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Category — Africa

Sudan: Urban Agriculture Facing Land Pressure in Greater Khartoum – The Case of New Real Estate Projects in Tuti and Abu Se ‘id

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Dr Alice Franck’s Presentation On Urban Agriculture At The Sudanese Institute Of Architects (SIA)’S 4Th Scientific And Professional Conference

On 23rd May, 2016, Dr Alice Franck, Geographer and Coordinator of CEDEJ Khartoum, presented her paper at the Sudanese Institute of Architects (SIA)’s 4th Scientific and Professional conference.

Excerpt from Abstract:

My initial research into this location of intense speculation examined the future of the central areas that remained under agricultural activity and how they were gradually being transformed into urban areas (Franck 2007). The approach adopted analysed the resistance of agriculture and farmers to the spread of real estate and the pressure of competition over land ownership. Five years later, the action in favour of urban plan renewal has been drastically intensified and the capacity for resistance severely diminished; three of the five market gardening areas (Tuti, Shambat, Abu Se’id, Abu Rof and Mogran) observed during fieldwork in 2001–5 are subject to huge real estate projects (Mogran, Abu Se’id and Tuti). In this chapter, I focus my analysis on how landowners and the entire agricultural sector can both adapt to and confront the transformation.

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May 26, 2016   No Comments

A local lady and scholar, Dr Hangwelani Hope Magidimisha, made history when she became the first black woman to get a PhD in Urban Planning at the University of Kwazulu Natal.

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phdladyDr Hangwelani Hope Magidimisha..

Her Masters Thesis: The responsiveness of town planning to urban agriculture in low-income neighbourhoods : a case study of Kwa-Mashu in Durban, South Africa.

Excerpt about her academic journey:

A resident of the rural Ngudza village, Magidimisha stated that her motivation to study and work hard came from her uneducated parents. “I am from a humble beginning with supportive parents and a supportive community,” she said. “When I was in Grade 12 at Ramugondo Secondary, our school achieved a 100% pass rate for the first time in history. We were a highly motivated class. This was also the motivation for me; it just proved to me that the sky is the limit.”

She indicated that hard work had always had a way of paying off. “If I work hard, anything is possible,” she beamed. “I like doing what people think is impossible. I guess this is something I got from my father.”

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May 6, 2016   Comments Off on A local lady and scholar, Dr Hangwelani Hope Magidimisha, made history when she became the first black woman to get a PhD in Urban Planning at the University of Kwazulu Natal.

Why urban agriculture isn’t a panacea for Africa’s food crisis

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sfrIn the last few years, Cape Town has witnessed the proliferation of hundreds of community gardens and urban farms.

It is clear that urban agriculture can have significant benefits for some participating households. But we are concerned about the absence of wider evidence supporting its potential to address food insecurity beyond those households.

By Gareth Haysom, Researcher at the African Centre for Cities, University of Cape Town
Jane Battersby, Senior Researcher in Urban Food Security and Food Systems, University of Cape Town
Economies
April 15, 2016

Excerpt:

Proponents of urban agriculture offer figures suggesting that as many as 40% of African urban residents are involved in some form of agriculture. Such figures require far greater interrogation. In the case of Cape Town in South Africa, research conducted in low-income areas of the city in 2008 found that less than 5% of poor residents were involved in any form of urban agriculture. In reality, those most active in urban agriculture were found to be wealthier people in low-income areas.

Context is a further determining factor. Research shows that in towns where the municipal boundary extended into areas with more rural characteristics, urban agriculture was higher.

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April 20, 2016   Comments Off on Why urban agriculture isn’t a panacea for Africa’s food crisis

Africa: Women in Kenya’s Mathare slum turn their tin roofs into vegetable gardens

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slrofA view of one part of Mathare.

Iron sheet farming and hanging gardens practised in Mathare and Korogocho slums are some of the urban farming techniques that are slowly adding to a raft of measures put in place to guarantee food security and nutrition in informal settlements.

By Ejidiah Wangui
African News
Xinhua
2016-04-13

Excerpt:

Behind overlapping shanties and overcrowded streets in the slums, is a novel roof gardening project that has been feeding over 100 households while providing income to slum women struggling to make ends meet at a time when food prices especially in urban areas have been on an unprecedented highs.

The “gardens”, Wamuhu said, are mounted on top of small structures, some as small as 10 by 10 meters, which are the standard structures in the area and which accommodate on average five family members.

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April 18, 2016   Comments Off on Africa: Women in Kenya’s Mathare slum turn their tin roofs into vegetable gardens

Uganda: Kampala City dwellers to be trained in urban farming

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kamplJournalists touring a Sukuma Wiki nusery bed in one of the greenhouses at Kampala Capital City Authority (KCCA) Agriculture Resource Center in Kyanja Kawempe division Kampala district. Photo by Lawrence Mulondo.

