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Category — Children

Bronzeville, Milwaukee launches urban agriculture program for low-income children

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Fenceroy said the foundation put $150,000 towards the urban agriculture program this summer because it encourages children to spend time outdoors.

By Pete Zervakis
TMJ4
Jul 27, 2016

Excerpt:

“So the overall goal is to get the kids to understand what fresh tastes like, why it’s good for you,” Espy said. “If they see they don’t have it in their area, they should grow up demanding it or grow it themselves if they can.”

The kids also helped to build a compost bin.

“We’re learning how to cut trees,” said Lanear Rucker, who’s enrolled in the program. “We also learned how to work a saw.”

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August 2, 2016   Comments Off on Bronzeville, Milwaukee launches urban agriculture program for low-income children

Warsaw, Poland, Children working in a vegetable garden during WW2. From the collection of Yad Vashem

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polkids Click on image for larger file. During the first half of 1940, the organization’s aid activities focused on opening public soup kitchens and distributing food to the needy, on taking in the thousands of Jewish refugees and POWs who were pouring into the ghetto, and establishing institutions for childcare.

Janusz Korczack’s orphanage was situated at 92 Krochmalna Street and housed 150 children.

Photographer: Foto Forbert, Warszawa
Origin: Judenrat, Warsaw
ad Vashem Photo Archive

A short time after Warsaw was occupied by the Germans, the Jewish community organized a social welfare committee known as the Zydowska Samapomoc Spolczna (Jewish Social Self-Help), or the ZSS, in order to provide social assistance to the Jewish residents. Funding for the activities came primarily from the Polish branch of the Joint, which was also located in Warsaw. The Joint, short for The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, was an agency that had been founded by Jews in America in 1914 in order to provide aid for Jewish communities located outside the United States. Since it was an American institution, the Joint was permitted to continue its activities in occupied Poland.

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July 23, 2016   Comments Off on Warsaw, Poland, Children working in a vegetable garden during WW2. From the collection of Yad Vashem

Immigrant students dig into learning English at Halifax urban farm

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redhalifNew Canadian students at Citadel High School are learning English while working on an urban farm. Many of the students arrived from Syria this winter and are connecting with their new community by volunteering at Common Roots Urban Farm. See video on the site.

“They love Canada, they understand that they are here to have another chance and they are really thankful,” said Majaess.

By Alexa MacLean
CBC
June 7, 2016

Excerpt:

“The kids are coming once a week to help out and be involved. It’s great because so many of them have a farming background,” Melrose said.

The urban farm opened up in 2012 on the former site of Queen Elizabeth High School.

Part of the produce grown by the students is donated to the food bank.

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June 13, 2016   Comments Off on Immigrant students dig into learning English at Halifax urban farm

New York Yankee players visit ‘Harlem Grown’ and help kids plant food gardens

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Click on image for larger file. (Must see video. Mike.) Follow link to video.

Eight New York players, as well as hip-hop group The Lox and Miss New York USA Serena Bucaj, made their way to Harlem to celebrate Harlem Grown which teaches children how to grow fresh fruits and vegetables at their seven locations across Harlem.

By Nick Suss
MLB.com
June 8th, 2016

Excerpt:

Bronx resident Tony Hillery, the founder of Harlem Grown, explained that he founded the organization when he was at a personal crossroads in 2009. After the recession, he wanted a career change and left his limousine business. He decided it was time he gave back to the community, and so he began volunteering at public schools in Harlem, where he became a favorite of the students.

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June 10, 2016   Comments Off on New York Yankee players visit ‘Harlem Grown’ and help kids plant food gardens

Organic gardens in schools in Serbia

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Organic gardering in schools from Zoran Mitrovi? on Vimeo.

Project Proposal

By Zoran Mitrovi
May 2016

Excerpt:

What we want to do

We want to use our knowledge and to show kids how to grown up healthy food, how to protect and care about environment. At the moment we see that in era of «smart devices» nature losing the race, our children are more in virtual world than in real life. The problem is big and solutions are everywhere, we just need to go out and show the kids really satisfaction.

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May 11, 2016   Comments Off on Organic gardens in schools in Serbia

Thriving School Gardens in St. Louis

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(Must see video. Mike)

Gateway Greening runs 21 such gardens at schools in the city, both public and private, and has a total of 55 in the region. Much of the budget for this work comes from the Monsanto Fund, which this year provided a grant of $205,000 for the youth garden program.

By Daniel Neman
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
May 11, 2016

Excerpt:

That’s right, an orchard grows outside Mallinckrodt Academy, a public elementary school for gifted students. It’s a small orchard — four apple trees, plus a few pear trees, peach, wild plum and currants — but it is growing in the school’s front yard. And even though the trees will not begin to bear significant amounts of fruit until after the students leave the school, the students say they are happy knowing that the work they do today will benefit those who come after them.

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May 11, 2016   Comments Off on Thriving School Gardens in St. Louis

Urban agriculture camp for teens comes to Ottawa region

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Alex Cool-Fergus, project coordinator at Énviro Educ-Action, advertises their new urban agriculture camp for teens. Evelyn Harford / Postmedia.

The group’s urban agriculture summer camp is part of a growing trend for urbanites to connect with farms for locally produced food.

By Evelyn Harford
Ottawa Citizen
April 1, 2016 |

Excerpt:

The teens will get their hands dirty, planting and gardening during the three-week summer camp. They’ll learn about what it means to go from farm to table, and gain a deeper appreciation for their local food systems. They’ll even get to eat some of the produce they grow.

“Don’t bring your iPad, and don’t bring your cell phone; there’s no point,” said Cool-Fergus. “We’re going to be outside all day.”

