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Category — Canada

Canada: Special ale brings cheer to 40 years of urban farming at City Farmer

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Click image to see larger file. Maria Keating, an environmental educator with City Farmer Society, with seven different varieties of hops harvested at the Vancouver Compost Garden. Photo by Jason Payne. Also watch the video online.

A bumper crop of hops is being harvested in preparation for urban agriculture advocate City Farmer’s Vancouver-style microbrew.

By Randy Shore
Vancouver Sun
Sept 25, 2017

Excerpt:

Every harvest and the resulting brew is a unique story.

In 2014, the first hop harvest was used to brew a nut brown Pollinator Ale using honey produced on site in celebration of the Year of the Pollinator.

The following year a wind storm knocked down hundreds of trees across the city, including one that crushed the hop trellis and mashed the potato patch. The delay in harvest meant the hops were used fresh rather than dried in their Windstorm Session Ale.

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September 25, 2017   No Comments

Canada: Bowery Project’s urban farms blooming in Toronto’s vacant lots

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It’s a verdant wonderland at the Vanauley Street YMCA homeless shelter thanks to Toronto’s Bowery Project, a volunteer-based operation that transforms empty spaces into mobile urban farms that grow food for local restaurants. (Photo courtesy of Bowery Project)

“The people we engage on the site. It’s so incredible,” she says. “Our impact is more than the growing of food — it’s really the community engagement.”

By Nina Dragicevic
Toronto Stories
Sept 19, 2017

Excerpt:

“What happens with vacant lots sometimes is that developers get held up at heritage or the design committee with their plans,” says Deena DelZotto, half of the duo behind the Bowery Project, which has transforming these unused spaces into mobile urban farms that grow food for local restaurants.

But to be clear, she’s not complaining: “We thought we’d only have one season and now we’re having three.”

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September 25, 2017   No Comments

Canada: Regina Food Bank launches urban agriculture project

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Grade 7 and 8 students, Jacob Exner (foreground), Ella Chay (middle) and Ferison Alcantara (background), from St. Peter Elementary School check out a garden tower, which will be provided for their school for at least a year. Jennifer Ackerman / Regina Leader-Post

Launched by the Regina Food Bank on Wednesday, the Urban Agriculture Outreach Program is aimed at giving students and educators a better understanding of where our food comes from and how it’s grown and produced.

By Jennifer Ackerman
Regina Leader-Post
Sept 20, 2017

Excerpt:

Launched by the Regina Food Bank on Wednesday, the Urban Agriculture Outreach Program is aimed at giving students and educators a better understanding of where our food comes from, and how it’s grown and produced.

There is “room to grow” when it comes to improving young people’s connection with the food they eat, said Steve Compton, the food bank’s CEO.

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September 24, 2017   No Comments

Canada: Vancouver’s Sole Food Street Farms Takes On Poverty With Urban Agriculture

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Click image to see larger file. “One of the things we love most about urban farming is the chance to bring colour and life to unexpected places.”

It’s one of the largest of its kind in North America.

By Lois Abraham
Canadian Press
09/18/2017

Excerpt:

The crops grow in 10,000 specially designed containers on what were once vacant lots.

The urban farm, one of the largest in North America, has helped deal with the chronic problems in the community.

“You walk down Hastings Street in the middle of the afternoon and see somebody on the sidewalk with a needle in their arm or somebody else kind of pirouetting in the middle of the street high on crack and you make judgements. We all do,” says Ableman.

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September 24, 2017   No Comments

Innovative Classrooms Across Canada Are Feeding Young People’s Hunger For Agricultural Knowledge

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On the first day of school last week, Lacombe Composite High School students toured their greenhouse and edible gardens, harvesting gooseberries, cherries and grapes for a canning project.

They’ve since started a commercial aquaponics system, raising up to 1,000 tilapia at a time, some of which are served at the school cafeteria.

By Julie Van Rosendaal
Globe And Mail
Sept 12, 2017

Excerpt:

On the first day of school last week, students in Steven Schultz’s high-school agriculture class in Lacombe, Alta., toured their greenhouse and edible gardens, harvesting gooseberries, cherries and grapes for a canning project. After school, the beekeeping club conducted a postsummer hive inspection, harvesting 60 kilograms of honey from just one of its three hives.

