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Category — China

China’s Chengdu farm capitalises on taking rich families back to their roots

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Rick pickings: Sunshine Organic Farm

For the founders of the Sunshine Organic Farm, a working farm and weekend retreat on the city’s south-western outskirts, Chengdu residents’ frustration with urban life presents an opportunity.

By Christian Shepherd
FT.com
Aug. 18, 2016

Excerpt:

Chengdu’s lifestyle is often sold as a relaxed contrast to the crush of China’s east-coast metropolises. Residents like to take it easy. Sleepy tea-houses line the twin rivers that snake through the city and the clack of mah-jong game tiles echoes in back alleys till the early morning.

But as the south-western city grows, the gentle pace of life is under pressure. Once-quiet streets are clogged with traffic. Chengdu is now the most congested city in China and the ninth most congested in the world, according to a recent report by satnav company TomTom. Its once vaunted clean air is also under threat, with the city doing only slightly better than smoggy Beijing in a 2014 air quality ranking of Chinese cities by Greenpeace.

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August 25, 2016   No Comments

Rooftop farming arrives in Chengdu, China

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(Must see. Mike)

“The farm is actually a by-product of the shopping mall here. With proper design and investment, we transformed this rooftop into something useful and provided the public with a free place to learn the science of planting and experience agricultural production,” said rooftop farmer Liu Bo.

China.org
July 21, 2016

Excerpt:

“It surprised me when I stepped onto this rooftop. They have all kinds of vegetables and fruit. And there are species that I don’t know. It’s rare to see such things in big cities,” said Chengdu resident Tang Yan.

Mr. Liu is one of the founders of this city farm. For the past eight years, he has been running a vast rural farm in the suburbs of the city.

“Young people know very little about agricultural production, especially children. They have no idea about the exact procedures of how to plant vegetables and rice. So I came up with the idea of passing on Chinese agricultural traditions to the younger generation, and those living in cities,” said rooftop farmer Liu Bo.

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July 21, 2016   Comments Off on Rooftop farming arrives in Chengdu, China

China Proposes A Fix For Its Crashing Housing Market: “Transplant” 100 Million Farmers Into Its Cities

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Starting next year, China will roll out policy to transform 100 million farmers into registered urban residents

By Tyler Durden
Zero Hedge
Dec 24, 2015

Excerpt:

Beijing is hoping to “transplant” 100 million farmers into registered urban residents, who no longer being migrant workers, will rush to buy real estate in the process soaking up some of the millions of vacant square meters of excess capacity real estate. At least that’s how the thinking goes: “attendees of the meeting agreed that rural residents that move to urban areas should be allowed to register as residents, which would encourage them to buy homes in the city. Property developers have been advised to reduce home prices, according to the statement.”

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December 29, 2015   Comments Off on China Proposes A Fix For Its Crashing Housing Market: “Transplant” 100 Million Farmers Into Its Cities

Rusted-out Shenzhen factory reborn as a thriving urban farm

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Eye-pleasing plots of vegetables growing on the reclaimed site. Photo by Thomas Chung.Click on image for larger file.

Architect Thomas Chung’s award-winning green growing space in Shenzhen was inspired by Hong Kong’s Central district rooftops

By Peta Tomlinson
South China Morning Post
Oct 13, 2015

Excerpt:

The project’s design inspiration came partly from an emerging global trend whereby city dwellers are reconnecting with the hands-on experience of growing crops as a means of offering a more secure, accessible food supply.

“Besides pointing to an attitude and lifestyle change, it’s about experimenting with what can be done with hitherto untapped land resources, such as on rooftops, terraces and balconies, inside parks and under flyovers,” Chung said.

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October 22, 2015   Comments Off on Rusted-out Shenzhen factory reborn as a thriving urban farm

Workers in idle Chinese industrial city turn back to farming

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“Just two old men. It’s boring, nothing to do,” Ma says. “So we just started farming while watching this place.”

CNN
Aug 31, 2015

Excerpt:

TENGZHOU, CHINA (CNN) – The empty buildings are China’s version of Roman ruins. Relics of rapid economic growth, left crumbling by a changing economy.

Tengzhou is considered a small industrial city by Chinese standards. In all, 1.5 million people and a GDP bigger than Jamaica.

