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Category — Children

Urban agriculture camp for teens comes to Ottawa region

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Alex Cool-Fergus, project coordinator at Énviro Educ-Action, advertises their new urban agriculture camp for teens. Evelyn Harford / Postmedia.

The group’s urban agriculture summer camp is part of a growing trend for urbanites to connect with farms for locally produced food.

By Evelyn Harford
Ottawa Citizen
April 1, 2016 |

Excerpt:

The teens will get their hands dirty, planting and gardening during the three-week summer camp. They’ll learn about what it means to go from farm to table, and gain a deeper appreciation for their local food systems. They’ll even get to eat some of the produce they grow.

“Don’t bring your iPad, and don’t bring your cell phone; there’s no point,” said Cool-Fergus. “We’re going to be outside all day.”

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April 6, 2016   Comments Off on Urban agriculture camp for teens comes to Ottawa region

One Hen

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A year later, Kojo has built up a flock of 25 hens. With his earnings Kojo is able to return to school. Soon Kojo’s farm grows to become the largest in the region.

Written by Katie Smith Milway
Illustrated by Eugenie Fernandes
Kid Can Press
2008

Inspired by true events, One Hen tells the story of Kojo, a boy from Ghana who turns a small loan into a thriving farm and a livelihood for many.

After his father died, Kojo had to quit school to help his mother collect firewood to sell at the market. When his mother receives a loan from some village families, she gives a little money to her son. With this tiny loan, Kojo buys a hen.

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April 1, 2016   Comments Off on One Hen

My First Book About How Things Grow

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With over 120 stickers of flowers, vegetables, seeds and trees to add to the pages, a glossary, quiz, and naming and spotting games.

Author/Editor: Felicity Brooks
Illustrator: Rosalinde Bonnet
Usborne Publishing Ltd
24 pages + 4 pages stickers

An accessible, informative first reference book that helps young children learn about trees, plants and funghi – what each of these things is, how to tell them apart, what each needs to survive and thrive, and their life cycles, including information about how they reproduce.

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March 27, 2016   Comments Off on My First Book About How Things Grow

Could Urban Farms Be the Preschools of the Future?

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farmsceneThe vision for Nursery Fields Forever. (Courtesy of aut- -aut) Click on image for larger file.

A group of architects proposed a new design to help raise environmentally responsible kids.

By Eillie Anzilotti
City Lab
Mar 7, 2016

Excerpt:

Under the distant gaze of a city skyline, cows and chickens wander through rows of sprouting vegetables; clear glass greenhouses dot the periphery. It sounds like an ordinary urban farm, but on this particular site, the wardens are toddlers.

The farm, Nursery Fields Forever, is the vision of aut- -aut, a group of four architects hailing from Italy and the Netherlands. Their proposal for a preschool on an urban farm took first prize at this year’s AWR International Ideas Competition; the challenge centered around designing a nursery school model for London.

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March 14, 2016   Comments Off on Could Urban Farms Be the Preschools of the Future?

If You Plant a Seed

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“If you plant a carrot seed, a carrot will grow. If you plant a cabbage seed, a cabbage will grow.”

By Kadir Nelson
Balzer + Bray
March 3 2015

Kadir Nelson, acclaimed author of Baby Bear and winner of the Caldecott Honor and the Coretta Scott King Author and Illustrator Awards, presents a resonant, gently humorous story about the power of even the smallest acts and the rewards of compassion and generosity.

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March 9, 2016   Comments Off on If You Plant a Seed

My Dog’s a Chicken

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The girl decides that one of the many chickens roaming their yard could make a suitable dog—especially the black-and-white speckled hen who struts around like she owns the place.

By Susan McElroy Montanari and Anne Wilsdorf
Schwartz & Wade
Feb 2016

Lula Mae wants a puppy, but times are hard and she’ll just have to make do. Her family has plenty of chickens, so she decides maybe a chicken can be a dog.

Pookie, as Lula Mae names her, is an ordinary chicken, but Lula Mae thinks she is very doglike indeed.

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March 3, 2016   Comments Off on My Dog’s a Chicken

Grandpa’s Garden

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This English picture book shows the progression of a garden through the year.

By Stella Fry (Author), Sheila Moxley (Illustrator)
Barefoot Books
2012

This beautifully told story follows Billy from early spring to late summer as he helps his grandpa on his vegetable patch. They dig the hard ground, sow rows of seeds, and keep them watered and safe from slugs. When harvest time arrives they can pick all the vegetables and fruit they have grown. Children will be drawn in by the poetry of the language and the warm illustrations, while also catching the excitement of watching things grow!

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February 27, 2016   Comments Off on Grandpa’s Garden

South Africa: Vegetable Gardens Critical for School Feeding Scheme

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Xolisa Bangani, founder of the Ikhaya Food Garden at Isikhokele Primary School in Site C, Khayelitsha. Photo: Siyavuya Khaya.

“We have 32 orphans and we frequently give them food from the garden. The number of absentees has dropped significantly, because students know that they are going to eat at school,” she says.

By Siyavuya Khaya
Ground Up
Feb 16, 2016

Excerpt:

Bangani said they grow eggplant, spinach, beetroot, pumpkin, green beans and they also have fruit trees. He says the garden is small, but they utilize the space effectively.

Luleka Primary School principal Gcobani Mthoba says the budget for their school feeding scheme is severely strained by rising food prices. The garden also creates some employment for the community.

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February 24, 2016   Comments Off on South Africa: Vegetable Gardens Critical for School Feeding Scheme

Center for Ecoliteracy in Berkeley – 20 years old

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We’re creating an ebook that will bring soil to life for elementary school students, an interactive guide exploring the links between climate change and food systems, and a new resource focusing on water, power, and the environment.

