New Stories From 'Urban Agriculture Notes'
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1974, San Francisco’s ‘The Farm’ – Part of The History of Urban Agriculture

Work party at The Farm, c. 1975. Also must see: The Farm (documentary) 47 minutes
by Mike Kavanaugh, MaryEllen Churchill, and Kathy Katz

In SF, art still thrives and celebrates its history at The Farm

By Laura Wenus
Mission Local
November 9, 2017
(Must see. Mike)

Excerpt:

Joan Holden, director of the San Francisco Mime Troupe at the time, remembered The Farm in its early days in a documentary collecting memories of The Farm.

“It was this little spot of nature, this little eruption of nature in the middle of the concrete jungle, proving that life could still exist there,” she said at the time.

It drew the attention of some of the Mission’s now best-known artists, including René Yañez, and Dogpaw Carrillo among others.

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November 15, 2017   Comments Off on 1974, San Francisco’s ‘The Farm’ – Part of The History of Urban Agriculture

Urban Refuge: How Cities Can Help Rebuild Declining Bee Populations

If everyone in a city of a million people planted even one pollinator-friendly plant,” she says, “there would be a million more foraging opportunities for bees.”

By Janet Marinelli
Yale Environment 360
November 9, 2017

Excerpt:

Few scientists believe that urban habitats are a panacea for bee conservation, although they do support some important populations. In the words of Tina Harrison of Rutgers University, who studies the homogenization of bee communities in disturbed landscapes, “Pollinators that are successful in cities are often very common in other habitats in the surrounding region,” and a focus on conserving them could divert much-needed funds from efforts to protect vulnerable bees. Conserving regionally rare or specialist bees that have found a refuge in cities, though, is probably a good idea, she says.

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November 15, 2017   Comments Off on Urban Refuge: How Cities Can Help Rebuild Declining Bee Populations

Innovations from Cleveland’s urban farms are taking root around the world

Rid-All Green Partnership, a thriving, three-acre green space.

Four of Cleveland’s thriving urban farms that exemplify the movement’s roots in building communities and creating opportunities: Chateau Hough, Green City Growers, Rid-All-Green Partnership, and Ohio City Farm

By Billy Hallal
Freshwater
November 09, 2017

Excerpt:

Randy McShepard is well aware of the common misconceptions about urban farming in Cleveland. “People say, ‘The soil’s contaminated! You can’t do it!’ or ‘There are just three months of good weather in Cleveland!’”

But McShepard is proving them wrong. He’s a co-founder of the Rid-All Green Partnership, a thriving, three-acre green space in the struggling but strengthening Kinsman neighborhood.

Rid-All has found creative ways around typical urban agriculture obstacles. They grow cold-weather crops like collard greens and kale, harvesting 11 months out of the year. As for the soil, they make their own. Wood chips and food waste (of which they use up to 50,000 pounds a week during peak season) decompose for months to form Rid-All’s “Black Gold,” a profitable compost soil that ships all across the state.

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November 15, 2017   Comments Off on Innovations from Cleveland’s urban farms are taking root around the world