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September 9, 2015   Comments Off on Workers in idle Chinese industrial city turn back to farming

China: They left city jobs to farm roaches in their home village

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Mr Wu Songqing with the mulberry branches he uses to grow mu’er. The finance graduate moved back to his village of Guanhe in Anhui province to grow the edible black fungus because he wanted to make a difference. Photo: The Straits Times

Mr Wu’s entrepreneurial story began in 2013 when he realised – on a visit home – that villagers who were breeding silkworms in mulberry trees were discarding their branches. But these were ideal for growing high-quality mu’er.

By Esther Teo
The Straits Times
Aug 23, 2015

Excerpt:

It’s the stuff of nightmares. A single light bulb hangs by a wire from the ceiling of a damp, dimly lit room with hundreds of thousands of cockroaches scurrying about.

Some 400,000, to be exact. They dart between cardboard and egg cartons strung together to provide the dark hiding places they prefer.

It might be creepy to most people, but these six-legged critters being bred for their medicinal properties are rich pickings for 24-year-old Mr Qian Cheng.

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August 31, 2015   Comments Off on China: They left city jobs to farm roaches in their home village

Sanyuanli Community Gardens in Beijing

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Organizers will speak about their accomplishments at August 15th event

By The Sanyuanli Community Garden Team
August 2015

The project aims to start an urban farming movement in Beijing and China by setting up a pilot garden and training a gardening community.

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August 9, 2015   Comments Off on Sanyuanli Community Gardens in Beijing

Tourism-focused farms give Chinese city dwellers a break from urban life

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chinatA woman tends to a vegetable garden at one of the parks. Image: How Hwee Young/Epa

In areas around big cities like Beijing, farms are also offering leisure and tourism activities.

By Lili Sams
Mashable
August 1, 2015

Excerpt:

In 2014, Chinese farms had more than 1.2 billion visitors, according to the China Tourism Association. That’s up from more than 900 million visitors in 2013, which generated $4.7 billion in revenue. To put the popularity of farm tourism in perspective, that accounts for about a third of all holidays in the country.

Farms offer residents of China’s biggest metropolises a refreshing break from urban life, while giving rural populations the chance to earn a decent living.

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August 9, 2015   Comments Off on Tourism-focused farms give Chinese city dwellers a break from urban life

Former factory in China repurposed as massive urban agriculture facility

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The project intersects issues of urban transformation, architecture and urban agriculture with an international cultural event, and explores the possibilities of urban farming in the city and how it can be integrated in urban planning.

By Mihai Andrei
ZME Science
Aug 3, 2015
(Must see. Mike)

Excerpt:

Value Farm is a collective effort farming effort developed by Thomas Chung, together with Tris Kee and Chi Fai Fung; together, they transformed an open area within Ole Bouman’s Value Factory from an abandoned industrial facility into a green, vibrant and useful project. Projects like this one could go a long way to greening highly urbanized areas, involving people to engage in collaborative, healthy and relaxing work, and encouraging them to eat local food.

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August 4, 2015   Comments Off on Former factory in China repurposed as massive urban agriculture facility

China: Villages changed into cities liberating women from farm drudgery

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She spent her childhood working in the fields, feeding the family’s pigs. The destruction of rural China became for Xiao Zhang a liberation – and an opportunity. This is the story of how her life changed as much as her country.

By Carrie Gracie
BBC News
June 22, 2015
(Must See. Mike)

Excerpts:

She’d started helping with the farm work almost as soon as she could walk and when she was 11, she dropped out of school.

“Every family was poor but we were poorer,” she says.

“My mother was often ill. As the eldest I always had to help out, feeding the pigs, working in the fields, looking after the little ones.

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July 1, 2015   Comments Off on China: Villages changed into cities liberating women from farm drudgery

China’s children learn about city farming

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chinakids

Many students, both in elementary school and high school, gather there to learn some knowledge about hydroponics, study the importance and prospect of UPA, and enjoy the vegetable picking together with their parents.

By Jia NI
Chinese Academy of Agriculture Sciences
May 22, 2015

Excerpt from “Food For Cities”

As far as I know, the Urban farming/Urban Peri-urban Agriculture(UPA) is becoming more popular and attracting more attention from the city governors. Take Beijing for example. Since the beginning of this century, the local government, as well as academics and universities, have invested a lot of money and intellectuals in the relevant areas, hoping not only to improve the urban-rural linkage, but also to educate children by setting up some demonstration parks for the citizens, especially for young students.

