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Canada: A Growing Concern – How to Keep Farmland in the Hands of Canadian Farmers

Some witnesses said there is still a risk that farmland owned by non-agricultural investors will not be used for agriculture and will eventually be sold for other purposes. To this end, strengthening the legislative framework for farmland protection would make a major difference.

Report of the Standing Senate Committee on Agriculture and Forestry
The Honourable Diane F. Grifin, Chair
The Honourable Ghislain Maltais, Deputy Chair
March 2018
(Must see. Mike)

FOREWORD

In the course of other work, the Committee heard concerns regarding the rising costs of farmland in Canada, including how families could pass their farms from generation to generation and the ability of new entrants to afford to buy land.

The family farm has been the backbone of rural Canada for generations. The Committee felt it would be remiss if it did not undertake a study on the acquisition of farmland in Canada and its potential impact on the farming sector to address these concerns.

The first part of the report focuses on the use of farmland and changes in farmland values. The second part of the report explains changes in farmland values and their impact on farmland availability. The final part of the report outlines ways to ensure access to farmland for future generations of Canadians.

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March 19, 2018   Comments Off on Canada: A Growing Concern – How to Keep Farmland in the Hands of Canadian Farmers

One hive at a time, backyard beekeepers try saving Detroit, the world

Keith Crispen, 32, of Detroit, left, and Timothy Paule, 34, of Detroit started a nonprofit called Detroit Hives that transformed a vacant lot on the east side of Detroit to a bee hive and future farm. (Photo: Kimberly P. Mitchell, Detroit Free Press)

Mike Hansen, the state apiarist who oversees commercial bee inspections, said unofficial estimates of the number of people in Michigan with beehives on rooftops and in backyards range from about 3,000 to 10,000.

By Frank Witsil
Detroit Free Press
March 14, 2018

Excerpt:

The Detroiter hopes to add as many as 200 hives in the city in the next decade through his nonprofit, Detroit Hives, by buying vacant Detroit lots, making deals with socially conscious companies to sponsor hives and teaching other people, including schoolchildren, about bees.

“If all bees were to die, we’d all die in four to five years,” Paule, 34, said. “It’s a very serious issue.”

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March 19, 2018   Comments Off on One hive at a time, backyard beekeepers try saving Detroit, the world

American Veterinarian: Unregulated Backyard Chickens Pose Health Risk, Study Says

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A UC Davis study is calling for more regulations regarding chickens being raised in urban and suburban settings.

By Amanda Carrozza
American Veterinarian
March 12, 2018

Excerpt:

While it is difficult to pinpoint the exact number of Americans who currently raise chickens in urban and suburban environments, a US Department of Agriculture (USDA) survey of homeowners in 4 major US cities (Denver, Los Angeles Miami, New York City) found that 0.8% owned chickens in 2013. An additional 4% said they planned to own chickens in the next 5 years, and nearly 40% were in favor of allowing chickens in their communities and would not mind if their neighbors owned chickens.

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March 19, 2018   Comments Off on American Veterinarian: Unregulated Backyard Chickens Pose Health Risk, Study Says