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Canada: A Garden On Every Corner

Broadway and MacDonald.

In Vancouver, British Columbia, one social enterprise looks to make the most of unused urban space by converting empty lots into temporary community gardens.

By Chris Reid
Vancouver Community Garden Builders
Mar 27, 2018

There used to be a gas station at the corner of Cambie and 16th Avenue in Vancouver’s Mount Pleasant neighbourhood. Today the site hosts 100 raised garden beds and provides growing space for roughly the same number of gardeners, many of whom are families living in nearby apartments and condominiums.

The project is the result of a partnership between Wesgroup, a local developer, and Vancouver Community Garden Builders, a local social enterprise. Together the pair opened six new gardens in 2017, which equals 600 new garden beds. In total, VCGB manages eight projects with close to 800 beds, or 16,000 square feet of urban growing space.

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March 28, 2018   Comments Off on Canada: A Garden On Every Corner

Turning cities into sponges: how Chinese ancient wisdom is taking on climate change

The first strategy – “based on thousands of years of Chinese wisdom” – is to “contain water at the origin, when the rain falls from the sky on the ground. We have to keep the water”.

Landscape architect Kongjian Yu is making ‘friends with water’ to mitigate extreme weather events in modern metropolises

By Brigid Delaney
The Guardian
21 Mar 2018

Excerpt:

How does a city cope with extreme weather? These days, urban planning that doesn’t factor in some sort of catastrophic weather event is like trying to build something in a fictional utopia. For Kongjian Yu, one of the world’s leading landscape architects, the answer to coping with extreme weather events actually lies in the past.

Yu is the founder and dean of the school of landscape architecture at Peking University, founding director of architectural firm Turenscape, and famous for being the man who reintroduced ancient Chinese water systems to modern design. In the process he has transformed some of China’s most industrialised cities into standard bearers of green architecture.

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March 28, 2018   Comments Off on Turning cities into sponges: how Chinese ancient wisdom is taking on climate change

Canada: New docu-series focuses on therapeutic horticulture for the visually impaired

The Growing Sense documentary series follows new friends Milena Khazanavicius (right), a visually impaired gardening enthusiast, and Rosmarie Lohnes from the Helping Nature Heal company on a season’s worth of planting, harvesting and healing. (MARK PIKE)

“I became a therapeutic horticulturalist instead of a horticultural therapist, and now I mentor and assist people who may or may not have a strict medical diagnosis but who believe that nature can heal them,” she says.

By Lisa Cochrane
Chronicle Herald
Mar 19, 2018

Excerpt:

“They focus on scent and textures, the sound of the wind. All the senses, not just the visual,” Oakes said.

They also tackle some of Lohnes’ more challenging landscaping projects, all with an eco-friendly twist.

Along the way, according to a Tell Tale release, the characters explore the many benefits of community gardening, the healing powers of connecting with nature and the satisfaction of growing one’s own food. And keeping AMI-tv’s mandate in mind, they share helpful tips for gardeners of all abilities, including those living with sight loss.

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March 28, 2018   Comments Off on Canada: New docu-series focuses on therapeutic horticulture for the visually impaired