“The people, who have visited the resource centre, are already putting into practice what they learnt and their income has increased as they sell some of the produce they grow and animals they keep.”

By Lawrence Mulondo
New Vision
8th April 2016

Excerpt:

Galukande explained that urban farming will solve the unemployment problem in the city.

The centre sits on 31 acres of land with over five projects, including poultry, piggery and modernised fish ponds, vegetables including tomato, sweet pepper and sukumawiki all grown in green houses.

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April 14, 2016   Comments Off on Uganda: Kampala City dwellers to be trained in urban farming

Urban fish farming makes sense in Harare, Zimbabwe

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Tilapia eat algae, weeds, vegetable scraps and bugs. Mulauzi says, “My fish survive on algae. I develop algae for them using chicken manure.

By Sharon Mazingaizo
Harare News
Mar 16, 2016

Excerpt:

Alfred Mulauzi (44) walks around his garden with pride, looking over his fish pond filled with bream. Mulauzi is an urban fish farmer and keen gardener who lives in Rhodesville with his wife and three children. He completed training in fish farming to improve his livelihood whilst providing a healthy and affordable source of protein to feed his family.

Mulauzi tends to his pond, which contains over 200 tilapia, with knowledge and passion.

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April 11, 2016   Comments Off on Urban fish farming makes sense in Harare, Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe: Bulawayo’s Largest Community Garden

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Bongo captured helping one of the widows putting final touches on a tomatoes bed. Pic By Chrispen Tabvura.

Young at Heart Foundation last weekend carried out a surprise visit to the largest nutritional garden in Bulawayo which is based on a new local ownership scheme to enhance its value to the beneficiaries.

By Chrispen Tabvura
ZDDT Field Correspondent
Mar 8, 2016

Excerpt:

It is mostly run by widows and the disadvantaged in the community of Tshabalala and Sizinda townships.

The two visitors from Young at Heart Foundation, received a warm welcome as they were handed some fruit trees as a gesture of their welcome.

“We are pleased to be visited by you, and this year has been signalling our success. We have been receiving visitors from all over the world and, just today, you have opened our 2016 guest list with a refreshing word of entertainment. Thank you. Please come this weekend for that show.”

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April 10, 2016   Comments Off on Zimbabwe: Bulawayo’s Largest Community Garden

A Television Series on Urban Farming for South Africa’s 15 Member Region

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(Must see video. Mike)

In development: Urban Farming – Growing Food in the City

By David Reeler, Mike Davies, Simon De Swardt

“We feel that Southern Africa has it’s own unique problems and therefore needs it’s own solutions. Southern African Development Community (SADC) has 15 member Countries with a population of 300 million (the same as the U.S.A.), half of which live in the cities. We hope to show how that growing some food yourself will lead to a healthier lifestyle.”

Excerpt from their concept sheet.

As rural to urban migration intensifies, Urban farming is becoming an important aspect of life in many cities across the world, but particularly in Southern Africa. It contributes significantly to improved nutrition, poverty alleviation, the empowerment of women, and community development.

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April 7, 2016   Comments Off on A Television Series on Urban Farming for South Africa’s 15 Member Region

Bulawayo, Zimbabwe: Irrigation Schemes Helping Urban Farmers Escape Hunger

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zimbuUrban farmers in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe.

A number of residents in the city, especially in western suburbs, have formed cooperatives to practise irrigation/gardening using borehole water.

By Dumisani Nyoni
Radio VOP
March 8, 2016

Excerpt:

A recent survey by RadioVOP revealed that irrigation was now a growing trend among some communities like Tshabalala, Sizinda, Magwegwe North, Emakhandeni, Old Pumula and Nkulumane, to stave off hunger.

In the city’s eastern suburbs, the trend was common in Richmond, Mahatshula and Fig Tree.

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March 14, 2016   Comments Off on Bulawayo, Zimbabwe: Irrigation Schemes Helping Urban Farmers Escape Hunger

Africa: Community gardens in Gambia increase sense of ownership

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Kinkeling Community Garden.

The Governor of the North Bank Region has said the establishment of community gardens as an alternative source of livelihood will help bring people together from a wide variety of backgrounds (age, race, culture, social class), and can lead to community-based efforts to deal with other social concerns.

By Yai Dibba
The Point
Feb 24, 2016

Excerpt:

Governor Jammeh pointed out that community gardens provide a significant source of food, income, and access to nutritionally-rich foods that may otherwise be unavailable to low-income families and individuals.

