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Category — Bees

Building a Beehive for $60 in materials

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The directions below detail construction of the hive’s base and inner and outer covers, plus five supers for collecting honey

By Cam Pauli
Modern Farmer
January 14, 2016

Excerpt:

Take advantage of winter downtime and start your beekeeping venture now, before the pollinators become available for delivery in early spring. Assuming you possess basic carpentry skills—and the tools that typically accompany them—this weekend project will set you back about $60 in materials (compared with $125 to $150 for a store-bought beehive).

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January 29, 2016   Comments Off on Building a Beehive for $60 in materials

Hives for Humanity: The Bee Space in Vancouver, BC

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Hives For Humanity from Nick Quenville on Vimeo.

“I love the gardens, they keep me busy, keep me outta trouble, outta jail. It used to be “Hey Doc, where’ve you been?” – “Jail” – Now it’s been years since I was in. Used to be every year. I love the flowers. And the honey. I love to water the plants. And the bees are alright!” – Doc

Sarah / Julia /
Cassie Hives for Humanity
Funding proposal

Hives for Humanity is a non-profit organization, creating meaningful change for pollinators and for people in the Downtown Eastside (DTES) of Vancouver, and beyond. We started with the very simple idea that in helping the bees we could help each other. Since then we’ve been working to connect people to nature, to each other, and to themselves.

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November 30, 2015   Comments Off on Hives for Humanity: The Bee Space in Vancouver, BC

Cover Cropping for Pollinators and Beneficial Insects

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Flowering broadleaf species are a must when selecting cover crops for pollinators. Grass cover crops do not provide nectar and their pollen typically has lower protein content than the pollen of broadleaf plants, thus making them only marginally attractive to bees.

This bulletin was co-written by Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation staff members Eric Lee-Mader, Anne Stine, Jarrod Fowler, Jennifer Hopwood and Mace Vaughan, with contributions from the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS).
SARE – 16 pages
Nov. 2015

Flowering cover crops can fulfill their original purpose as a conservation practice while at the same time providing valuable forage for wild bees and beneficial insects. This added benefit can be significantly enhanced with some fine-tuning of management practices and thoughtful plant selection.

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November 28, 2015   Comments Off on Cover Cropping for Pollinators and Beneficial Insects

Infographic: 10 Interesting Honey Bee Facts You Never Knew

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By Reagan Musyoka
Boggling Facts
Nov 11, 2015

Excerpt:

Bees must visit 2 million flowers to make 1 lb. of honey, meaning one hive of bees will fly over 55,000 miles to produce it. On average one hive can produce up to 100 lbs of honey each year.

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November 12, 2015   Comments Off on Infographic: 10 Interesting Honey Bee Facts You Never Knew

Cornell researcher proves pollination can be honeybee free

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Research and fieldwork is proving wild bees can play a critical role in saving growers money, easing pressure on vulnerable honeybee hives, increasing sustainability and, most importantly, enhancing food security

By John Carberry
Cornell Chronicle
Oct 30, 2015

Excerpt:

That idea took flight during a walk through the Ithaca orchards in May 2014. Danforth and farm manager Eric Shatt were checking bee activity when, in addition to the honeybees from six rented hives, they noticed countless wild bees elbowing in for a meal – from mud-building mason bees and honeybee lookalike Colletes inaequalis to solitary carpenter bees and social halictids. They also spotted many species of Andrena, a mild-mannered ground nesting bee that “scrabbles” deep into flowers, a technique former Danforth Lab researcher Mia Park, M.S. ’06, Ph.D. ’14, demonstrated is four times more effective at pollinating than “side working” honeybees.

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November 4, 2015   Comments Off on Cornell researcher proves pollination can be honeybee free

Michigan State University’s Pollinator Initiative Project

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Rebecca Masterman, associate director of the University of Minnesota’s Bee Squad, with a “bee beard.” Image: Bee Squad.

“Pests and the diseases they are spreading are a big challenge,” Masterman said. Bee parasites like varroa mites are a global problem.

By Kelly Vanfrankenhuyzen
Great Lakes Echo
Oct 25, 2015

Excerpt:

“One colony of bees cost $550 and $100 for equipment,” she said. The Bee Squad offers classes and a mentoring program. The classes are offered once a year for eight hours, but the limit is six people.

“It’s a manageable way to train people in basic beekeeping,” Masterman said.

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October 31, 2015   Comments Off on Michigan State University’s Pollinator Initiative Project

Enhancing gardens as habitats for flower-visiting aerial insects (pollinators): should we plant native or exotic species?

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This experiment has shown that flowering garden plant assemblages can provide a resource for pollinators regardless of the plants’ origin and that the greater the resource available the more pollinators will visit.

By Andrew Salisbury, James Armitage1, Helen Bostock1, Joe Perry, Mark Tatchell and Ken Thompson
Journal of Applied Ecology
Aug 11, 2015

Excerpt:

Summary:

1. Domestic gardens typically consist of a mixture of native and non-native plants which support biodiversity and provide valuable ecosystem services, particularly in urban environments. Many gardeners wish to encourage biodiversity by choosing appropriate plant taxa. The value of native and non-native plants in supporting animal biodiversity is, however, largely unknown.

2. The relative value of native and non-native garden plants to invertebrates was investigated in a replicated field experiment. Plots (deliberately akin to garden borders) were planted with one of three treatments, representing assemblages of plants based on origin (native, near-native and exotic). Invertebrates and resource measurements were recorded over four years. This paper reports the abundance of flower-visiting aerial insects (‘pollinators’) associated with the three plant assemblages.

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August 18, 2015   Comments Off on Enhancing gardens as habitats for flower-visiting aerial insects (pollinators): should we plant native or exotic species?

