New Stories From 'Urban Agriculture Notes'
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Category — Book

Deeply Rooted: Medicinal Plant Cultivation in Techtropolis

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The book is a starter guide for growing and using local plants as medicine.

By Author, Bonnie Rose Weaver, and editor, Mari Amend
Kickstarter
Aug 2016

Deeply Rooted includes:

Over 40 original drawings and graphics by Bonnie Rose Weaver

Foreword by San Francisco urban farmer Caitlyn Galloway of Little City Gardens

Essay by Lauren Kaneko-Jones, LAc of SWAP and Well in the West about living in harmony with the seasons -Specific herbal cultivation techniques

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August 23, 2016   No Comments

Sowing Seeds in the City: Ecosystem and Municipal Services

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New Book: From White House to Tacoma, WA, urban agriculture is growing

By Sally Brown (Editor), Kristen McIvor (Editor), Elizabeth Hodges Snyder (Editor)
Hardcover: 407 pages
Publisher: Springer; 1st ed. 2016 edition (April 26, 2016)
(Must see. Mike)

Summary:

Urban agriculture has the potential to change our food systems, enhance habitat in our cities, and to morph urban areas into regions that maximize rather than disrupt ecosystem services. The potential impacts of urban agriculture on a range of ecosystem services including soil and water conservation, waste recycling, climate change mitigation, habitat, and food production is only beginning to be recognized.

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August 19, 2016   No Comments

Excerpts from Michael Ableman’s book, ‘Street Farm’ (August 2016)

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A Sole Food urban farm in an old Petro-Canada station in Vancouver’s East End. Photo by Agriculture Urbana.

‘People are no easier to recover than the land buried under layers of pavement.’

By Michael Ableman
Earth Island Journal
Aug 17, 2016

Excerpt:

We interrupt harvesting for one of our farm walks, a chance for me to share some techniques or a little philosophy, answer questions, and tell stories. And I realize that even as I am telling stories to make abundance real and visual for folks who may never have experienced it, I am feeling my own doubts and questions about what lies ahead. It feels odd for me standing in this parking lot on a street corner talking about soil microbes, optimal plant spacing, or the life cycle of an aphid. On my rural farm, not far from here, I’d be carrying on similar conversations, but there I’m mentoring young, well-scrubbed kids fresh out of college, most of whom have never known real hardship, all still hopeful and idealistic, too young for life to have slapped them around.

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August 18, 2016   No Comments

Beyond the Kale: Urban Agriculture and Social Justice Activism in New York City

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New book released today! “We hope that the book will contribute to the strong and growing movement for a more socially just food system in New York City and far beyond.” (The authors.)

By Kristin Reynolds and Nevin Cohen
2016, University of Georgia Press Geographies of Justice & Social Transformation series.

Urban agriculture is increasingly considered an important part of creating just and sustainable cities. Yet the benefits that many people attribute to urban agriculture—fresh food, green space, educational opportunities—can mask structural inequities, thereby making political transformation harder to achieve. Realizing social and environmental justice requires moving beyond food production to address deeper issues such as structural racism, gender inequity, and economic disparities. Beyond the Kale argues that urban agricultural projects focused explicitly on dismantling oppressive systems have the greatest potential to achieve substantive social change.

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August 15, 2016   No Comments

Gardens and health: Implications for policy and practice

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We recommend that the key influencers in the health, environmental, and gardening and horticulture sectors need to come together and develop a stronger joint strategy that will allow them to have a greater influence on policy on gardens and health at the strategic as well as local level, and contribute constructively to debates on sustainability

By David Buck
The King’s Fund is an independent charity working to improve health and care in England.
This report was commissioned by the National Gardens Scheme
May 2016

Excerpt:

Executive summary: What this report is about

This report looks at the impact of gardens and gardening on health and wellbeing, and explores what the NHS and the wider health and social care system can do to maximise this impact.
Gardens are often thought of as intimate private spaces attached to private households but they can also be large private or formal gardens open to the public, or part of hospitals, care homes or hospices. Gardens serve many purposes: they can be cultivated for flowers or growing food; used as spaces for exercise, relaxation, solace and recovery; used as places to play, meet and volunteer; and can be part of wider environmental, planning or sustainability policies.

