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Category — Aquaculture

Hong Kong’s fish farms in the sky

fishhk
Lloyd Moskalik sells two tonnes of fish to wholesalers each week.

This is because as one of the most densely populated places in the world, there is simply very little spare space. So fish farms have to fit in where they can.

By Peter Shadbolt
BBC News
April 2, 2014

Excerpt:

There are 11 plastic tanks in total, holding a combined 80,000 litres of salt water.

They are full of grouper, a white-fleshed fish, which are all destined to end up on the plates of restaurant-goers across Hong Kong.

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April 10, 2014   No Comments

Aquaponics Brings Fish to Farm to Table in Tampa, Florida

aquasustThe New Auqaponics System At Sustainable Living Project. Photo by Julie Branaman.

“The purpose of having several different grow systems is to show people as many different ways as possible to grow things.”

By Jan Hollingsworth
83 Degrees
March 18, 2014

Excerpt:

Will Carey has spent most of his life feeding people — first as a chef, later as executive director of Tampa Bay Harvest, an organization that gleans and distributes farm and restaurant food that would otherwise be thrown away.

But these days he’s also committed to teaching people to feed themselves, a mission ripe for fruition as the urban farming movement takes root in cities across the nation.

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March 25, 2014   Comments Off

Aquaponics – Growing Gardens in Calgary

calhydro
Scott Weir started Growing Gardens in Calgary, an urban farm that uses Small Plot Intensive Agriculture (SPIN).

Small setups let you grow fresh tomatoes and tilapia year-round

By Chris Dela Torre
CBC News
Feb 13, 2014

Excerpt:

For most people, urban agriculture might mean a small vegetable garden in the backyard. But early adopters of aquaponics are taking things a step further, investing start-up costs of about $300 and using the food production system to grow vegetables and harvest fresh fish in their homes.

Calgary-based Scott Weir, founder of Growing Gardeners Aquaponic and Urban Farms, travels the continent speaking about aquaponics. He calls it the merging of aquaculture — the raising of fish, usually edible fish — and hydroponics, or the soil-less growing of plants.

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February 19, 2014   Comments Off

Milwaukee Public School system will expand its aquaponics program after receiving a grant of $98,000 from AT&T

aqumil
The aquaponics classroom and greenhouse at Bradley Tech High School. (Photo courtesy of MPS)

“Technology (will) be the driving force of our new economy and we know that STEM(science, technology, engineering and mathematics) education is really vital to preparing the next generation of workers.”

By Natalie Wickman
Neighborhood New Service Milwaukee
January 31, 2014

Excerpt:

Rochelle Sandrin, an aquaponics sustainability teacher at Bradley Tech, said her class is based on hands-on and project work, which students often find more exciting than a traditional science class.

“(Student spend) time learning about food needs and food deserts and how that can impact health and lifestyle,” Sandrin said. “Then we learn about urban agriculture, urban farming and the components of aquaponics before students construct and run their own (aquaponics) systems.”

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February 10, 2014   Comments Off

Chicago warehouse urban farm focusing on aquaponics

The aquaponics center can harvest up to 30,000 pounds of fish a year

By Natalie Moore
WBEZ 91.5
January 24, 2014

In a former shoe warehouse on 96th and Cottage Grove, Chicago State University professor Emmanuel Pratt has turned a former shoe warehouse into an urban farm focusing on aquaponics.

What exactly is aquaponics? High school senior Seville Bell, a volunteer at the space, explains.

“Poop from the fish goes into this little tube and feed the nutrients to the plant and helps it grow and the plant cleans the water and goes back to the fish tank. I like that part because it’s about recycling. You’re not using a lot of water or cleaning the fish tank.”

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February 8, 2014   Comments Off

Hell’s Kitchen School Raises 10,000 Fish in Basement in Manhattan, New York

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Philson Warner holds a giant oregano leaf in his lab at Food and Finance High School. Photo credit: DNAinfo/Mathew Katz.

In all, the school already sells about $120,000 in fish per year.

By Mathew Katz
DNA Info New York
January 29, 2014

Excerpt:

A manmade river flows under Food and Finance High School, where more than 10,000 tilapia swim against the current just like they would in the wild.

The school’s basement is home to Cornell University scientist Philson Warner’s aquaculture lab, where he and public high school students raise enough fish to feed an army.

The tilapia — housed in 10 circular tubs containing about 1,000 fish each — swim in wide circles day and night in water that flows at between 75 to 150 gallons per minute.

[Read more →]

February 6, 2014   Comments Off

Chicago adopts eco-friendly vertical farming

The City is trying a novel approach to grow crops indoors and help meet demand

By John Hendren
Aljazeera
14 Dec 2013

America’s midwest is one of the great agricultural zones of the world. The wheat, corn and soybean fields feed millions around the world.

And to help meet demand, farmers are trying a novel approach – they’re growing their crops indoors.

December 21, 2013   Comments Off

An Aquaponics Lab in Baltimore, MD

Greater Yield Part Four: The Future of Food

By Andrew Cook
Co-Lab Radio
December 12th 2013

Excerpt:

This week’s post visits an aquaponics lab in Baltimore, MD run by the Johns Hopkins Center for A Livable Future. While the lab’s focus is on education and research, many people are looking to aquaponics as an emerging tool for large-scale, sustainable food production. Farm manager Laura Genello explains how their system works, what it’s advantages are over traditional growing techniques, and what some challenges are that still need to be dealt with.

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December 18, 2013   Comments Off

Garden Fresh Farms wins CleanTech’s National Sustainability Award

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Started in 2010, Garden Fresh Farms is building a nationwide network of investor-owned, inner-city indoor hydroponic farms

Excerpt from their website:

We have proven that urban agriculture is sustainable in a warehouse environment. We want to help others reach for their dream and replicate Garden Fresh Farms in large urban areas. Imagine owning your own business that is “green”, natural, local and healthy. In any economy people have to eat and with the rise in gas prices, consumer purchases of locally produced products will increase.

