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Category — Asia

Korea’s first school to teach farming to retirees who come from cities

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koreoldThe first students to enroll in a school that teaches farming to retirees from urban areas pose in front of their dormitory in Yeongju, North Gyeongsang. [GONG JEONG-SIK]

The Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, North Gyeongsang Provincial Government and Yeongju City Government spent about 2 billion won ($1.7 million) building the school, which allows retirees to better settle into rural areas.

By Song Yee-Ho
Korea Joining Daily
July 16, 2016

Excerpt:

The students mostly learn practical agricultural skills such as how to make and manage fertilizers, cultivate farmland and use farming machines. The school also owns small parcels of land where students can practice growing different crops.

The students were also paired up with senior farmers who grow the crops they are interested in growing themselves. They visited their mentor’s farms and also went to historic places such as Buseok Temple.

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July 20, 2016   No Comments

Farming your own food in Singapore with actor-singer Nat Ho

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ho
Farmer Nat Ho. Photo: Jason Ho

Ho’s takeaway is that stuff you grow yourself tastes better.

By May Seah
Today
July 9, 2016

Excerpt:

One person who has embraced the hobby is actor-singer Nat Ho, who earned himself the nickname “Farmer Ho”, thanks to his off-the-beaten-track pastime of HDB flat gardening.

“Dawn Yeoh was the first one to give me that nickname,” said the Tanglin actor, who cultivates his own cherry tomatoes, chye sim, chilli and mint in his apartment. “It seems like such an ah pek thing to do, right? But I was telling my friends about it and some of them actually started their own gardens, too.”

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July 15, 2016   No Comments

Vietnam’s Hoi An offers unique farming experience to eco-tourists

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watervA tourist waters vegetable beds in the Tra Que vegetable village, Hoi An City, with instructions from a local farmer. Photo: Tuoi Tre. Click on image for larger file.

Long known for its century-old ancient town and one-of-a-kind delicacies, Hoi An City in central Vietnam has been gaining popularity among green-fingered tourists with its eco-tours that guarantee full immersion in the agricultural lifestyle of rural Vietnam.

Tuoi Tre News
06/26/2016

Excerpt:

After a tour around Hoi An Ancient Town, a group of young tourists from the UK and Ukraine decided to hop on rented bicycles to explore the Tra Que vegetable village with their own eyes, ears, and hands.

Arriving at the village at 4:00 in the afternoon, the group paid for a homestay house situated only 300 meters from the vegetable fields to spend the night, determined to hit them at first light the next morning.

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June 29, 2016   Comments Off on Vietnam’s Hoi An offers unique farming experience to eco-tourists

Promoting farm to table lifestyle in Daveo, Philippines

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daveoDaveo. Urban gardening at Minkah’s, planted with various herbs, mints and vegetables promoting farm to table lifestyle. (Ace June Rell S. Perez)

The kitchen serves a wide array of delectable food offerings. The fresh garden salad with balsamic vinaigrette that had blue ternate and bougainvillea flowers, cajun kamote fries, chicken Tinola with gata, spareribs, Pinakbet, steamed malasugue, spicy shrimp pasta, Crostini with three cheese, tomato and basil pasta, crispy pata and fried lechon

By Ace June Rell S. Perez
Sunstar
June 19, 2019

Excerpt:

“Going organic makes good business and good to customers’ healthy lifestyle,” Jasmen Evasco, owner of Minkah’s Kitchen, said in an interview with Sun.Star Davao Saturday morning.

“We sourced most of the ingredients to the food we offer in the restaurant from the urban garden,” she added.

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June 25, 2016   Comments Off on Promoting farm to table lifestyle in Daveo, Philippines

Hong Kong’s rooftop farmers grow vegetables… and communities

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hkandrewAndrew Tsui, co-founder of Rooftop Republic. Photo: Vincent Assante di Cupillo.

Hong Kong, this busy city of 7 million people, as a place of poverty, want and need. Some kind of crisis seems to be developing. Statistics suggest that the city has the widest income gap, between rich and poor, of any developed country in the world.

By Roger Hill
Hong Kong Free Press
19 June 2016

Excerpt:

Each growing project has its own character. The roof of the Fringe Club is dedicated to herbs and vegetables: basil, rosemary, mint, lemon-balm, okra, cucumbers and spinach. Rooftop Republic work with local chefs and some of these crops go to local restaurants, so if you have consumed a particularly tasty meal or cocktail in Central it may be thanks to this rooftop-farm.

Other produce goes to the foodbanks in the city, and Rooftop Republic runs projects with schools which allow students to take home some of the fruits of their curricular studies in science and biology. Similarly the project runs training and workshops for local participants who can enjoy the rewards of their growing labours.