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August 3, 2016   Comments Off on Gardens and health: Implications for policy and practice

Street Farm: Growing Food, Jobs, and Hope on the Urban Frontier

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Forthcoming in September, 2016 – By Michael Ableman

By Michael Ableman
Chelsea Green Publishing
Aug/Sept 2016

Street Farm is the inspirational account of residents in the notorious Low Track in Vancouver, British Columbia—one of the worst urban slums in North America—who joined together to create an urban farm as a means of addressing the chronic problems in their neighborhood. It is a story of recovery, of land and food, of people, and of the power of farming and nourishing others as a way to heal our world and ourselves.

During the past seven years, Sole Food Street Farms—now North America’s largest urban farm project—has transformed acres of vacant and contaminated urban land into street farms that grow artisan-quality fruits and vegetables. By providing jobs, agricultural training, and inclusion in a community of farmers and food lovers, the Sole Food project has empowered dozens of individuals with limited resources who are managing addiction and chronic mental health problems.

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July 29, 2016   Comments Off on Street Farm: Growing Food, Jobs, and Hope on the Urban Frontier

Drip Irrigation, Mulching and Ramial Chipped Wood

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Mulching with plastic material.

Book titled “Waterless Farming’ looks at these techniques

Waterless Farming
By Francis Freeman
Youcanprint Self-Publishing
(May 23, 2016)

Excerpt:

But what is Ramial Chipped Wood (RCW)? In a nutshell, RCW can be defined a biological agricultural technique directed to enrich and manure the soil, as well as succeed in growing plants without water. To achieve these goals the strategy used is to spread and then mix chopped fresh twigs (from now on also called wood chips or chipped wood) in the soil; this gives rise to a whole series of events, which generate a trophic chain, which in the last analysis consents to obtain such extraordinary results.

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July 5, 2016   Comments Off on Drip Irrigation, Mulching and Ramial Chipped Wood

Climate change causes City Farmer to try different gardening techniques in Vancouver plot

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MikeSharonCity Farmer’s Michael Levenston and Sharon Slack, along with other staff, have created a climate-change adaptation garden. Photo by Carlito Pablo.

Inside City Farmer’s office is a copy of Resilient Gardens 2016: Climate Change, Stress Disorders, Pest Update. Levenston and Slack recommended this new book by Salt Spring Island–based pest-management and gardening expert Linda Gilkeson.

By Carlito Pablo
Georgia Straight
June 8th, 2016

Excerpt:

Last summer was so hot that many probably thought it was one for the books. Well, it turned out that Earth in 2015 had its warmest summer in recorded history. It was another sign that the planet is heating up, due mainly to human-induced greenhouse-gas emissions into the atmosphere.

For some folks in Vancouver, the dry conditions at the time made gardening so challenging that they immediately started an experiment.

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June 9, 2016   Comments Off on Climate change causes City Farmer to try different gardening techniques in Vancouver plot

Growing Food For Growing Cities

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Transforming Food Systems In An Urbanizing World

By Douglas Bereuter and Dan Glickman, cochairs Thomas A. Reardon, principal author Endorsed by an Independent Advisory Group
The Chicago Council of Global Affairs
April 2016
124 pages

Excerpt:

Growth in the world’s cities is exploding. Today, more people live in urban areas than in rural areas. By 2050, 66 percent of the world’s people are expected to live
1n cities, feuling unprecedented demand for food. Especially low – and middle – income countries(LMICs) in Asia, Africa, and Latin America, feeding urban populations has become an urgent and critical challenge.

As cities grow, diets are changing. Urban consumers are demanding a more diversified diet, including fruits, vegetables, dairy, and meat, and are increasingly consuming processed foods. Accompanying these shifts is the transformation of supply chains, affecting farmers, small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), and consumers. A process has begun, which will continue for decades, that is transforming food systems from farm to fork.

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June 8, 2016   Comments Off on Growing Food For Growing Cities

Expedition agroparks

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Research by design into sustainable development and agriculture in the network society

By Peter J.A.M. Smeets
Wageningen Academic Pubishers
2011 Pages: 320

This book is the result of several years of expedition into the development of metropolitan FoodClusters. The author’s fascination for the agricultural landscapes in and around metropolises led him to the conclusion that improving the efficiency of agriculture is the most effective way to safeguard the quality of such landscapes. The wasteful modes of production developed in the past 150 years have led to a serious decline in both the surface area and the quality of the highly valued landscapes.

