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India: Startups reaping dividends in urban farms

The urban farming startup ecosystem could be worth $1billion in India in the next two to four years and will become essential due to environmental concerns

By Shashwati Shankar
Economic Times India
Jan 5, 2018

Excerpt:

In the past three to four years, more than a dozen urban farming startups have been launched in Mumbai, Delhi, Bengaluru, Jaipur and elsewhere. They provide services such as setting up rooftop and balcony farms for independent homes and companies to vertical farming options for those with more wall space than floor area.

“I began with conducting farming and gardening workshops but in the last one or two years we have seen interest significantly increase,” said Kapil Mandawewala, founder of Edible Routes. “I get about 30 orders a month, with a majority coming from independent homes and the rest from community centres, educational institutions or corporates.” Edible Routes was registered in 2016 but was operational in the urban farming space for three years prior to that. Mandawewala began experimenting with farming on family owned land in Gujarat in 2008.

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January 10, 2018   Comments Off on India: Startups reaping dividends in urban farms

Nepal: Urban rooftop farms as new city culture

According to the data of economic activities at Nepal Rastra bank, cultivable land in Nepal has decreased by 30,334 hectares in the fiscal year 2016/17. Hence, rooftop farming can significantly contribute to decrease the import of agricultural products from other countries.

By Aditya Neupane
My Republica
Jan 3, 2018

Excerpt:

One of the main specialties about rooftop farming is that you can also grow unseasonal vegetables and fruits through the green house effect. Rosy Maharjan, trainer of a project named ‘Phohor Maila Bewasthapan Ko Lagi Pratifal Ma Aadharit’, said, “Small families can easily produce enough vegetables for themselves through rooftop farming if it is done in a scientific way.” The project has been providing training on rooftop farming, waste segregation and composting to the residents of Lalitpur Metropolitan City.

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January 10, 2018   Comments Off on Nepal: Urban rooftop farms as new city culture

FarmBot Wants to Cultivate an Open-Source Future for Remote Farming – Can work on rooftops, in backyards

Right now, the FarmBot Genesis goes for $2,595 via the company’s website. The FarmBot Genesis XL, which is available for preorder, costs $3,295 and covers “421 percent the area of for just 38% more cost.”

By Jennifer Marston
The Spoon
January 3, 2018

Excerpt:

Both FarmBot products, made up of cartesean coordinate robots along with software and documentation, can work on rooftops, in backyards, and can accommodate both small- and large-scale farming operations. It’s unclear whether the company means “farm from anywhere” literally, as it says on its website. But considering the highly customizable nature of the product, anyone with some tech know-how could theoretically hack the bot and make it work in any given climate.

A visual interface lets you “plan your garden like a videogame,” according to the company’s website.

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January 10, 2018   Comments Off on FarmBot Wants to Cultivate an Open-Source Future for Remote Farming – Can work on rooftops, in backyards