These tasks are part of Lacombe Composite High School’s EcoVision Club, designed 13 years ago to inspire young leaders to make an environmental difference. Science teacher Schultz has been with the project since the beginning, when a student approached him after class.

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September 21, 2017   No Comments

Canada: Garden theft has some green thumbs seeing red at Saskatoon Community Garden

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If a person is need of food, most gardeners are ready to share, but a recent streak of thefts in two of Saskatoon’s community gardens have left a bad taste in the mouth of some.

By Morgan Modjeski
Saskatoon Starphoenix
Sept 14, 2017

Excerpt:

“I went down there and I called out: ‘If that’s not your garden plot, get out or I’m going to call the police,’” she said, noting the man replied he was entitled to the produce because it’s a community garden. “And I said: ‘That doesn’t mean you just come and help yourself. You have to plant the garden, you have to water it and you have to work at it.”

Scrivener said she thought the issue would end after the confrontation, but she said it was actually the beginning as the thefts continued throughout the season, “night after night.”

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September 20, 2017   No Comments

City of Toronto Celebrates Its First Official ‘Urban Agriculture Day’

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“Wheres urban agriculture helps to achieve City of Toronto priorities such as promoting strong neighbourhoods, mitigating climate change and increasing access to healthy, local produce.

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September 17, 2017   No Comments

Cornelia Hahn Oberlander: The Benefit of Nature in High Density Urban Areas

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We must keep every scrap of nature in and around our cities. Nature holds the key to our aesthetic, intellectual, cognitive and even spiritual satisfaction.
– E.O. Wilson in The Biophilia Hypothesis (1984)

By Cornelia Hahn Oberlander, Project Director
and Deanne Manzer, Project Researcher MLA
and Kaitlyn Gillis, Project Advisor
June 26, 2017
(Must see.) Mike

Excerpt:

Greening Strategies

– Every home within a 5 min walk to a greenspace
– Restore or enhance 25ha of natural areas
– 30ha of additional public park – 20,000 trees planted
– 200 public greening projects
– 100 ha of green roofs and
walls, including 33 ha dedicated to urban agriculture
– 200 ha of skyrise greenway (1/2 the size of Stanley park)
– 400km of park connectors – 0.8ha of parkland / 1,000
residents

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September 15, 2017   No Comments

Canada: Gardens designed with water in mind offer resilient solutions during drought, flood conditions

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Peterborough residents David Marshall and Barbara Moffat are shown next to a rain garden they installed in their backyard after being inspired by a GreenUp Ready For Rain Workshop.

Over the last two years our community has experienced conditions of both drought, and flooding.

By Heather Ray
Peterborough Examiner
September 12, 2017

Excerpt:

A rain garden is ready for rain due to its shallow bowl shaped design, which allows rainwater to temporarily be captured before it is slowly absorbed and filtered into the ground, leaving the garden commonly dry between rain events. A depression in the garden is a key identifying feature of any rain garden.

The GreenUP Ready for Rain Peterborough program is helping residents create eight new rain gardens in the city to help mitigate ongoing isolated flooding events and inspire others to soak up rain on their properties. These rain gardens will be installed during the last week of September, with a number of opportunities for community involvement.

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September 14, 2017   No Comments

Canada: How Vancouver property developers cash in on community gardens

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Tax consultant Paul Sullivan is pushing to lower tax rates on empty land slated for residential development. Credit: Taehoon Kim.

Converting empty lots into garden plots makes the city greener—and also delivers a generous tax break

By Kerry Gold
BC Business
Sept 12, 2017

Excerpt:

A big incentive for developers and landowners to convert empty commercial space into a community garden is the substantial tax break. “Properties just aren’t ready for development, and developers are seeing this as a way to lower cost,” says tax consultant Paul Sullivan, a principal at Vancouver-based commercial real estate appraisal firm Burgess Cawley Sullivan & Associates Ltd.

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September 14, 2017   No Comments

Canada: Victoriaville has set itself a new goal for 2017: to install 100 shared garden boxes throughout town.

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Sophie Legault says front yards often get more sun than backyards where there are more trees. (Julia Page/CBC)

“If have a few plants and a few fruit trees instead of just pretty trees we can become more self-sufficient.”

