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How the White House garden became a political football

First lady Melania Trump plants and harvests vegetables in the White House kitchen garden with children from the Boys & Girls Club of Greater Washington on Sept. 22. 2017 (Melina Mara/The Washington Post)

Melania Trump finally made her first appearance in the garden on Sept. 22, 2017 (The Internet was quick to note that her ostensibly modest flannel shirt cost $1,380.)

By Anastasia Day
Washington Post
April 3, 2018
Anastasia Day is a Hagley scholar and doctoral candidate in history at the University of Delaware, writing about environment, capitalism and gardens in the twentieth century United States.

Excerpt:

In this environment of uncertainty and competing priorities, the White House garden takes on newfound political symbolism. If Melania Trump continues the planting and harvest activities of Michelle Obama, she will be signalling support for organic agriculture, local food and school nutrition, all causes that ultimately demand radical revisions to American farm policy. To come out with sprayers of Sevin at hand before planting Roundup-Ready GMO corn, by contrast, would thrill President Trump’s far-right voting base and entrenched Republican agricultural interests, but would infuriate champions of improved nutrition and organic agriculture. To abandon the garden altogether would be interpreted as wanton disregard for children’s health on the part of the first lady: political suicide.

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April 4, 2018   Comments Off on How the White House garden became a political football

Chicago residents worry they’ll face food desert if community garden closes

The garden is home to 200 plots that yield enough organic produce for 300 homes

By Andrea Darlas,
Wgn9
March 27, 2018

Excerpt:

A group of Woodlawn gardeners say their South Side community could become a food desert if a popular community garden closes.

The garden near 65th Street and Woodlawn Avenue is home to 200 plots that yield enough organic produce for 300 homes, WGN’s Andrea Darlas reports. An estimated two tons of food is donated to local food pantries.

First Presbyterian Church, which owns the land, recently told gardeners the plots could soon close.

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April 4, 2018   Comments Off on Chicago residents worry they’ll face food desert if community garden closes