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Lessons from Will Allen’s Growing Power

After years of running deficits and with more than half a million dollars in legal judgments against the organization, Allen resigned and the organization closed its doors.

By Mary Turck
The Uptake
December 30, 2017

Excerpt:

The end of Growing Power does not mean the end of urban farming, not any more than a hard frost means the end of a garden. Instead, new plants have already begun to sprout.

In Milwaukee, Green Veterans Wisconsin plans to buy Growing Power’s shuttered headquarters, reclaiming it as “an urban farm school, co-op for small farmers and trauma resolution center.” Its mission: “to regenerate men and women who have served in the military for green jobs and green living.”

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January 5, 2018   Comments Off on Lessons from Will Allen’s Growing Power

This Stylish Table Is the “Next Generation” of Automated Urban Farming

Photo credit: Dan Addison, University Communications, UVA

Babylon is now focused on bringing the farms to consumers outside of universities. Currently, a the micro-farm farm goes for $1,799.

By Jennifer Marston
The Spoon
December 29, 2017

Excerpt:

Recent grad Alexander Olsen started Babylon Micro-Farms in 2016, as part of the University of Virginia student entrepreneurial clubhouse, HackCville. An early prototype won $6,500 from Green Initiatives Funding Tomorrow, part of the UVA student council.

Now, Olsen and six other employees are working to get the hydroponic farms inside the homes of consumers, billing them as “the next generation home appliance.”

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January 5, 2018   Comments Off on This Stylish Table Is the “Next Generation” of Automated Urban Farming

Urban Seas Aquaculture successfully grows shrimp in the heart of a landlocked city – Greenville, South Carolina

Valeska Minkowski holds a shrimp from one of her tanks at Urban Seas Aquaculture on Monday, December 4, 2017. (Photo: Lauren Petracca, LAUREN PETRACCA\STAFF)

While the November harvest yielded about 60-70 pounds of shrimp per tank, Minkowski anticipates a year from now those numbers could be more like 120 to 150 pounds per tank.

By Lillia Callum-Penso
Greenville News
Dec. 29, 2017

Excerpt:

The past year has brought a number of lessons and realizations. Namely, while Minkowski originally thought she would sell to local restaurants, that plan has moved to a fourth-year goal, she says. While there is a lot of interest, she has realized that she just can’t provide the quantity needed.

Instead, she plans to provide shrimp to restaurants and local caterers for special events, which will allow her to plan and harvest ahead. And she plans to step up her sales to the public, though she’s not yet sure what form those will take.

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January 5, 2018   Comments Off on Urban Seas Aquaculture successfully grows shrimp in the heart of a landlocked city – Greenville, South Carolina