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Canada: Vancouver’s Rain City Strategy


City Farmer’s green roof is featured for a few seconds starting at [0.41].

City of Vancouver
March 2018

The City of Vancouver has set a target to capture and treat 90% of Vancouver’s average annual rainfall by using green infrastructure tools and design guidelines on public and private property.

In the natural environment, rain is absorbed and filtered by plants and soils. In cities, this natural water cycle is disrupted and rainwater flows across pavement and rooftops.

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April 9, 2018   Comments Off on Canada: Vancouver’s Rain City Strategy

Gaza: A garden for all—women and youth rebuild safe and inclusive spaces

From left: Samah Al-Nahal, Dalia Osama and Nihal Zourob are three female architects who completed the blueprint of the public garden in Al-Shoka neighborhood in collaboration with the community members. Photo: UN Women/Eunjin Jeong

The new garden will become a place where everyone in the neighbourhood— including women and girls—can use without the fear of harassment.

UN Women
March12, 2018

Excerpts:

Green, open spaces where everyone can convene, relax and take a break may be taken for granted in some parts of the world. For women and girls in Al-Shoka, a conflict affected neighbourhood in Gaza, this was a distant dream, until now. It took three female architects and a group of young people to rebuild the only public garden in Al-Shoka, since it was destroyed during the 2014 conflict. The architects sought feedback from the community to design the inclusive space, and for the first time, women and youth feel safe and excited about using the public garden.

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April 9, 2018   Comments Off on Gaza: A garden for all—women and youth rebuild safe and inclusive spaces

A chicken in every backyard: Urban poultry needs more regulation to protect human and animal health

U.S. Department of Agriculture. United States. Bureau of Animal Industry. Animal Husbandry Division, 1918

Nearly 1 percent of all U.S. households surveyed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture reported owning backyard fowl in 2013, and 4 percent more planned to start in the next five years.

By Catherine Brinkley, University of California, Davis and Jacqueline Kingsley, University of California, Davis
KiiiTV
Apr 3, 2018

Excerpt:

U.S. cities once were powered by animals. Horses provided transport through the early 1900s. Pigs and hens fed on household garbage before municipal trash collection became routine. Thousands of cattle were driven up Fifth Avenue in New York City daily in the late 19th century, occasionally trampling children and pedestrians.

To reduce accidents, disease and nuisances, such as piles of smelly manure and dead animals, early public health and planning agencies wrote the first ordinances banning urban livestock. By the 1920s, farm animals and related facilities such as dairies, piggeries and slaughterhouses were barred from most U.S. cities. Exceptions were made during World War I and World War II, when meat was rationed, encouraging city dwellers to raise backyard birds.

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April 9, 2018   Comments Off on A chicken in every backyard: Urban poultry needs more regulation to protect human and animal health

There’s an microgreens urban farm hiding in Brookline Village, Massachusetts named ‘Legitimate Farms’

Video by Multimedia Journalist Emma R. Murphy

Though just a two-man operation, the farm yields an impressive amount of food. With about 80 shelves of microgreens, the farm produces about 40 pounds of food a day, according to Becker.

By Emma R. Murphy
Wicked Local Brookline
Apr 3, 2018

Excerpt:

This is one of the beauties of microgreens, according to Becker. Rather than wait for the greens to mature to vegetables, the microgreens are ready for harvest in just days – 12 to 14 – and the flavor packs a bold punch.

“The flavor of the microgreen is the flavor of the whole plant concentrated in a tiny plant,” Becker said.

The pair also experiments with other plants and hopes to offer sunflower, which they described as “buttery, delicious and a complete protein.”

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April 9, 2018   Comments Off on There’s an microgreens urban farm hiding in Brookline Village, Massachusetts named ‘Legitimate Farms’