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Vancouver BC: What’s Growing in City Farmer’s Garden on January 4, 2018

Mixed winter salad greens.

Ten things we can eat today from our West Coast garden

By Michael Levenston
City Farmer
Jan 4, 2018

We raked our paths and trimmed our plants today as temperatures reached 5 degrees celsius, a mild day this winter. We have had frost and snow recently, but our winter is tropical compared to the “bomb cyclone” hitting the East Coast.

Here are some of the winter crops we can pick and eat today at Vancouver’s Compost Education Garden.

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January 4, 2018   Comments Off on Vancouver BC: What’s Growing in City Farmer’s Garden on January 4, 2018

A garden and a ‘Share Shed’ are helping this couple build a more inclusive neighborhood

Garden grown tomatoes ready for sharing, courtesy of the “Share Shed.” Courtesy of Wen Lee.

Looking to connect with their neighbors, the pair put their bounty of zucchinis, tomatoes, peppers, and other vegetables on their front porch in a cul-de-sac in Temple City, California.

By Monica Luhar
NBC News
Dec.28.2017

Excerpt:

Projects such as the Share Shed can serve as a vital social bonding experiment, according to Dr. Long Wang, an assistant professor of nutrition and dietetics at California State University, Long Beach.

Exposing young children to community gardens and fresh produce makes them more likely to incorporate these foods into their diets as they get older, he noted.

“If kids have early exposure to growing produce, they are more likely to have a healthier relationship with the produce,” Wang said.

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January 4, 2018   Comments Off on A garden and a ‘Share Shed’ are helping this couple build a more inclusive neighborhood

UK: Let there be light to help centre’s tomatoes grow

Tomatoes are grown under LED lights at Stockbridge Technology Centre at Cawood.

Our tomato crops here at Stockbridge Technology Centre will be going strong all winter, thanks to the extra light provided by LED (light emitting diode) technology, which illuminates the crop at very low cost.

By Dr David George
Yorkshire Post
27 December 2017

Excerpt:

We use mainly red and blue LED lighting to grow our tomatoes because they are the two colours of light that plants respond to best. This gives our glasshouses a very festive feel at this time of year – they certainly outshine the single string of Christmas lights in my window at home!

Our work with lighting and crops is led by head of photobiology Dr Phillip Davis, and also extends to other areas. By tweaking the combination of colours and the intensity, duration and pattern of light that our crops receive, we can deliver exciting results, particularly in our urban farm facility, where we have complete control over the levels of light that crops receive.

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January 4, 2018   Comments Off on UK: Let there be light to help centre’s tomatoes grow