By Zenobia Barlow
Cofounder & Executive Director
Center for Ecoliteracy

Excerpt from ‘Cultivating 20 Years of Ecoliteracy’:

School Gardens

The Center supported school gardens early, before becoming the first funder of the Edible Schoolyard (ESY) at Martin Luther King, Jr. Middle School in Berkeley in 1996. “Their grant was the catalyst,” said ESY founder Alice Waters.
“The Center sees a very big picture, and has understood deeply what we are trying to do.” The Center offered teacher training at King for a decade.

That engagement set the pattern for later garden projects, especially the emphasis on integrating experiences in gardens, cooking classes, and cafeterias with classroom learning. The Center provided release time and teacher consultation, created and reviewed curricula, and illustrated ways to address academic standards through garden-based learning.

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December 6, 2015   Comments Off on Center for Ecoliteracy in Berkeley – 20 years old

Vancouver’s Fresh Roots is one of four organizations in Canada with large-scale schoolyard market gardens

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Our spinach, lettuce, cilantro, and parsley are all protected from the elements to ensure they are ready to harvest in March.

Fresh Roots Newsletter
November 2015

Excerpt from Fresh Roots Newsletter:

This past month, Fresh Roots attended the Farm to Cafeteria Conference in Montreal. What an incredible adventure! Over 450 people from across the country who are engaged in helping bring delicious, healthy, local food to the plates and minds of students. Fresh Roots was asked to speak about our innovative and inspiring collaboration with the Vancouver School Board, what we’ve learned, and what we’re excited to grow into the future.

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December 2, 2015   Comments Off on Vancouver’s Fresh Roots is one of four organizations in Canada with large-scale schoolyard market gardens

Grow Gardeners: Kid-Tested Gardening with Children

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By Emma Biggs And Steven Biggs
Illustrated by Emma Biggs
2015

My daughter, Emma, sowed the seed for this book.

I remember the day clearly. I watched her playing at her pretend kitchen, arranging small plates, utensils, and cups in the cupboards.

In this kitchen, she loved to “cook” treats for everyone. The main ingredient in her imaginary recipes was little bits of paper. We would often find Emma with paper and scissors. “What are you doing?” my wife, Shelley, and I asked. “Making treats,” she always answered, matter-of-factly, as bits of paper flew everywhere.

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November 27, 2015   Comments Off on Grow Gardeners: Kid-Tested Gardening with Children

Growing a Life – Teen Gardeners Harvest Food, Health, and Joy

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Forthcoming August, 2016

By Illène Pevec, Ph.D.
New Village Press
Forthcoming 09 August 2016

Part engaging conversation, part comprehensive fieldwork, Growing a Life demonstrates just how influential educational and community gardening programs can be for young teens. Follow author Illène Pevec as she travels from rural Colorado to inner city New York, agrarian New Mexico to Oakland, California, in order to study youth gardening and the benefits it contributes to at-risk teen lives. Extensive research, supplemented by beautifully candid interviews with students, illustrate the life altering physical and mental benefits that mentored gardening programs can provide.

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November 26, 2015   Comments Off on Growing a Life – Teen Gardeners Harvest Food, Health, and Joy

Acta Non Verba Youth Urban Farm Project in Oakland, California

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The produce revenue that children earn go directly into their own savings accounts that Acta Non Verba sets up to help support their future education. Acta Non Verba Youth Urban Farm Project.

In 2014 we enrolled around 160 low-income youth in our camps.

By Sarah Small
Food Tank
Oct 26, 2015

Excerpt:

Amani Ali (AA): At Acta Non Verba Youth Urban Farm Project, we provide life-changing access to fresh and healthy foods in the under-served community of East Oakland, CA. We introduce low-income youth and their families to farm-to-table concepts by teaching them to plan, plant, harvest, cook, and sell fresh organic produce. Our youth participants joyfully connect with the soil and increase their awareness of sustainable farming, healthy eating, and environmental stewardship.

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November 1, 2015   Comments Off on Acta Non Verba Youth Urban Farm Project in Oakland, California

Farming gives Madisonville students a chance to grow skills

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The Community School garden teaches students science, technology and life skills. It also helps provide Madisonville with fresh produce thanks to its twice-weekly market.

By Jenny Burman,
WCPO Contributor
Sep 17, 2015

Excerpt:

CINCINNATI — The eggs were sold out early Saturday at Lighthouse Community School’s twice-weekly market.

But the market was full of many other things: organic kale, tomatoes, green onions, carrots, cabbage, collards, turnips, cucumbers and radishes. You also could have purchased chicken coops, outdoor benches and tomato cages.

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September 25, 2015   Comments Off on Farming gives Madisonville students a chance to grow skills

Vegetables Go to School – a nine-year, three-phase initiative

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schotogo

A project to address malnutrition, particularly among children, by establishing comprehensive school vegetable garden programs in selected countries in Africa and in Asia.

Excerpt from their website:

School gardens are gaining prominence due to the promotion of balanced diets, nutrition education, and the development of livelihood skills (FAO, 2010). However, school gardens are not a new concept. In 1957, FAO and UNICEF started the so-called Applied Nutrition Programs aimed at improving nutrition through school and community gardens, which were sometimes combined with small livestock production and fish ponds (FAO, 1966). Drescher (2002) gives an overview of school garden programmes in developing countries and describes success stories as well as failures.

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August 10, 2015   Comments Off on Vegetables Go to School – a nine-year, three-phase initiative