New Stories From 'Urban Agriculture Notes'
Random header image... Refresh for more!

Category — Canada

Urbanfarmerz ECommerce for Backyard Farmers

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

ecom

URBANFARMERZ is a Canadian social enterprise with global ambitions whose mission is to empower backyard farmers and urban growers around the world to GROW – FEED – SHARE of their bounty through our mobile eCommerce marketplace.

Indiegogo
Dec 2, 2016

Excerpt:

While municipalities have begun to actively promote urban agriculture, millions of current & aspiring backyard farmers have limited access to tools to help commercialize local market opportunities.

Our solution to these problems is The URBANFARMERZ eCommerce Marketplace, an Urban-Agro Community platform bringing buyers & sellers together for the fair, direct exchange of fresh local produce while disrupting traditional supply chain models.

The platform consists of (2) key components;

[Read more →]

December 8, 2016   No Comments

‘Munch’ project enlivens city street life in Coquitlam, BC

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

coq
Erin Davidson of the Austin Heights Business Improvement Association and Peter Meegan of Mary Ann Meegan Insurance Ltd. with one of 38 planters filled with edible produce and herbs that was installed earlier this year for Coquitlam Munch, a city of Coquitlam Community in Bloom project.

38 self-watering planters, created by a garden designer Rachel Elves, are planted with food by the adopting businesses.

By Diane Strandberg
Tri City News
June 23, 2016

Excerpt:

“I thought it was a good community thing,” said Meegan, who had to plant the herbs and veggies as part of the planter “adoption” process, and was surprised at how fun it was.

“It’s in the blood,” he joked, noting that members of his Irish family are good gardeners.

[Read more →]

November 30, 2016   No Comments

Green acres are flourishing on campus rooftops across Canada

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

macroof
Elevator pitch: Arlene Throness of Ryerson’s farm, originally proposed by architect students (Mark Blinch/Ryerson University) Click on image for larger file.

Sustainability-minded green roof projects are appearing from Montreal’s Concordia to the University of Saskatchewan

By Leanne Delap
Macleans
November 28, 2016

Excerpt:

And at the University of Saskatchewan, an opportunity arose on top of the phytotron (a research greenhouse). The condensers were moved, leaving a bare expanse visible from an open walkway.

“Aha,” said Grant Wood, a professor of urban agriculture, who worked with the university’s office of sustainability to come up with “the rooftop.” After getting the engineering students to check on load-bearing weights, and “a lot of paperwork,” says Wood, pallets and recycled containers were moved onto the roof. The team started with 500 sq. feet of planting, for a yield of about a thousand pounds of produce this past year; the goal is to double that next year.

[Read more →]

November 29, 2016   No Comments

Speedibin: Metal Compost Bin That Keeps Rodents Out

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

speed Joyce McMenamon, second generation developer of the Speedibin.

Indiegogo Campaign – Speedibins were first designed by Fred and Peg Francis in 1989

By Joyce McMenamon
Courtenay BC, Canada
Nov. 2016

It is all metal so animals can’t chew through.

A metal mesh screen on the bottom allows worms, microbes and water to transfer but prevents animals from tunneling in.

The large lid comes right off for easy access.

The front door slides out for easy removal of finished compost.

A latching handle keeps out raccoons, dogs and wind.

[Read more →]

November 26, 2016   No Comments

London, Ontario: Upcoming urban agriculture policy

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

wood
Gabor Sass at Wood Street Food Forest. Photo by Chris Mountanin.

London is embarking on its first urban agriculture strategy and an upcoming conference at the Central Library November 19 is offering residents an opportunity to contribute.

By Chris Montanini
Londoner
November 14, 2016

Excerpt:

City staff responded with draft terms of reference for an urban agriculture strategy in September that so far includes:

• Establishing a vision and goals for the City regarding food growth, food processing and food distribution within the urban area of the city;

• Determining the roles for the community and the City, both regulatory and operational support, in the implementation of the strategy;

• Evaluating the Official Plan, zoning and other municipal bylaws and programs with respect to their role in urban agriculture for the City;

[Read more →]

November 22, 2016   Comments Off on London, Ontario: Upcoming urban agriculture policy

Ottawa’s National Capital Commission (NCC) renting out plots to urban farmers

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

ncc

The National Capital Commission (NCC) has started renting out properties in Ottawa’s Greenbelt to prospective farmers and is hosting a panel on the emerging importance of sustainable urban agriculture.

By Cassandra Wood
iPolitcs
Nov 13, 2016

Excerpt:

The NCC rents out 30 per cent of Ottawa’s Greenbelt to local farmers, said Talbot. The agency controls about 5,000 acres of farmland, equivalent to 40 per cent of the rural lands in the City of Ottawa, which stretches from just outside the town of Arnprior in the west and close to the town of Rockland in the east.

