New Stories From 'Urban Agriculture Notes'
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Canada: De-Colonizing Local Ecology: Learning Medicinal And Food Uses Of Native Plants

Charles Dickens Elementary in Vancouver – The beginning of our project this year included designing and building a geodesic greenhouse. The students used applied skills criteria and Math to plan, design and build a working greenhouse. This greenhouse will be used to extend the growing season at our school.

Science World’s BC Green Games
2018

Excerpt:

Charles Dicken’s Elementary School has been working on an outdoor learning space for several years. The original building design included Leeds environmental criteria, which included a rooftop garden. Over the last few years we have been developing the outdoor garden into a dynamic learning space as part of a 3 year plan. This year our goal is to integrate aboriginal food and medicine plants into our outdoor learning space. Dickens has a long time running Green Team/ environmental club that includes year round activities.

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April 16, 2018   No Comments

China: Shanghai’s Suburban Farm on Chongming Island

One of Shen Hong’s farms, located in Xianqiao Town on Chongming Island, presents a bucolic scene of man and nature existing in harmony.

“Urban agriculture, like farming in suburban areas in big cities like Shanghai, is different from the traditional way of farming,” says Huang, an urban planner for more than 20 years. “It is aimed not only at fulfilling the need for food production, but also at providing local residents and urban consumers with a deeper understanding of how our daily lives relate to nature.”

By Yao Minji
Shine
Apr 11, 2018

Excerpt:

Like many modern farms in suburban Shanghai, Huang hosts workshops that are especially popular among families with children. Visitors can see how crops are grown organically and come to understand how somewhat higher costs of food are worth the knowledge that what we eat is safe and nutritious.

“The idea of sustainable farming depends heavily on consumers becoming more eco-minded,” Shen says. “We have forgotten the nature of agriculture. It is to supply nutrition and make you healthy. But consumers are typically driven by taste and price. For many years, most consumers have placed a higher priority on taste and low price than on quality and nutrition.”

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April 16, 2018   No Comments