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Category — Book

Urban Agriculture Europe – the book

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Case studies from Barcelona, Dublin, Geneva, Milan, Sofia, Warsaw, and the Ruhr metropolis

By Frank Lohrberg, Lilli Li?ka, Lionella Scazzosi, Axel Timpe (eds.)
Available in bookstores or directly at Jovis publishers in December 2015. The book will be available in the United States and Canada through artbooks / D.A.P in March 2016

How can agriculture contribute to the sustainable development of European cities? How can agriculture and horticulture create vital urban spaces that have new social and ecological qualities and are also economically viable?

Urban Agriculture Europe is the first comprehensive, transdisciplinary publication about Urban Agriculture in Europe. Apart from well-known examples of urban food gardens in western European metropolises, this volume also studies innovative forms of agriculture on the urban periphery, bringing in experiences in eastern and southern Europe.

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May 2, 2016   No Comments

Garden book from Manitoulin Island, Northern Ontario

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82-year-old Ed Burt shares his secrets

By Michael Erskine
The Manitoulin Express
April 15, 2016

Excerpt:

he first learned the art and science of gardening at the foot of his grandfather 82 years ago at the age of five— and a lot of the knowledge he has acquired over the years is contained in his new book, ‘My Journey in the Garden: Ed Burt’s Way of Growing Food’.

“When my grandparents came to Manitoulin they experienced some especially rough winters,” he said. “We didn’t have the transportation we have now. The railroad was 40-50 miles away and if you didn’t have a horse, it was a long way away.” Adding to the distance, the roads in those days were not ploughed in the winter and few people had a car or truck to travel the roads even if the snow wasn’t an obstacle. Growing and storing food wasn’t a hobby or pastime in those early days, it was a survival skill. “I grew up in that environment,” said Mr. Burt.

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April 30, 2016   No Comments

An Urban Grower’s Guide: Selling the Food You Grow in Pittsburgh

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The goal of the guide is to encourage city residents to grow and sell produce by providing resources that explain the relevant rules and regulations.

By Grow Pittsburgh, Penn State Extension, and Pittsburgh Food Policy Council
April 2016

Excerpt:

Writing a Business Plan

Writing a business plan can be a long process, but these resources will help you out:

Penn State Extension provides many resources from an agriculture perspective. Visit the Creating a Business Plan page, or Start Farming, which is a comprehensive resource hub that covers the entire scope of production, business and state/federal regulations for those new to growing for profit.

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April 26, 2016   No Comments

From Cows to Concrete: The Rise and Fall of Farming in Los Angeles

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Forthcoming May 14, 2016

By Rachel Surls and Judith Gerber
Angel City Press
May 2016
(Must see. Mike)

Excerpt:

Q: What inspired you and [co-author] Judi Gerber to write this book?

It was different for both of us. During the time I was the UC Cooperative Extension County Director – this was about 15-20 years ago – I came across some statistics for farming in Los Angeles County that really surprised me. Once – relatively recently – Los Angeles County was a huge agricultural producer, but no one seemed to know this. It was once the largest, most bountiful agricultural county in the U.S. (for four decades, between 1909-1949). It’s now primarily urban and is the most populated county in the nation. So there was this extreme turnabout in only 40-50 years. I was intrigued.

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April 5, 2016   Comments Off on From Cows to Concrete: The Rise and Fall of Farming in Los Angeles

The Joy of Foraging

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Gary Lincoff’s Illustrated Guide to Finding, Harvesting, and Enjoying a World of Wild Food

By Gary Lincoff
Quarry Books
2012

Discover the edible riches in your backyard, local parks, woods, and even roadside! In The Joy of Foraging, Gary Lincoff shows you how to find fiddlehead ferns, rose hips, beach plums, bee balm, and more, whether you are foraging in the urban jungle or the wild, wild woods. You will also learn about fellow foragers—experts, folk healers, hobbyists, or novices like you—who collect wild things and are learning new things to do with them every day.

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April 3, 2016   Comments Off on The Joy of Foraging

One Hen

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A year later, Kojo has built up a flock of 25 hens. With his earnings Kojo is able to return to school. Soon Kojo’s farm grows to become the largest in the region.

Written by Katie Smith Milway
Illustrated by Eugenie Fernandes
Kid Can Press
2008

Inspired by true events, One Hen tells the story of Kojo, a boy from Ghana who turns a small loan into a thriving farm and a livelihood for many.

After his father died, Kojo had to quit school to help his mother collect firewood to sell at the market. When his mother receives a loan from some village families, she gives a little money to her son. With this tiny loan, Kojo buys a hen.

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April 1, 2016   Comments Off on One Hen

Mycelial Mayhem

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Growing Mushrooms for Fun, Profit and Companion Planting

By David Sewak & Kristin Sewak
New Society Books
March 2016

Most supermarket mushrooms are bland and boring; products of an industrial process which typically relies on expensive equipment and harmful pesticides. Many people would like to add more flavorful and diverse fungi to their diets, but lack the knowledge or confidence to gather their own. Do-it-yourself cultivation is a fun, exciting way to incorporate a variety of mushrooms into a sustainable lifestyle.

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March 28, 2016   Comments Off on Mycelial Mayhem

Pacific Northwest Foraging

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120 wild and flavorful edibles from Alaska blueberries to wild hazelnuts

By Douglas Deur
Timber Press
2014

The Pacific Northwest offers a veritable feast for foragers. The forests, meadows, streambanks, and even the weedy margins of neighborhoods are home to an abundance of delicious wild edible plants. Discover wild lilies with their peppery flowers, buds, and seeds and use them in your spring salads. Select sweet, succulent thistles or the shoots of invasive Himalayan blackberries and Japanese knotweed to add wonderful flavor to hearty soups.