Helping the Urban Farmer: We are making owning an urban farm within reach of the passive investor who believe in the future of indoor agriculture, wants to be part of the growth, but doesn’t want to quite their day job.

[Read more →]

December 4, 2013   Comments Off

Urban farmers grow in small space in Victoria, BC

victang
Mason Street Farm partners Jesse Brown, left, and Angela Moran (with her four-year-old daughter, Ruby) inside the farm’s new aquaponics greenhouse. Moran and Brown hope to raise at least $10,000 for a new solar panel system and intern training program through a fundraising dinner.

“A massive amount of food can be grown in a small space, and that’s what people want.”

By Daniel Palmer
Victoria News
October 28, 2013

Excerpt:

Above the fish are long troughs filled with porous pumice stones, while sprouting green leaves and vines push their way up towards the greenhouse’s opaque roof.

The process is a closed-loop water system that allows farmers to grow plants and vegetables without soil and recycles more than 90 per cent of the collected rainwater. Fish excrement provides necessary nutrients to the plants, and the resulting plant run-off is then pumped back into the water tank carrying bacterial nutrients for the fish.

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November 27, 2013   Comments Off

Aquaponics in Gaza

aqugaza

The project will continue to focus on female producers offering the means for them to secure fresh, nutritious food and potentially generate a supplemental income for their family.

By Christopher Somerville and Cyril Ferrand
Field Report/Emergency Nutrition Network
Sept 2013 Issue 46

Excerpts:

Initial results
The initial 15 rooftop aquaponics units showed some promising results. Most of the beneficiaries exerted considerable effort into the management of their units and most harvested a summer crop that was used for household consumption. For some beneficiaries, it reduced the need to purchase food (such as tomatoes, peppers, eggplants) in local markets. Others paid less attention to reaching the full production potential of their units and concentrated more on growing some of their favourite herbs and vegetables. Every beneficiary mentioned that they thoroughly enjoyed managing their units.

[Read more →]

November 11, 2013   Comments Off

Hyundai Unveils World’s First Aquaponics Farm Powered by a Fuel Cell Car

hyaund
Click on image for larger size.

‘This installation is an imaginative way to bring alive the huge potential of hydrogen technology’, stated Kit Malthouse, Deputy Mayor of London for Business and Enterprise and Chairman of the London Hydrogen Partnership.

By Marc Carter
Inhabit
10/23/13

Excerpt:

Hyundai just teamed up with Something & Son to unveil the world’s first urban aquaponic farm ‘powered’ by a hydrogen car! Located outside of the London Design Museum, Hyundai’s Fuel Cell Farm seeks to educate the public on the benefits of hydrogen fuel cell technology. The aquaponics farm filters water produced by a ix35 fuel cell vehicle and then uses the H2O to sustain an aquarium full of fish and an edible garden.

[Read more →]

November 3, 2013   Comments Off

The Aqualibrium Garden – ‘The Future of Food’

Imagine a closed-loop ecosystem that can fit anywhere… offering the freedom to grow food year round.

From their Kickstarter site:

Inspired by the designs of futurist Jacque Fresco, the Aqualibrium Garden is modular, sturdy and very stylish. You will have the option of leaving the lower chamber fish tank open (as shown in the above drawing)… or closed by using the four removable clear doors included with each garden. This is a great option for homes with pets and small children.

Although our prototype (as featured in our Kickstarter video) is white, the Aqualibrium production model will be manufactured using clear, UV protected, scratch resistant plastic and will be shipped fully assembled… ready to fill with water, fish, grow medium and plants… perfect for either aquaponics or hydroponics growing.

[Read more →]

October 11, 2013   Comments Off

£500,000 aquaponic farm on a rooftop in the city of Basel in Switzerland

drva
Dr Valentini Pappa, an SRUC (Scotland’s Rural College) researcher currently working with Zurich University of Applied Science.

The system will provide 60kg of fish and 120kg of vegetables annually.

Farming UK
27-09-2013

Excerpt:

In a presentation given by Dr Valentini Pappa, an SRUC researcher currently working with Zurich University of Applied Science, the possibilities and practicalities of urban farming were explored. Dr Pappa’s team helped develop a £500,000 aquaponic farm on a rooftop in the city of Basel in Switzerland with the aim of studying how successful the system could be.

Aquaponic farms combine fish breeding and vegetable growing in a no soil hydroponic system. They produce little to no waste, require minimal fertilisers or pesticides and can produce crops throughout the year.

[Read more →]

October 2, 2013   Comments Off

Big empty swimming pool turned into abundant food garden

Garden Pool from Dark Rye on Vimeo.

A sustainable oasis in the suburban desert – Phoenix, Arizona

By Dark Rye magazine
Roots No. 3
The video from Dark Rye was produced by Angus Cann and Ira Chute and edited by Andy Pickard.
(Must see. Mike)

Excerpt:

When the McClungs purchased their first home, it came with a run-down old swimming pool. Rather than spend thousands of dollars fixing it up with chlorine and spanish tile (like everybody else), Dennis saw an opportunity. He designed and built a nearly self-sufficient suburban farm in one of the most unlikely locations imaginable. Now, instead of sitting inside in front of the TV, Dennis’ kids are out in the Garden Pool turning the interplay of chicken droppings, algae sludge, tilapia fish, miniature goats, and clay pellets into a damned fine feast—with 50-70% less money, 90% less water, and about 400% more freshness.

[Read more →]

May 28, 2013   1 Comment