“Since worldwide population is increasing, more people are moving to cities. Around two-thirds of the population will live in cities by 2050,” said Talbot. “We need to farm in a different and better way to feed people in urban and rural areas.”

[Read more →]

November 20, 2016   Comments Off on Ottawa’s National Capital Commission (NCC) renting out plots to urban farmers

Allotment Gardens Combat Food Costs in Sannich, BC

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

saan
Joanne Thomson holds up leaves of chard harvested from her plot at Capital City Allotment Garden off Kent Road. — Image Credit: Wolf Depner/News Staff

Almost a third of respondents spend anywhere between a quarter and a half of their household income on food, according to a survey by the District of Saanich.

By Wolf Depner
Saanich News
Nov 9, 2016

Excerpt:

Mary Wolfe, who gardens at Capital City Allotment, says food security is a big issue for her, noting that she grows anywhere between 70 and 80 per cent of the vegetables that she consumes annually.

This figure, she says, makes up a “significant” share of her total annual food consumption. “If I don’t grow it, mostly, I don’t eat it.”

[Read more →]

November 15, 2016   Comments Off on Allotment Gardens Combat Food Costs in Sannich, BC

Calgary: Urban farmer Kye Kocher transforms backyards into large-scale gardens

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

kye
Kye Kocher in his inner city farm in Calgary, Alta. Photo by Leah Hennel.

Four years into his farming career, the 31-year-old is the president of YYC Growers (a co-op of urban and rural farmers in the Calgary area), tends to 14 plots in his area and operates a personal farm out of his own inner-city backyard.

By Kerianne Sproule and Leah Hennel,
Calgary Herald
Nov 7, 2016

Excerpt:

As an urban farmer, he partners with homeowners in Calgary’s West Hillhurst neighbourhood, transforming their backyards into large-scale gardens. Kocher plans, preps and tends to their backyard plots and harvests the resulting crops. In return, the homeowners receive a portion of the farm-fresh veggies (Kocher also sells some of the produce to local restaurants and markets), and their backyards are no longer sitting stagnant.

[Read more →]

November 15, 2016   Comments Off on Calgary: Urban farmer Kye Kocher transforms backyards into large-scale gardens

The new face of Canadian agriculture

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

wtwa
Tsawwassen Farm School is a unique educational program that is a collaboration between Kwantlen Polytechnic University and Tsawwassen First Nation and on TFN land. (Jean-Philippe Marquis)

Backyard chickens. One-acre market gardens. Rooftop bees. What used to be part of the rural landscape is creeping into the cement-and-steel terrain of Canada’s urban centres, creating an intersection of food, community and education.

By Nikki Wart
Macleans
Nov 3, 2016

Excerpts:

In the past year at the University of Guelph’s Ontario Agricultural College, 60 per cent of the applicants for the bachelor of science and agriculture program came from urban postal codes.

And few companies are doing it as well as Alvéole, a Montreal-based hive-keeping company founded in 2012.

“We’re basically setting up a hive and saying, ‘This is your hive, and you’re going to see food production and agriculture and environment through these bees,’ ” he says, adding that there are a lot of similarities between urban agriculture and traditional agriculture. For one, urban farmers still have to battle weather and disease.

[Read more →]

November 10, 2016   Comments Off on The new face of Canadian agriculture

1987 Article: Ability Garden at City Farmer, Vancouver

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

backyardfarmer1987621 Click on image for larger file. (L-R) Barbara Raynor, Greg Birdsall, Paula Ford and Michael Levenston stand amid the beginnings of a “demonstration garden” for handicapped people, which will be situated within a garden located at Sixth and Maple. The new garden will feature raised beds and easy access for the handicapped. Jim Harrison Photo.

City Farmer brought together Raynor and Kuchta, acting as consultants, with landscape architect Mary-Jane McKay and carpenter Greg Birdsall to put together a demonstration garden specially designed for the handicapped to work in and learn from.

By Lucill Dahm
Vancouver Courier
Aug 16, 1987

You just can’t hold a determined green thumb down._

Although Barbara Raynor, 52, developed rheumatoid arthritis 15 years ago, eventually leaving her with two artificial knees and a “narrowing lifestyle,” she has been able to create and maintain a backyard “urban garden.”

Aside from the very noteworthy feat of actually accomplishing the carpentry hobby off the ground, Raynor has used the unique perspective of a disabled person to open the door to an activity previously denied to a person without the full use of his or her body.

[Read more →]

November 6, 2016   Comments Off on 1987 Article: Ability Garden at City Farmer, Vancouver

Alberta’s Strathcona County releases ‘Urban Agriculture Strategy’

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

uasr

County administration provided the preliminary Urban Agriculture Strategy (UAS) to council at the Oct. 18 Priorities Committee meeting.