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June 25, 2016   Comments Off on Hong Kong’s rooftop farmers grow vegetables… and communities

Restoring Urban Fringe Landscapes through Urban Agriculture: The Japanese Experience

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“As for food, such was the primacy of urban agriculture, fruit and vegetables were named after the Edo suburbs known for producing them.”

Prof. Dr. Makoto Yokoharia, Marco Amatib, Jay Bolthousec & Hideharu Kuritad
The Planning Review
Volume 46, Issue 181, 2010
Special Issue: Metropolitan Peripheries
pages 51-59

Abstract:

This paper advocates the re-establishment of garden zones both in and around cities. Mixed land-use garden zones are conceptualized as spaces where urban residents can craft their own local food cultures and agro-biographies in response to the globalization of agriculture and food consumption. The case for creating garden zones is made by first outlining the legacy of post-war growth and planning policies, which attempted to clearly demarcate the line between urban and agricultural use. And, second, investigating the current demographic shifts which threaten the existence of domestic agricultural production and necessitate a new pro-urban agriculture planning paradigm. To develop this new planning paradigm, the third section looks back at the city of Edo to identify the urban agricultural heritage of what is now the modern-day megalopolis of Tokyo.

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June 22, 2016   Comments Off on Restoring Urban Fringe Landscapes through Urban Agriculture: The Japanese Experience

Steady growth in Singapore’s community gardening movement

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cosingTampines Greenvale Residents’ Committee Community Garden, a Platinum-banded garden that was also conferred a Diamond Award for achieving its third Platinum band. (Photo: NParks) Click on image for larger file.

This year’s Community in Bloom (CIB) Awards saw 436 community gardens take part, the highest number of participating gardens in its 12-year history.

Channel News Asia
June 16, 2016

Excerpt:

Out of the 436 participating gardens – which comprises almost half of all community gardens in Singapore – 213 were from the public housing category, 37 from private housing, 113 from educational institutions and 73 from organisations.

“I am heartened to see that the gardeners’ love for gardening has brought them closer to one another. As the Community in Bloom network expands even further, we now regularly see gardeners from one neighbourhood helping out at gardens in other neighbourhoods, forging even more ties,” said Chief Judge of the CIB Awards 2016 and President of the Singapore Gardening Society Tan Jiew Hoe.

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June 20, 2016   Comments Off on Steady growth in Singapore’s community gardening movement

Loo Urban Farm in Penang, Malaysia

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loo

Sustainable Non-Toxic Aquaponics Green Vertical Urban Farming

From their website:

Loo Urban Farm, started by Philip Loo, with the initial aim to sustainably produce healthy food for our own consumption. It has then grown and evolved to be a social enterprise that will enable every home to sustainably produce self-sufficient, fresh and healthy food globally.

We continue to innovate, build and distribute our advance and efficient planting system. We educate and lead society as a whole to produce their fresh and healthy food at home or in a community.

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June 19, 2016   Comments Off on Loo Urban Farm in Penang, Malaysia

Mr. Danilo Agliam – Gold Award, Outstanding Urban Farmer of the Philippines, 2014

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farphil

The benefits of Mr. Agliam’s urban farming practice and knowledge generated all these years has been an object of interest shared locally and internationally. Exchange urban farmers and students from Korea, Taiwan and Japan spent time in Baguio City learning with and from him.

By Robert Domoguen
SunStar
June 14, 2016

Excerpt:

For years, he has been growing vegetables, fruits and root crops at the rooftop of a four-story building that you reach by climbing stairs from the bottom. I have been there once some three years ago and the climb was not a problem then. I agreed to visit him later in the week, and to reach that goal, I already imagine myself moving about with dainty and luscious vegetables up in the sky.

My friend constructed a 6×8 meter greenhouse that allows him to rotate the growing and harvesting of vegetables every month. Under open field farming, vegetables are grown and harvested in three to six months.

Mr. Danilo Agliam grows both pakbet (tomatoes, eggplant, bitter gourd, kabatete and upo) and chopsuey (lettuce, potatoes, spinach, aurogola, pakchoi pechay, Japanese mustard) types of vegetables.

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June 18, 2016   Comments Off on Mr. Danilo Agliam – Gold Award, Outstanding Urban Farmer of the Philippines, 2014

Korea: Cooking class features fresh greens from urban farm

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sankorA sandwich using arugula and tomato from the urban farm near Gwangheungchang Station.

The city aims to expand urban farmland from the current 141 hectares to 165 hectares by the end of this year. The farms are scattered along the Han River, mountain slopes, rooftops and school properties.

By Kim Sejeong
Korea Times
June 6, 2016

Excerpts:

The urban farming policy reflects Mayor Park Won-soon’s keen interest in sustainable living amid the growing threat of climate change. Under his leadership, the city is harnessing renewable energy sources to generate electricity, instead of consuming fossil fuels.

