The group plans for the garden to have 22 raised beds, each 4-foot-by-8-foot. Nineteen of the beds will be leased for $25 per year. The fenced-in garden will be about 60-foot-by-40-foot.

By Carolyn Lindell
American-Statesman
July 25, 2017

Excerpt:

A lot of time has been spent ironing out details with various entities, such the City of Austin Parks and Recreation Department and the Austin school district.

The project has received help in the form of a $10,000 community grant from the Austin Parks Foundation, as well as sponsorship from the Sustainable Food Center of Austin.

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August 1, 2017   Comments Off on How do you create a community garden in Austin, Texas? One neighborhood shows us