Visit with a seasoned beekeeper in Victoria, BC

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Entering the Secret Life of the Honey Bee

By Larraine Roulston
Green Mom
August 11, 2015

Excerpt:

This summer I had a great opportunity to shadow my brother-in-law Bob while he tended his backyard bee hives. As a Examining a honeycomb mainseasoned beekeeper and member of the Capital Region Beekeepers’ Association in Victoria, BC, Bob has 11 hives, each containing rows of hanging combs, all buzzing with activity. Donning the bulky white suit, mask, hat, gloves and boots, I was then ready to view their amazing contribution to our ability to grow food.

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August 12, 2015   Comments Off on Visit with a seasoned beekeeper in Victoria, BC

Government Ministers highlight agriculture at urban farm in Edmonton, Alberta

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Minister of Tourism and Culture David Eggen was very pleased with the idea. “It’s reassuring to know that people are taking the time to use urban landscapes to grow food.”

By Kirby Bourne
iNews880
July 12, 2015

Excerpt:

When you think of Northlands you likely think of horse racing, Oilers games, maybe K-Days, but there is another word that should spring to mind, farm.

Last June vacant space on the campus was refurbished into a commercial urban farm. Since then Director of Agriculture Heather Shewchuck says they’ve been focusing on promoting local and sustainable food.

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July 22, 2015   Comments Off on Government Ministers highlight agriculture at urban farm in Edmonton, Alberta

Oslo creates world’s first ‘highway’ to protect endangered bees

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Norway’s capital is creating a route filled with flowers and ‘green roofs’ to protect endangered pollinators essential to food production

Agence France-Presse
via The Guardian
25 June 2015

Excerpt:

From flower-emblazoned cemeteries to rooftop gardens and balconies, Norway’s capital Oslo is creating a “bee highway” to protect endangered pollinators essential to food production.

“We are constantly reshaping our environment to meet our needs, forgetting that other species also live in it,” Agnes Lyche Melvaer, head of the Bybi, an environmental group supporting urban bees, which is leading the project.

“To correct that we need to return places to them to live and feed,” she explained, sitting on a bench in a lush city centre square bursting with early Nordic summer growth.

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June 27, 2015   Comments Off on Oslo creates world’s first ‘highway’ to protect endangered bees

Urban Bee Farming Becoming Popular in Seoul

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beekorUrban bee farming is a mark of an improved city environment, as bees can only survive in habitats abundant with trees and flowers. (image: Urban Bees Seoul)

Researchers can also learn more about a city’s air quality by examining the number of bees in the city.

Korea Bizwire
June 17, 2015

Excerpt:

Seoul is housing more beehives as citizens are increasingly interested in the unique experience of bee farming.

A citizen school for bee farming has seen its second term students this year, and apiaries can now be found on the roofs of Seoul’s UNESCO building, a building around Yangjae Station, a Seoul University building and a building on Nodeul Island.

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June 25, 2015   Comments Off on Urban Bee Farming Becoming Popular in Seoul

That’s billion, with a bee: Measuring the massive cost of hive collapse

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Click on image for larger file.

Right now, the honey bee adds more than $15 billion to the U.S. economy alone

By Amy Tennery
Reuters
May 19, 2015

Excerpt:

The makers of insecticides containing neonics, Bayer and Syngenta chief among them, have a lot to lose if regulatory bodies end up siding with the environmentalists. More than 90 percent of the corn in the U.S. is treated with neonics, according to this release from Bayer. To put this in perspective, last year the USDA estimated that around 91.6 million acres of corn were planted in the United States. That’s a lot of neonic’d corn.

So what happens if — or when — we run out of honey bees?

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May 29, 2015   Comments Off on That’s billion, with a bee: Measuring the massive cost of hive collapse

Iowa urban beekeepers key to growing pollinators populations

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Honey bees bumble around their nest after Des Moines beekeeper Julia McGuire pulls it out of one of the many urban bee hives which she manages on Thursday, May 14, 2015. (Photo: Bryon Houlgrave/The Register)

Iowa beekeepers lost 61 percent of their colonies in 2014-15, among hardest hit in USA

By Donnelle Eller
The Des Moines Register
May 16, 2015

Excerpt:

It’s backyard beekeepers such as Lens and Julia McGuire, with two, three or four hives, who are boosting the state’s overall pollinator population, and helping to offset devastating annual losses.

A national report last week showed Iowa bee colonies were among the hardest hit in the nation. Iowa beekeepers lost 61 percent of their colonies in 2014-15.

It was the fourth-highest loss in the nation — behind Oklahoma, Illinois, Pennsylvania and Maine, the U.S. Department of Agriculture reported.

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May 23, 2015   Comments Off on Iowa urban beekeepers key to growing pollinators populations

Urban beekeeping gets nod from Edmonton council

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‘Honeybees are interested in nectar, pollen and that’s about it’

CBC News
Apr 28, 2015

Excerpt:

“The city, in the end, was very receptive to it,” Hamilton said. “They were ready for that conversation. Urban agriculture is a hot topic right now.”

The city, in fact, was running a project test piloting urban beekeeping and Hamilton and Crocker signed on.

Today the gave the go ahead to prospective beekeepers around the city.

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May 8, 2015   Comments Off on Urban beekeeping gets nod from Edmonton council

Millions of honey bees in truck crash in Washington

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Each box contains about 5,000 bees.

Kiro TV
Apr 17, 2015

Excerpt:

KIRO 7 News video showed dozens of boxes of live bees scattered across the road. Beekeepers from the company who owns the bees, Belleville Honey in Burlingon, are at the scene, using smoke to calm the bees and get them back into boxes and loaded onto trucks.

Numerous boxes of bees were crushed in the crash. Each box contains about 5,000 bees.

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April 17, 2015   Comments Off on Millions of honey bees in truck crash in Washington