He said it is an open secret that community gardeners and their families eat healthier vegetable and diets than non-gardening families, and directly involve people in processes that provide food security and alleviate hunger.

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March 2, 2016   Comments Off on Africa: Community gardens in Gambia increase sense of ownership

South Africa: Vegetable Gardens Critical for School Feeding Scheme

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Xolisa Bangani, founder of the Ikhaya Food Garden at Isikhokele Primary School in Site C, Khayelitsha. Photo: Siyavuya Khaya.

“We have 32 orphans and we frequently give them food from the garden. The number of absentees has dropped significantly, because students know that they are going to eat at school,” she says.

By Siyavuya Khaya
Ground Up
Feb 16, 2016

Excerpt:

Bangani said they grow eggplant, spinach, beetroot, pumpkin, green beans and they also have fruit trees. He says the garden is small, but they utilize the space effectively.

Luleka Primary School principal Gcobani Mthoba says the budget for their school feeding scheme is severely strained by rising food prices. The garden also creates some employment for the community.

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February 24, 2016   Comments Off on South Africa: Vegetable Gardens Critical for School Feeding Scheme

Tanzanian shoppers snap up urban grown vegetables despite polluted water warnings

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Women selling vegetables at local market in Tanzania. Credit V. Afari-sefa AVRDC.

Food safety authorities recently warned that Dar es Salaam residents who eat vegetables grown in the urban gardens may be exposed to health risks caused by the waste matter and industrial spills contaminating the farms’ water supply.

By Kizito Makoye
Reuters Africa
Feb 10, 2016

Excerpt:

Shoppers buying fresh vegetables from the maze of stalls at Dar es Salaam’s Kariakoo market have no idea of the risks they are taking, but food safety officials are alarmed by the chemicals and effluent in the water used on the city’s urban farms.

Doreen Nkya always buys some spinach or amaranth on her way home because she considers them an important part of her family’s diet. “I like vegetables because they are healthy. We don’t often go without them at our dinner table,” she said.

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February 14, 2016   Comments Off on Tanzanian shoppers snap up urban grown vegetables despite polluted water warnings

NEFSALF: Nairobi (Kenya) and Environs Food Security, Agriculture and Livestock Forum

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City and environs agriculture and livestock keeping enhance urban food security and improve well-being, income, skill and knowledge of those who practice it.

Bulletins
See all 2005 to present

Via Diana Lee-Smith

In Nairobi we have the Nairobi and Environs Food Security, Agriculture and Livestock Forum (NEFSALF) which is a network of small farmers in and around the city. Most farmers produce food on less than an acre (although a few have a bit more space, often made up of different plots farmed opportunistically in different places). Typically, they keep small livestock for food and sale of livestock products and grow vegetables for both consumption and sale.

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January 26, 2016   Comments Off on NEFSALF: Nairobi (Kenya) and Environs Food Security, Agriculture and Livestock Forum

Antananarivo Urban Commune, Madagascar: adapting to climate change through urban farming and organic waste recovery

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We would like to widely share the benefits of urban farming, especially in large cities in the South

France Diplomatie
Jan 12, 2016
(Must see. Mike)

Excerpt:

Tamara Teissedre-Philip : The project is based on a platform of development actors who incorporate urban farming into their respective action frameworks, to reduce the risk of food insecurity in the most vulnerable communities. A proposal on urban organic waste recovery is being drawn up.

What solution have you highlighted for combating climate change?

The practice of urban farming mitigates the impacts of climate change by:

lowering greenhouse gas emissions through reduced transport of foodstuffs, self-sufficiency and short supply chains;

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January 16, 2016   Comments Off on Antananarivo Urban Commune, Madagascar: adapting to climate change through urban farming and organic waste recovery

Kenya: Kitchen Gardens Are Victory Gardens in Boosting Nutrition and Incomes in Western Kenya

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scren
One of the Muchui members (right) discusses her garden with Rosemary Herbert and two of the Muchui Directors.

A kitchen garden is an area in a homestead where leafy vegetables, fruit or herbs are grown.

By Justus Wanzala
All Africa
Dec 30, 2015

Excerpt:

“Indigenous vegetables fetch better prices compared to exotic ones like kales and cabbages because many people have learnt from experts that they are highly nutritious. It’s a pity they have been ignored by the local community,” she said.

Members of her group plant Indian spinach, jute, crotalaria, solanum, spider plant, amaranth, pumpkin leaves, and African kale. Each of their member has enough for family consumption and for sale.

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January 4, 2016   Comments Off on Kenya: Kitchen Gardens Are Victory Gardens in Boosting Nutrition and Incomes in Western Kenya