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May 24, 2016   Comments Off on Expedition agroparks

Urban Gardening in Berlin

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Touren zu den neuen Gärten der Stadt Unterwegs in Berlin

By Elisabeth Meyer-Renschhausen
192 Seiten, 184 Abb., 135 x 210 mm, Paperback
Februar 2016

Mitten in der Stadt wohnen und trotzdem das eigene Gemüse anpflanzen, pflegen und ernten: Großer Luxus, der manchmal sogar in einer kleinen Kiste wächst. Die Idee des Urban Gardening kam bereits Anfang des 20. Jahrhunderts auf und wird in Berlin seit einigen Jahren wieder kultiviert. Dieses Buch führt den Leser zu über 70 sehenswerten Berliner Gartenprojekten, stellt unterschiedliche Konzepte des Urban Gardening vor und verrät, wo sich ganz besondere Gärten verbergen.

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May 18, 2016   Comments Off on Urban Gardening in Berlin

Community Garden Club of Meredith, New Hampshire hosts ‘Gardening is Murder’ author Neal Sanders

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He chronicles their garden and his views on gardening in his widely read blog, ‘The Principal Undergardener’.

The Citizen
May 9, 2016

Excerpt:

Neal Sanders retired from the corporate world in 2005 with an idea that he might pursue writing fiction. With the upcoming publication of ‘How to Murder Your Contractor’, he has now written ten books, and has many more ideas for future intrigue. Many of his mysteries feature a horticultural theme and more than a few of them will garner a chuckle as the plot unfolds.

Strong, independent women are at the heart of his writing. Sometimes they solve crimes, sometimes they commit them, but the women are always interesting and his books contain unexpected twists guaranteed to intrigue all readers. Neal’s books stand out as he is a thorough researcher adding accurate descriptions and details whether it is a flower show, corporate merger, or murder trial.

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May 16, 2016   Comments Off on Community Garden Club of Meredith, New Hampshire hosts ‘Gardening is Murder’ author Neal Sanders

Food And The Cities

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Food policies for sustainable cities

By Andrea Calori and Andrea Magarini
Edizioni Ambiente
October 2015
Pages 200

Food systems sustainability is strongly influenced by world urbanization: since 2008, more than half of the world’s population lives in a city, which is an ecosystem that depends on other resources to acquire what is needed (energy, water, soil, food, etc.) and to dispose of what is not metabolized (waste, scrap, emissions, etc.). Besides, world urbanization also shapes the imbalances between global wealth production as measured in GDP and the many facets of well-being, sustainability, and the resilience of social and environmental systems against external shocks.

The first part of the book examines the fundamental elements of agro-food cycles, that represent crucial factors of the urban metabolism and its social, economic, and environmental dimensions; these elements constitute the “urban infrastructure,” along with social services, public transportation, health care, education, waste and water management. They are a fundamental component of in the urban life that is inseparable from citizens’ basic rights and needs, individual lifestyles and cultures, the socio-economic structure, and the city’s relationship with the surrounding environment.

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May 15, 2016   Comments Off on Food And The Cities

RUAF renewed its Global Partnership on Sustainable Urban Agriculture and Food Systems

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RUAF Update – May 2016

Excerpt:

In a recent meeting (18-21 April 2016) in its new home base in Amersfoort, the Netherlands, RUAF Foundation, with several of its founding partners and a number of new partner institutions have renewed the RUAF Global Partnership on Sustainable Urban Agriculture and Food Systems.

This new partnership replaces the RUAF member network that existed since the start of RUAF in 2000. The current members of the RUAF Partnership are a mix of municipalities, research institutes, and NGOs and include: the International Water Management Institute based in Colombo, Sri Lanka; the Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research of the Chinese Academy of Sciences based in Beijing, China;

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May 13, 2016   Comments Off on RUAF renewed its Global Partnership on Sustainable Urban Agriculture and Food Systems

A Review Of The Benefits And Limitations Of Urban Agriculture

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Vacant Lots To Vibrant Plot

By Raychel Santo Anne Palmer Brent Kim
John Hopkins Centre for Liveable Future
May 2016
(Must see. Mike)

Excerpt:

Recommendations for framing the merits of urban agriculture.

Urban agriculture should be evaluated for the multifaceted nature of its outcomes – social, health, environmental, and economic – and not merely for its potential outputs in terms of food production or economic development measures.

The list below offers a number of evidence-based talking points for advocates seeking to advance urban agriculture policy and programs:

1) Urban agriculture’s most significant benefits center around its ability to increase social capital, community well-being, and civic engagement with the food system.

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May 9, 2016   Comments Off on A Review Of The Benefits And Limitations Of Urban Agriculture