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1943 WW2: He Plants for Victory

He Plants for Victory, , provided by the National Film Board of Canada

Canada’s National Film Board Short Animation

This animated short focuses on Mrs. Plugger, who is eager to start her own Victory Garden. Reminding her that tools are hard to get and that neither of them know much about gardening, Plugger organizes his neighbours to cultivate vegetables in a vacant lot. A message about the importance of cooperation and knowledge sharing . . . especially during war time.

May 2, 2018   Comments Off on 1943 WW2: He Plants for Victory

‘It’s more than just gardening’: Urban farming creates opportunity for job growth, food access

Gibron Jones founded HOSCO eight years ago to help provide training, education and expand urban farming food operations. Ashley Gieseking | Sauce Magazine

There are multiple ways to become involved. Whether it’s donating and supporting local farmers, or just coming out and lending a hand when it’s time to put some seeds in the ground,” she said.

By Lara Hamdan
St. Louis Public Radio
Apr 25, 2018

Excerpt:

Klene said urban farming includes growing crops in the city in “places you don’t expect,” such as vacant lots and rooftops.

“You don’t need 50 acres out in the country to start a farm. You can start a farm in your own backyard in the city,” Klene said. She added that “it’s more than just gardening,” since organizations like HOSCO use urban farming to create jobs.

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May 2, 2018   Comments Off on ‘It’s more than just gardening’: Urban farming creates opportunity for job growth, food access

Urban Agriculture Could Potentially Produce a Tenth of the World’s Food. Is Grass Really the Best Use for Your Yard?


Amanda Matson with husband Derek Ehrman and baby Elliot outside their home in Raleigh. Photo by Caitlin Penna.

There seems to be momentum behind the conviction that the collective cultivation of underutilized public spaces such as empty lots and rooftops just might save the world.

By Amanda Abrams
Indy
Apr 25, 2018

Excerpt:

But if urban agriculture gets people salivating, what about the other unoccupied patches of green right before us: private lawns, those monocultures that many Americans spend more than an hour a week manicuring even though they produce nothing useful? There are roughly forty million acres of lawn in the U.S., according to a 2015 NASA study—three times more acreage than any other irrigated crop. That’s a lot of land, and an enormous amount of lost potential. The average lawn is roughly a fifth of an acre, which doesn’t sound like much. But unlike big farms, gardens tend to be intensively managed, which means they can often yield an impressive amount of vegetables.

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May 2, 2018   Comments Off on Urban Agriculture Could Potentially Produce a Tenth of the World’s Food. Is Grass Really the Best Use for Your Yard?