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March 28, 2016   Comments Off on Pacific Northwest Foraging

My First Book About How Things Grow

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With over 120 stickers of flowers, vegetables, seeds and trees to add to the pages, a glossary, quiz, and naming and spotting games.

Author/Editor: Felicity Brooks
Illustrator: Rosalinde Bonnet
Usborne Publishing Ltd
24 pages + 4 pages stickers

An accessible, informative first reference book that helps young children learn about trees, plants and funghi – what each of these things is, how to tell them apart, what each needs to survive and thrive, and their life cycles, including information about how they reproduce.

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March 27, 2016   Comments Off on My First Book About How Things Grow

Vancouver Tree Book: A Living City Field Guide

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More than 110 of Vancouver’s important species are profiled.

By David Tracey
Pure Wave Media
(March 15, 2016)
240 pages

Trees tell the story of a city, and Vancouver has one of the world’s greatest urban forests. Vancouver Tree Book is the key to a living laboratory unlike anywhere else on Earth.

Slim enough to fit into a pocket yet filled with detailed descriptions and hundreds of colour images, this Living City Field Guide is designed for outdoor use. Bring it with you anywhere you go to discover the quiet giants living among us. Maps to ten Tree Tour walks will help you get going.

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March 26, 2016   Comments Off on Vancouver Tree Book: A Living City Field Guide

Victory Gardens for Bees: A DIY Guide to Saving the Bees

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Forthcoming April 30, 2016

By Lori Weidenhammer
Douglas & McIntyre
April 30, 2016
240 pages

Who knew modern civilization may be brought down, not by plagues or war, but by bees? Or, more correctly, by no bees? This book investigates the growing problem of bee mortality and offers practical measures we can all take to help. In ecological terms, bees play a critical role in the survival of many plant communities and the continuation of life on this planet. No pollination, no seeds. No seeds, no future.

Now that bees are facing unprecedented levels of die-off caused by a toxic mixture of environmental stresses, a community-based effort is needed to make gardens, fields and landscapes healthy sanctuaries for bees. Just as citizens banded together to produce Victory Gardens to offset the perilous food shortages of World Wars I and II, now a similarly vital level of collective effort is needed to make our gardens into lifesaving shelters for these essential creatures.

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March 21, 2016   Comments Off on Victory Gardens for Bees: A DIY Guide to Saving the Bees

Resilient Gardens 2016: Climate Change, Stress Disorders, Pest Update

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The Best of West Coast Gardening

By Linda A. Gilkeson
Salt Spring Island
2016

Here is what gardeners on the coast of British Columbia and Washington need to know to adapt their gardening methods to drier, warmer summers, water shortages and extreme weather patterns. Chapters also cover the changing climate, effects of environmental stress on plants, including stress disorders of tomatoes, apples and other crops. The second part of the publication updates information on key pests and diseases of ornamentals and food gardens, including spotted wing Drosophila, European chafer, clubroot, powdery mildew and rabbits.

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March 18, 2016   Comments Off on Resilient Gardens 2016: Climate Change, Stress Disorders, Pest Update

If You Plant a Seed

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“If you plant a carrot seed, a carrot will grow. If you plant a cabbage seed, a cabbage will grow.”

By Kadir Nelson
Balzer + Bray
March 3 2015

Kadir Nelson, acclaimed author of Baby Bear and winner of the Caldecott Honor and the Coretta Scott King Author and Illustrator Awards, presents a resonant, gently humorous story about the power of even the smallest acts and the rewards of compassion and generosity.

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March 9, 2016   Comments Off on If You Plant a Seed

Canada: A National Strategy For Urban Agriculture

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Canada’s Minister of Agriculture comments on City Farmer’s plan “I will certainly consider the recommendations you have outlined in the enclosed publication as I pursue my mandate.” Laurence MacAulay

By Michael Levenston
City Farmer Executive Director
March 3, 2016
15 page booklet (10MB file)

Thirty-six years ago in 1980, City Farmer sent copies of its newspaper to Canada’s Members of Parliament to introduce them to the subject of urban agriculture. In January, 2016, we sent Federal Cabinet Ministers a 15 page booklet outlining a proposal which asks the new Government to consider setting up a National Office of Urban Agriculture.

“It’s a new year and time to put in place a program that will benefit all Canadians. We hope you will consider Canada: A National Strategy for Urban Agriculture as a worthy project for your new government. I’m certain it will be well received by Canadians who want to eat better, care for our environment, and improve our general well being.”

Canada’s Minister of Agriculture, Laurence MacAulay, wrote back expressing his appreciation for our work and commented positively about our plan “I will certainly consider the recommendations you have outlined in the enclosed publication as I pursue my mandate.”

Excerpt from the City Farmer booklet:

Over 26 million Canadians live in 147 metropolitan areas and agglomerations across the country with populations that range from 5,600,000 people in Toronto to 10,500 in Bay Roberts, Newfoundland.

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March 3, 2016   Comments Off on Canada: A National Strategy For Urban Agriculture

My Dog’s a Chicken

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The girl decides that one of the many chickens roaming their yard could make a suitable dog—especially the black-and-white speckled hen who struts around like she owns the place.

By Susan McElroy Montanari and Anne Wilsdorf
Schwartz & Wade
Feb 2016

Lula Mae wants a puppy, but times are hard and she’ll just have to make do. Her family has plenty of chickens, so she decides maybe a chicken can be a dog.

Pookie, as Lula Mae names her, is an ordinary chicken, but Lula Mae thinks she is very doglike indeed.

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March 3, 2016   Comments Off on My Dog’s a Chicken