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Switzerland: Allotments. My Plot Of Land

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Murat and Birsen Lavanur, from Turkey. “We have had the allotment for two years and we still have to learn a lot. Our kids can spend some time in nature and can run around freely.”

In Switzerland, amateur gardeners joined up to form associations, which led to the creation of a Swiss umbrella association in 1925. Now, 24,500 members and the equivalent of around 900 football fields belong to the Swiss Association of Allotment Gardeners.

Photographs and text, Ester Unterfinger, swissinfo.ch
Production, Felipe Schärer Diem, Sylvie Stark
Swiss Broadcasting Organization
Aug 8, 2017
(Must see. Mike)

Excerpt:

For years, allotment gardens were considered a symbol of the Swiss bourgeoisie, but times have changed. Now, people of all nations appreciate them as place to withdraw and relax. Vito from Italy, Birsen from Turkey, Vaz from Portugal and other allotment enthusiasts talk about their individual plots of land.

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August 11, 2017   No Comments

Anchorage, Alaska urban farm teaches young employees life skill

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Within a 10,000 square foot warehouse in Spenard, rows of vertical hydroponic towers are tended to by a handful of young adult employees.

By Travis Khachatoorian
KYUU
Aug 4, 2017

Excerpt:

Johndro said she hires youth between the ages of 16 and 24 in needs of life skills.

“This is not a forever job,” said Johndro. “This is part-time, short-term, like six-months to a year, with a goal of moving on to a better more permanent job within the community.”

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August 11, 2017   No Comments

Edinburgh and Glasgow plan a community food growing revolution

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A team from Possil health centre in Glasgow tend to their allotment box. Picture: John Devlin/TSPL

Scotland’s largest local authority is already planning ahead by speaking with residents on how they can grow food in their own neighbourhoods.

By Chris Mccall
Scotsman
Aug 3, 2017

Excerpt:

The consultation by Glasgow City Council attracted hundreds of responses from individuals and community groups, the results of which will now be analysed before being presented to councillors.

“We are delighted with the level of response,” a council spokeswoman told The Scotsman. “This shows how excited Glaswegians are about all sorts of food growing opportunities.”

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August 11, 2017   No Comments