Draft: Presented to Strathcona County Transportation & Agriculture Services
September 7, 2016

Table of Contents:

1.0 URBAN AGRICULTURE IN STRATHCONA COUNTY 1
2.0 DEFINING URBAN AGRICULTURE IN STRATHCONA COUNTY 1
2.1 WHERE DOES THIS APPLY? 1
3.0 COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT 1
3.1 ENGAGEMENT PROCESS 1
3.2 ENGAGEMENT OUTCOMES 2
4.0 TAKING ACTION ON URBAN AGRICULTURE 5
4.1 VISION 5
4.2 GOALS 5
4.3 STRATEGY AREAS AND ACTIONS 5
4.3.1 Strategy Area A: Community Gardens 5

[Read more →]

November 4, 2016   Comments Off on Alberta’s Strathcona County releases ‘Urban Agriculture Strategy’

1978 Article: Be a Farmer in the Centre of the City

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

cfnewspaper1978618
The first issue of City Farmer newspaper was published in August 1978.

City Farmer, the brainchild of the Vancouver Community Conservation Centre, is aimed at promoting urban agriculture as a means of saving energy and money for city dwellers.

By Bill Tieleman
Vancouver Sun
August 2, 1978

The high price of food has city residents trading in their riding lawnmowers for rototillers and turning to backyard farming, according to a new monthly Vancouver newspaper.
City Farmer, the brainchild of the Vancouver Community Conservation Centre, is aimed at promoting urban agriculture as a means of saving energy and money for city dwellers.

It offers advice on how to “get back to the land” found in your own backyard.

Michael Levenston, a centre staff member, say the newspaper will attempt to change concepts of how land can be used by encouraging the development of productive gardens in place of lawns.

“City people think of food as something in supermarkets and restaurants,” he says.

They don’t think of themselves as farmers.

[Read more →]

November 3, 2016   Comments Off on 1978 Article: Be a Farmer in the Centre of the City

You Don’t Know ‘Till You Grow

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

1903veggarden

The importance of becoming rooted in gardening

By Claire Livingstone
4th geography student at University of British Columbia
Nov 2, 2016

It is estimated that one fifth of the greenhouse gases that we’re each responsible for, come from how we consume food(1). According to New York Times writer Michael Pollan(2), growing your own food is one of the best things you can do for the environment, as it reduces a sense of dependency on the ‘cheap energy’ that composes so much of an individual’s carbon footprint. As a fourth year UBC Geography student, I am exposed to the importance of being mindful of one’s environmental impacts on an individual level. In order for big changes to happen, we must start with the little ones, and shift how we interact with the Earth on a daily basis.

[Read more →]

November 3, 2016   Comments Off on You Don’t Know ‘Till You Grow

Calgary Earthship To Grow Food For Calgary’s Less Fortunate

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

earthsh
The Earthship at the Grow Calgary farm in Calgary.

A radically sustainable structure made of recycled tires and cans is set to help Canada’s largest urban agriculture farm produce even more food for Calgarians in need.

By Annalise Klingbeil
Calgary Herald
October 24, 2016

Excerpt:

What is believed to be North America’s first urban earthship — an approximately 500 square foot eco-friendly structure located on Grow Calgary’s 4.5-hectare pocket of land, just west of Canada Olympic Park — is nearing completion.

Even in the dead of winter when Calgary’s temperature dips below 20 degrees Celsius, the earthship greenhouse will allow Grow Calgary to do what the non-profit organization does best: grow food for Calgary’s less fortunate.

[Read more →]

October 31, 2016   Comments Off on Calgary Earthship To Grow Food For Calgary’s Less Fortunate

‘Like finding a treasure’: Community garden grows work opportunities in St. John’s, Newfoundland

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

trans
The Transition Employment team at the Elaine Dobbin Centre shows off its potato harvest. (Krissy Holmes/CBC)

“I find it a bit hard, but it’s good work for me,” says Transitions Employment Program client

By Marilyn Boone
CBC News
Oct 23, 2016

Excerpt:

“Everything you can see — the fencing, the beds, the garden plots — have all been made by my transitions kids who are here to learn about work.”

The community garden has grown to 40 beds, producing berries and vegetables, as well as spuds. Some of the produce is used at the Pantry cafe inside the Elaine Dobbin Centre, and four beds of potatoes go to a food bank at Bridges to Hope.

“Horticultural therapy” is how Marshall described it.

[Read more →]

October 29, 2016   Comments Off on ‘Like finding a treasure’: Community garden grows work opportunities in St. John’s, Newfoundland