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How a Mushroom Farm Grows in a Manhattan Restaurant

Though intentionally futuristic in design, the installation is more than aesthetic—it’s a miniature mushroom farm.

By Nina Sparling
Vogue
Jan. 24, 2018

Excerpt:

The mini-farms, also called “fruiting chambers” are largely automated. Sensors and cameras monitor temperature, humidity, carbon dioxide levels, airflow, and light exposure. Carter and DeMartino can keep an eye on any unit from a laptop anywhere. Before the mushrooms are ready for restaurants, they spend between four and six weeks maturing in a warehouse. The mushrooms grow in a substrate made of recycled materials—mostly sawdust mixed with organic matter like wheat berries and coffee grounds.

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January 31, 2018   Comments Off on How a Mushroom Farm Grows in a Manhattan Restaurant

Land on Vancouver church’s lot becomes garden for many to use

Wanda Wilson of Vancouver sits on a raised, wheelchair-accessible garden bed at the Minnie Stromgren Memorial Garden at Vancouver Heights United Methodist Church.

The garden features 34 beds varying in size from 4 by 8 feet to 10 by 20. The smaller beds are available at no cost, but the larger plots are $20.

By Katy Sword
Columbian
January 24, 2018

Excerpt:

At the Vancouver Heights United Methodist Church’s block-wide space, a large parcel of valuable land was vacant. It was previously used to grow corn for a corn feed event, but the ground was now bare. Wanda Wilson wondered whether it could be a community garden. The answer was yes.

“I had to make sure that the zoning and everything was all right with the city,” Wilson said. “As it turns out, there are no regulations for that.”

With the volunteer labor of a church member, an irrigation system was installed and the garden opened for use in 2009.

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January 31, 2018   Comments Off on Land on Vancouver church’s lot becomes garden for many to use