The rooftop garden is almost 115 square meters and grows peppermint, arugula, tomatoes, radish, green onions and potatoes. In one corner stands a greenhouse for radishes.

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June 11, 2016   Comments Off on Korea: Cooking class features fresh greens from urban farm

Growing crops on rooftops in Korea

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koread
A rooftop farm run by the urban farming organization Pajeori is located on the top floor of a four-story office building, surrounded by high-rise apartment buildings in Mapo-gu, Seoul. (Courtesy of Pajeori)

Urban farmers on the rise, with more city dwellers seek healthy food and comfort in farming

By Lee Woo-young
Korean Herald
June 3, 2016

Excerpt:

At Dari, another rooftop farm near Hongik University Station, some 40 members own “boxes” of land on the rooftop of the Catholic Youth Center in Mapo-gu, Seoul.

Each member is allocated a box-sized space where they can grow crops. Popular ones include tomatoes, paprika, ginger, eggplants and rucola, according to Park Jeong-ja, an urban farmer and educator, who manages the place.

“The reason people turn rooftops into farms is that there is no available space on the ground for farming in the city. If you have a spare piece of land in the city, it’s considered a source of investment, not a farm,” said Park.

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June 7, 2016   Comments Off on Growing crops on rooftops in Korea

Malaysia: Millennials flee the city to get hands dirty as farmers

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2malas
Alicia Koh and Loi Meishy belong to a new generation of farmers who have left the big cities for a life on the land. (Photo: Ray Yeh)

About two years ago, Ms Koh decided to give up her work in Singapore and “just moved to Malaysia” to pursue farm work full-time.

By Ray Yeh
A Channel News
23 May 2016

Excerpt:

PENANG: When she graduated from the University of Science, Malaysia with a degree in special education, instead of embarking on a career in the classroom, Loi Meishy packed up her things and moved out of the city.

On the outskirts of Penang Island, on a small plot of land leased from the state government, Ms Loi began a new life in 2013 with two friends who got tired of the rat race, and “wanted to try something new”.

That “something new” involved trading their polished shoes for work boots and getting their hands dirty: Organic farming.

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May 27, 2016   Comments Off on Malaysia: Millennials flee the city to get hands dirty as farmers

Malaysia: Urban farming has helped cut living costs says Agriculture and Agro-based Industry Minister

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malaysDatuk Seri Ahmad Shabby Cheek.

Since its inception in 2014, the programme has amassed 38,506 participants who grow vegetables, herbs and ulam at 1,634 locations nationwide.

By Nurbaiti Hamdan
The Star
May 19, 2016

PETALING JAYA: The Government-initiated agriculture programme in urban areas is turning into a movement that helps to reduce the cost of living, said Datuk Seri Ahmad Shabery Cheek.

Since its inception in 2014, the programme has amassed 38,506 participants who grow vegetables, herbs and ulam at 1,634 locations nationwide.

“This was something unthinkable because previously, urban people were thought to only work in factories, offices and hotels,” he said in his speech during a working visit to the Petaling Jaya urban farming site in Kampung Lindungan here Thursday.

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May 24, 2016   Comments Off on Malaysia: Urban farming has helped cut living costs says Agriculture and Agro-based Industry Minister

This Indonesian Startup Lets City Dwellers Play FarmVille In Real Life

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infro

Help a local farmer invest in seeds and watch your investment bear fruit.

By Adele Peters
Co-Exist
05.18.16

Excerpt:

Someone living in a high-rise in Jakarta may not have a balcony, let alone a garden plot for growing food. But an Indonesian startup is working to turn city dwellers into virtual farmers: Through the platform, called iGrow, someone can invest in seeds for an underemployed farmer in a rural area, and then get regular updates as the food grows. When the crop is sold, seed investors share in the profits.

“The main thing is [to] create food security for all people,” says founder Iqbal Muhaimin. “We want people to participate in food security by making them say, ‘I grew my own food.'”

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May 23, 2016   Comments Off on This Indonesian Startup Lets City Dwellers Play FarmVille In Real Life

Urban farm gives fresh start to youth and homeless in Christchurch, New Zealand

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chrzCultivate Christchurch hopes to scale up in the coming months after gaining access to two larger sites.

“As a young person, it’s really hard to get into employment if you don’t have either the networks or qualifications or haven’t had to practice those skills,” Stewart said.

By Alice Cannet
The Press
April 25 2016

Excerpt:

One of Cultivate’s volunteers had been out of work and education for seven years before joining the group.

She had since put spent nearly 100 hours in the garden in the last three months and was studying horticulture at the National Trades Academy.

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April 28, 2016   Comments Off on Urban farm gives fresh start to youth and homeless in Christchurch, New Zealand