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April 6, 2016   Comments Off on Urban agriculture camp for teens comes to Ottawa region

One Hen

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A year later, Kojo has built up a flock of 25 hens. With his earnings Kojo is able to return to school. Soon Kojo’s farm grows to become the largest in the region.

Written by Katie Smith Milway
Illustrated by Eugenie Fernandes
Kid Can Press
2008

Inspired by true events, One Hen tells the story of Kojo, a boy from Ghana who turns a small loan into a thriving farm and a livelihood for many.

After his father died, Kojo had to quit school to help his mother collect firewood to sell at the market. When his mother receives a loan from some village families, she gives a little money to her son. With this tiny loan, Kojo buys a hen.

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April 1, 2016   Comments Off on One Hen

My First Book About How Things Grow

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owth

With over 120 stickers of flowers, vegetables, seeds and trees to add to the pages, a glossary, quiz, and naming and spotting games.

Author/Editor: Felicity Brooks
Illustrator: Rosalinde Bonnet
Usborne Publishing Ltd
24 pages + 4 pages stickers

An accessible, informative first reference book that helps young children learn about trees, plants and funghi – what each of these things is, how to tell them apart, what each needs to survive and thrive, and their life cycles, including information about how they reproduce.

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March 27, 2016   Comments Off on My First Book About How Things Grow

Could Urban Farms Be the Preschools of the Future?

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farmsceneThe vision for Nursery Fields Forever. (Courtesy of aut- -aut) Click on image for larger file.

A group of architects proposed a new design to help raise environmentally responsible kids.

By Eillie Anzilotti
City Lab
Mar 7, 2016

Excerpt:

Under the distant gaze of a city skyline, cows and chickens wander through rows of sprouting vegetables; clear glass greenhouses dot the periphery. It sounds like an ordinary urban farm, but on this particular site, the wardens are toddlers.

The farm, Nursery Fields Forever, is the vision of aut- -aut, a group of four architects hailing from Italy and the Netherlands. Their proposal for a preschool on an urban farm took first prize at this year’s AWR International Ideas Competition; the challenge centered around designing a nursery school model for London.

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March 14, 2016   Comments Off on Could Urban Farms Be the Preschools of the Future?

If You Plant a Seed

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“If you plant a carrot seed, a carrot will grow. If you plant a cabbage seed, a cabbage will grow.”

By Kadir Nelson
Balzer + Bray
March 3 2015

Kadir Nelson, acclaimed author of Baby Bear and winner of the Caldecott Honor and the Coretta Scott King Author and Illustrator Awards, presents a resonant, gently humorous story about the power of even the smallest acts and the rewards of compassion and generosity.

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March 9, 2016   Comments Off on If You Plant a Seed

My Dog’s a Chicken

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The girl decides that one of the many chickens roaming their yard could make a suitable dog—especially the black-and-white speckled hen who struts around like she owns the place.

By Susan McElroy Montanari and Anne Wilsdorf
Schwartz & Wade
Feb 2016

Lula Mae wants a puppy, but times are hard and she’ll just have to make do. Her family has plenty of chickens, so she decides maybe a chicken can be a dog.

Pookie, as Lula Mae names her, is an ordinary chicken, but Lula Mae thinks she is very doglike indeed.

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March 3, 2016   Comments Off on My Dog’s a Chicken

Grandpa’s Garden

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This English picture book shows the progression of a garden through the year.

By Stella Fry (Author), Sheila Moxley (Illustrator)
Barefoot Books
2012

This beautifully told story follows Billy from early spring to late summer as he helps his grandpa on his vegetable patch. They dig the hard ground, sow rows of seeds, and keep them watered and safe from slugs. When harvest time arrives they can pick all the vegetables and fruit they have grown. Children will be drawn in by the poetry of the language and the warm illustrations, while also catching the excitement of watching things grow!

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February 27, 2016   Comments Off on Grandpa’s Garden

South Africa: Vegetable Gardens Critical for School Feeding Scheme

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Xolisa Bangani, founder of the Ikhaya Food Garden at Isikhokele Primary School in Site C, Khayelitsha. Photo: Siyavuya Khaya.

“We have 32 orphans and we frequently give them food from the garden. The number of absentees has dropped significantly, because students know that they are going to eat at school,” she says.

By Siyavuya Khaya
Ground Up
Feb 16, 2016

Excerpt:

Bangani said they grow eggplant, spinach, beetroot, pumpkin, green beans and they also have fruit trees. He says the garden is small, but they utilize the space effectively.

Luleka Primary School principal Gcobani Mthoba says the budget for their school feeding scheme is severely strained by rising food prices. The garden also creates some employment for the community.

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February 24, 2016   Comments Off on South Africa: Vegetable Gardens Critical for School Feeding Scheme

Center for Ecoliteracy in Berkeley – 20 years old

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ecli

We’re creating an ebook that will bring soil to life for elementary school students, an interactive guide exploring the links between climate change and food systems, and a new resource focusing on water, power, and the environment.

By Zenobia Barlow
Cofounder & Executive Director
Center for Ecoliteracy

Excerpt from ‘Cultivating 20 Years of Ecoliteracy’:

School Gardens

The Center supported school gardens early, before becoming the first funder of the Edible Schoolyard (ESY) at Martin Luther King, Jr. Middle School in Berkeley in 1996. “Their grant was the catalyst,” said ESY founder Alice Waters.
“The Center sees a very big picture, and has understood deeply what we are trying to do.” The Center offered teacher training at King for a decade.

That engagement set the pattern for later garden projects, especially the emphasis on integrating experiences in gardens, cooking classes, and cafeterias with classroom learning. The Center provided release time and teacher consultation, created and reviewed curricula, and illustrated ways to address academic standards through garden-based learning.

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December 6, 2015   Comments Off on Center for Ecoliteracy in Berkeley – 20 years old