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June 2, 2015   Comments Off on China’s children learn about city farming

Vertical farming offers solutions for China’s cities

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The design of a vertical farm shown during an expo at the Hainan International Creative Harbor in Haikou, Hainan province in 2011. (File photo/CFP)

It is estimated that by 2030 there will be 800 million people living in China’s cities who need a safe and stable supply of nutrients. By that time, vertical farming practices in cities may play a role in contributing to the supply.

Chinese Times
2015-05-19

Excerpt:

Lin Jinyi plants 800 head of lettuce in his 15 square meters of living space in Hangzhou and can harvest as much as 500 kilos of the vegetable at a time. Without using any growth hormone or chemicals, all the 39-year-old Lin does is hang the plants on poles. It is the purest form of soil-free cultivation.

A former employee of Google China, Lin is now a “modern farmer” who guides Chinese farmers in building vertical farming systems.

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May 27, 2015   Comments Off on Vertical farming offers solutions for China’s cities

Kickstarting Beijing’s Urban Farming Movement

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beij
Photo: SCMP.

The project’s initial objective is to have 30 households participate

By Margaux Schreurs
The Beijinger
Apr 23, 2015

Excerpt:

The Sanyuanli Garden Project, run by the French Youth Economic Chamber of Beijing and RISE, a student environmental association, is doing exactly that on April 26 with their first shot at spurring on an urban farming movement in Beijing. Urban farming has the ability to solve a lot of troubles that residents (especially the elderly) in Beijing face: they will have a way to keep moving, a method to relieve stress, and will help contribute to lowering PM 2.5 levels in the long run. And as a bonus, will supply the city with some much needed aesthetic improvement.

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May 1, 2015   Comments Off on Kickstarting Beijing’s Urban Farming Movement

10,000-sq-metre roof top farm makes waves in China

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A large farm has been built on top of a factory in southwest China’ s Chongqing Municipality. The farm features crops, livestock and even a tractor.

The Economic Times
Mar 6, 2015
(Must see. Mike)

This 10,000-square-metre farm in southwest China’s Chongqing Municipality may look ordinary at first glance.

But this is an exceptional farm situated on top of a sprawling factory that manufactures doors. It is big enough that a tractor is needed to help with farming.

The factory’s staff grow crops there, as well as raise poultry and livestock.

Factory official Lu Xiaoqing explained the company’s rationale for setting it up. “It would be a waste if we left the big rooftop unused. That’s why we created a farming project that involves our staff,” he was quoted as saying by state-run Xinhua news agency.

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March 6, 2015   Comments Off on 10,000-sq-metre roof top farm makes waves in China

Urban Agriculture Makes China’s Cities More Livable

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In the Shapingba district, a house and surrounding gardens are lit by urban light pollution as skyscrapers loom large from a nearby housing development project that are gaining most of the lands in this part of town. Photo by Tim Franco. Click on image for larger file.

Over the next decade and a half, 350 million people, more than the entire population of the United States, will be added to Chinese cities.

By Jianming Cai
Professor, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research (IGSNRR), Chinese Academy of Sciences
In Dawn of the Smart City – Perspectives from New York, Ahmedabad, San Paulo, and Beijing
Wilson Centre 2014

Excerpt:

For almost all of its long history, China has been a predominantly rural society. While in Europe the number of people living in cities surpassed those in
the countryside during the late 19th century,1 China only reached that mark in 2011. But now that it’s come, China’s urbanization is at a torrid pace.

Over the next decade and a half, 350 million people, more than the entire population of the United States, will be added to Chinese cities. Infrastructure is struggling to keep up, surrounding farmland is being encroached, and pollution is a major public health problem. One-fifth of China’s arable land is contaminated4 and three-quarters of the surface water flowing through urban areas is unsuitable for drinking or fishing.5 From many corners there have been calls for a change to more human-centered development that emphasizes social inclusiveness and environmental improvements alongside rational economic growth, rather than dominated by it.

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June 28, 2014   Comments Off on Urban Agriculture Makes China’s Cities More Livable