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A new rooftop garden will provide fresh food for New Orleans conventioneers

Building maintenance workers at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center place soil in a new 225-feet long and 3-feet high cedar planting bed for a rooftop vegetable garden. Photo by Frankie Prijatel

The garden will provide freshly picked vegetables and herbs to Centerplate, the convention center’s food and beverage provider.

By Kendra Parks
NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune
Aug 21, 2017

Excerpt:

Team members assembled multiple 3-foot-by-225-foot garden beds growing different types of tomatoes, cauliflower, herbs, root and leafy vegetables. The beds are filled with a sphagnum moss base and 49 cubic yards of Laughing Buddha soil mix incorporating worm castings and peat moss.

Borage, marigold, nasturtium and chamomile will be some of the edible flowers planted with the vegetables. Basil, dill, oregano and parsley also will be interspersed in the plantings.

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August 28, 2017   Comments Off on A new rooftop garden will provide fresh food for New Orleans conventioneers

Glasgow’s Community Gardens: Sustainable Communities of Care

Community gardens are not yet embedded in place or institutions – their immediate future is precarious in many cases.

Dr John Crossan
Professor Deirdre Shaw
Professor Andrew Cumbers
Professor Robert McMaste
University of Glasgow 2015

Excerpt:

The potential for community gardening is high in old industrial cities where the loss of manufacturing industry has resulted in vast areas of unused spaces. Glasgow is a particularly pertinent case with 1300 hectares of vacant and derelict land, representing 4% of its total land area and comprising 925 individual sites. As a result over 60% of Glasgow City’s population lives within 500 metres, and over 90% within 1000 metres, of a derelict site. This is important when considering issues of social and environmental justice, as most of the vacant and derelict land can be found in the most deprived areas of the city, thus, disproportionately affecting the poorest citizens (see Map 1).

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August 28, 2017   Comments Off on Glasgow’s Community Gardens: Sustainable Communities of Care