New Stories From 'Urban Agriculture Notes'
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The Johnny Appleseed of South Minneapolis

Jeff Zeitler, co-founder of Urban Forage Winery and Cider House is on a mission to plant apple trees in backyards of South Minneapolis // Photos via Urban Forage Winery and Cider House.

Jeff Zeitler is planting a neighborhood urban orchard

By Lauren Sauer
Growler
May 4, 2018

Excerpt:

The idea to establish an orchard in the city has numerous benefits, one of which is the general absence of hungry deer. Unfortunately, he learned this lesson the hard way a few years back.

“I planted a bunch in the suburbs in a woody area, and they were all eaten by deer,” he recalls. “This is the third time I’m doing this, so I’m still learning as I go.” But in order to protect the trees from a common city menace—rabbits—Zeitler cages the bottom when they’re planted.

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May 11, 2018   No Comments

A Food Forest Grows in Atlanta

Lakewood-Browns Mill neighbors get ready for a guided hike during the Food Forest Festival. (City of Atlanta courtesy photo)

This project was conceived as part of a larger strategy to address food deserts, or low-income areas that lack fresh whole foods due to the absence of grocery stores.

Posted by Nausheen Iqbal
Cooperative Forestry, USDA Forest Service in Forestry
May 04, 2018

Excerpt:

This community forest utilizes agroforestry–agriculture that combines trees and shrubs with agricultural uses to create more healthy and productive land. The site already has a pecan orchard, black walnut trees, muscadine grapes, and fruit-producing blackberry brambles on site. This spring, the community will honor the local heritage by adding pawpaw trees that are native to the area.

Members of the Atlanta Public Schools Farm-to-School program are eager to incorporate this asset as an educational site. Students from two area schools within walking distance of the food forest have already shared their vision for what they would like to see grown there, with blackberries and grapes being the favorites.

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May 11, 2018   No Comments

The redemptive power of gardening: Insight from a pioneer’s work with ex-offenders

The Garden Project has expanded to include a public effort to engage youth and adults in the rehabilitative benefits of horticulture. Image Credit: The Garden Project

Center for a Livable Future hosts Cathrine Sneed, founder of The Garden Project

By Katie Pearce
HUB
May 4, 2015

Excerpt:

It all started with The Grapes of Wrath. Sneed found inspiration from the John Steinbeck classic while battling major kidney disease in 1982—a fatal case, doctors told her.

“I believe the message of book is that when people connect with land, they are hopeful,” Sneed said.

In the short time she believed she had left, Sneed—who was then working in legal services for the sheriff’s office—started a new program to put inmates to work reviving an abandoned farm on the property of the San Francisco County Jail.

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May 11, 2018   No Comments