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Milwaukee: Growing Power’s loss saddens community leaders

The Growing Power cafe and market, at 2719 N. Dr. Martin Luther King Drive, is permanently closed after the nonprofit ran into financial difficulties. (Photo by Elliot Hughes)

Growing Power’s website has been stripped of all content and workers could be seen emptying the cafe-market at 2719 N King Drive on Wednesday. The institution has dissolved.

By Elliot Hughes
Milwaukeens
December 1/ update Dec 10, 2017

Excerpt:

That news hits hard for some community leaders, who appreciated Growing Power for its green, sustainable food practices, its influence on urban farming and the healthy food it spread throughout the city. But those interviewed feel good about the future of urban farming and that of Dr. Martin Luther King Drive, where the nonprofit had a cafe-market.

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December 11, 2017   Comments Off on Milwaukee: Growing Power’s loss saddens community leaders

New Zealand: 2017 Gardena Gardener of the Year winners are Thames Bright Smile Community Gardens

Rebekah Manley-Campbell (left) and Samantha Claire have worked to create the most inclusive community garden in New Zealand. Photo Christel Yardley/Stuff.

The garden is named for the original Bright Smile mine which had been located there in the late 1800s.

By Mei Leng Wong
Nz Gardener
December 4 2017

Excerpt:

Rebekah Manley-Campbell and Samantha Claire work at the Bright Smile Community Garden in the Coromandel town, which is managed and run by the Supported Lifestyle Hauraki Trust, an organisation set up to care for people with a wide range of physical and mental challenges.

As the duo are keen to ensure the garden is a welcoming place for everyone, they make sure that there is something here for everyone – whatever their interest or ability, young or old.

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December 11, 2017   Comments Off on New Zealand: 2017 Gardena Gardener of the Year winners are Thames Bright Smile Community Gardens

Urban Farmers pick up excess fruits in yards in Contra Costa County

Tangerines are picked by Pat Alger, of Brentwood, left, Vicki Grant, of Pleasanton, center, and Anirban Chowdhury, of Antioch, at a tree where the owner donated all the fruit in in Oakley, Calif. Fruit is picked up by White Pony Express and distributed to food banks. (Susan Tripp Pollard/Bay Area News Group)

The program divides the various Contra Costa County communities in sections with a group volunteer harvest leader that takes care of each section.

By Roni Gehlke
East Bay Times
December 3, 2017

Excerpt:

While we usually think of helping feed those in need during this time of year, The Urban Farmers harvest fruit from trees all year-long and requires a lot of volunteer help to keep the program going. Not only are they always looking for those who are interested in donating their harvest, but they are always in need of volunteers to harvest the fruit.

The program divides the various Contra Costa County communities in sections with a group volunteer harvest leader that takes care of each section. When a call comes in that trees are ready to harvest a section, the harvest leaders organizes volunteers to help harvest. Harvest leaders are also on the list of volunteers needed. This program only takes a few hours a month for harvest leaders and volunteer harvesters.

A few students from local high schools looking to fulfill their community service hours even have gotten in on the fun of volunteering for this group.

“While our (high school) seniors are required to earn community service hours, this is one activity they love to do and look forward to,” said Brentwood resident and Oakley’s Freedom High School science teacher, John Sierra. “Many of them have never picked their own food, and they’re tasting things like persimmons and pomegranates that many have never had before.”

Read the complete article here.

December 11, 2017   Comments Off on Urban Farmers pick up excess fruits in yards in Contra Costa County