New Stories From 'Urban Agriculture Notes'
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Australia’s first community garden celebrates 40 years

Margaret Rackham, centre, with fellow gardeners at Nunawading Community Gardens. Photo: Justin McManus

With 127 plots and a current waiting list of 12 years, the Nunawading Community Gardens is a vibrant, verdant hive of activity.

By Megan Backhouse
Sydney Morning Herald
Oct 20, 2017

Excerpt:

In the mid-1970s a Nunawading dentist named Gaven Oakley took a holiday in England and found himself captivated by the country’s community gardens. This was the era of Tom and Barbara pursuing self-sufficiency in downtown London in the TV series The Good Life. Growing your own food was in the air.

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October 25, 2017   Comments Off on Australia’s first community garden celebrates 40 years

Canada: Urban Farming Works In Windsor

Bishop’s Urban Farm.

These are not large acreages, or acreages at all, for that matter. One of the plots is actually in their backyard.

By Ian Shalapata
The Square
17 October 2017

Excerpt:

The enterprising couple are simply returning city land to vegetable production sites. Instead of cutting their lawn in the summer, they go through a number planting, harvesting, and replanting cycles using the same soil beds with a goal of producing as many crops as is possible to meet the demand they are creating.

These are not large acreages, or acreages at all, for that matter. One of the plots is actually in their backyard. The secret, Kavanaugh told The Square, rests squarely in the types of crops that are grown along with systems to increase effectiveness and efficiency.

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October 25, 2017   Comments Off on Canada: Urban Farming Works In Windsor

Cleveland residents plant the seeds for reinvention

Rid-All Green Partnership took over 1.5 acres of the property (and is set to assume another 1.5 acres soon). To date, they have harvested 14,000 pounds of produce; raised 350 pounds of tilapia; and cultivated 1,200 cubic yards of compost.

By Karin Connelly Rice
Freshwater
October 19, 2017

Excerpt:

CornUcopia Place is just one way BBC has taken steps to eliminate Kinsman’s ranking as a food desert by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Today, the neighborhood is rich with healthy eating options, as well as an unusual amount of gardens and fruit trees.

A 28-acre stretch of land on E. 81st Street and Otter Avenue is now deemed the Urban Agriculture Innovation Zone—one of the more ambitious projects taken on by BBC. This tract of land is in what is known as “the forgotten triangle,” running from Woodland Road to the north, Kinsman Road from the south and west, and the railroad tracks off of E. 84th Street.

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October 25, 2017   Comments Off on Cleveland residents plant the seeds for reinvention