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Canada: Whitehorse man’s homemade ‘root heater’ is growing veggies faster, longer

The back of Bartsch’s root heater which acts like a solar panel. It soaks in the sunlight and heats the water that pumps into the ground. (Submitted by Chris Bartsch)

“The mayor told me later, ‘That was the best tomato we had ever tasted and it was the biggest tomato we had ever seen,'” said Bartsch, chuckling.

By Priscilla Hwang
CBC News
Sep 24, 2017

Excerpt:

Previously a radial floor heating system installer, Bartsch was inspired to find material available locally to build his root heater — or solar collector, as he calls it.

It looks like an unassuming framed, silver and black rectangle, and is made of scraps of roofing metal, black tubing (to absorb sunlight), a refurbished circulator pump, hoses, and some electricity.

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October 2, 2017   Comments Off on Canada: Whitehorse man’s homemade ‘root heater’ is growing veggies faster, longer

Canada: Windsor couple transform tornado-ravaged backyard into urban farm

“It took out everything. Fence, shed, everything,” said Whitford, who works as a pharmacy technician in Harrow. “The only thing that was left was the vegetable garden.”

By Jonathan Pinto
CBC News
Sep 25, 2017

Excerpt:

A chef at Windsor Club saw the pictures and approached Kavanaugh and Whitford about supplying the private club with microgreens, mini-versions of vegetables popular in the food world.

“They loved the stuff that we were growing,” Whitford said. “So then we decided that when we were rebuilding [our backyard], we were going to rebuild it to strictly just grow produce.”

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October 2, 2017   Comments Off on Canada: Windsor couple transform tornado-ravaged backyard into urban farm

Council vote opens door for urban farming in Chattanooga

Former Judge Walter Williams speaks to the Chattanooga City Council.
Photo by Contributed Photo /Times Free Press.

Chattanoogans can now raise cows, horses, goats or even chickens if they have at least 5 acres of land.

By Paul Leach
Times Free Press
Sept 27, 2017

Excerpt:

“I have been contacted by several in my district that have situations where they would like to have agricultural farm animals,” said Councilman Chip Henderson, who represents Lookout Valley.

Henderson, who championed the inclusion of the special permitting, has previously said “certain locations, certain properties” would be appropriate for urban agricultural zoning.

Berz, who supported the 5-acre threshold, has worried special permitting would make a law for exceptions.

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October 2, 2017   Comments Off on Council vote opens door for urban farming in Chattanooga