By Julia Page
CBC News
Sep 04, 2017

Excerpt:

It was awarded a $15,000 grant from the Community Fund for Canada’s 150th in order to realize that initiative.

The wooden boxes, equipped with signs letting people know the produce is for the taking, are set up on people’s front lawns, at restaurants, and in other public spaces.

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September 11, 2017   Comments Off on Canada: Victoriaville has set itself a new goal for 2017: to install 100 shared garden boxes throughout town.

Canada: Young Langley farmer not surprised at downturn in Metro Vancouver agriculture

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Richter said the No. 1 deterrent to farming in the Lower Mainland (which comprises Metro Vancouver and the Fraser Valley) is the cost of land, followed by operating costs, a lack of farming knowledge being passed on and a reluctance by consumers to buy local.

By Jennifer Saltman and Harrison Mooney
Vancouver Sun
Sept 7, 2017

Excerpt:

“I’ve talked to farmers in the Lower Mainland and I worked with some of them here in Langley and they said, ‘Are you sure you’re gonna go into this? Because you’re not gonna be rich,’ ” said Richter, 32, co-owner of The Veggie Patch in Langley.

Richter was responding to a report to be presented Friday to the regional planning committee based on 2016 census data on agriculture.

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September 9, 2017   Comments Off on Canada: Young Langley farmer not surprised at downturn in Metro Vancouver agriculture

Canada: What a Saanich farmer grows at home

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Derek Powell with a morning harvest of tomatoes and chili peppers from late August. The former proprietor of Barefoot Organics at Haliburton Farm grows 40 different vegetable, fruit and herb plants on a 600 square-foot plot in his front yard. Travis Paterson/News Staff

The Urban Food-Garden Tour makes 14 stops across Greater Victoria on Saturday, September 9

By Travis Paterson
Victoria News
Sep 7th, 2017

Excerpt:

One of the stops on this year’s Urban Food-Garden Tour on Saturday is at the home of a former farmer, Derek Powell, who’s now maximizing about 600 square feet in front of his residence on Broadway Street in Saanich.

Powell made a living for four years as the proprietor of Barefoot Organics at Haliburton Farm, and it shows, as his plants are tall and full of fruit. He has more than 40 types of herbs, vegetables and fruits growing.

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September 8, 2017   Comments Off on Canada: What a Saanich farmer grows at home

Canada: Community farming project in Toronto’s Brockton Village grows food in front yards

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Brockton Village farming project started with 250 letters left in mailboxes offering to farm neighbourhood yards. Three months later, five yards have harvested a wide variety of crops, including romaine lettuce, arugula, radishes, turnips, beans, cucumbers, tomatoes and kale.

By Ellen Brait
The Star
Aug. 31, 2017

Excerpt:

Rosenthal said his children, Stella, 7, and Cy, 3, have especially loved their front yard farm. The towering corn stalks stop people on the street, and he said both his kids love giving tours of their plot.

“They love talking about it,” Rosenthal said. “My daughter went to camp and I was with her when she met her bunk mates and she was joking she lived on a farm. It is funny but I had to say, ‘You don’t. Some people might actually live on a farm. You live in the city and there happens to be stuff in your front yard.’ ”

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September 8, 2017   Comments Off on Canada: Community farming project in Toronto’s Brockton Village grows food in front yards

Canada: Think spring now to take your weedy lawn to foodie heaven

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L to R: Conrad Melanson, Luca Gervais, Marianne Gervais and Anne-Marie Gervais have turned their typical backyard into an incredible vegetable garden Jean Levac / Postmedia

Their south-facing 66 by 40 foot Alta Vista backyard also produces beans, peas, lettuce, carrots, tomatoes big and small, sweet and three kinds of hot peppers, chard, kale, garlic, radishes, cucumbers, zucchini and beets.

By Megan Gillis
Ottawa Citizen
Sept 1

Excerpt:

Growing your own food is a burgeoning trend, according to Jordan Bouchard, the coordinator of the Community Gardening Network of Ottawa.

The network is part of non-profit Just Food, which spreads gardening know-how to home and community gardeners from a farm near Blackburn Hamlet while growing produce for food banks and promoting small local growers. The aim is food security for all.

[Read more →]

September 7, 2017   Comments Off on Canada: Think spring now to take your weedy lawn to foodie heaven