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Category — Compost

New Chicago Composting Ordinance Helps Urban Farmers

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Chicago Lights is able to run an entire urban farm on top of a concrete pad thanks to compost. Lots and lots of compost. Photo via Modern Farmer (Jacqui Cheng).

Smaller producers like community gardens, as well as those in the urban farm category, will now be able to seek out ingredients to cultivate good compost.

By Anna Boisseau
Medial Reports
Jan 27, 2016

Excerpt:

The ordinance creates two new categories of composters: larger scale urban farms, and tier two facilities, like community gardens. After registering with the city, these agricultural organizations can increase the size of their operation and include offsite materials. Though they cannot accept money for taking organic waste, urban farms will be able to sell their compost.

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January 29, 2016   No Comments

Webinar: Producing Compost for Urban Agriculture: Needs and Opportunities

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Presented by: Bruce Berry, Almost Urban Vegetables – Date: Wednesday February 3rd, 2016

By the Compost Council of Canada

Bruce Berry and Marilyn Firth run Almost Urban Vegetables, a 10-acre family farm, in St. Norbert, Manitoba, on the south edge of Winnipeg.

Eight years ago, they left an urban lifestyle to follow the dream of growing food and living simply.

An engineer by trade, Bruce manages the “how we’ll do it” – the logistics of materials, water, harvesting and equipment.

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January 28, 2016   No Comments

Art of ‘Waste’ — The New York Compost Box Project

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I had the heaviest of the compost boxes (the one with the money box on top) on a little folding cart and was hauling it up over a curb cut to photograph it. It fell off the cart and onto my foot.

The Compostess
November 18, 2015

Excerpt:

Then, there are interactive art-ivists like New York City graphic designer and master composter Debbie Ullman, who has launched a clever food waste project that challenges people to think outside the box as they deposit food scraps inside of one.

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December 7, 2015   Comments Off on Art of ‘Waste’ — The New York Compost Box Project

Compost City: Practical Composting Know-How for Small-Space Living

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Compost City serves all eco-curious citizens from casual hobbyists to staunch activists.

By Rebecca Louie
Roost Books
May 19, 2015

Along with backyard chickeners, balcony beekeepers, rooftop farmers, and community gardeners, urban composters are part of a bumper crop of pioneers who are redefining the green space of crowded towns and cities.

You may think you need a big yard to compost. Think again. Compost City teaches you how to easily choose and care for a compost system that fits perfectly into your (tiny) space, (busy) schedule, and (multifaceted) lifestyle.

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December 3, 2015   Comments Off on Compost City: Practical Composting Know-How for Small-Space Living

Delicious, healthy and sustainable food made with upcycled grain from urban craft breweries.

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Eat Beer! Help ReGrained Grow – Barnraiser from Barnraiser on Vimeo.

Eat Beer

By Dan Kurzrock, Jordan Schwartz
ReGrained
Nov 8, 2015

The urban craft beer industry is booming, but with it so is an unsung food waste problem. ReGrained is a solution to this problem positioned at the nexus of food, craft beer, and sustainability.

ReGrained partners with urban craft breweries in San Francisco and recovers their “spent” grain as an ingredient in delicious and healthy food. This “spent” grain represents 85% of a breweries byproduct, but actually is more nutritive than before it was used brew. Breweries extract the sugar from the grain, leaving all of the plant protein and dietary fiber. Thus, this grain has offers a sustainable source of nutrition!

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November 9, 2015   Comments Off on Delicious, healthy and sustainable food made with upcycled grain from urban craft breweries.

Bear testing a metal compost tumbler

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Jora Canada bear test highlights

August 31, 2015

Black bears trying to get into Jora household composter. June, 2015. If bears can’t get in, can other rodents? Composter was smeared with honey and peanut butter on the outside; inside was filled with fruit, fish, and other bear delicacies.

More here.

September 1, 2015   Comments Off on Bear testing a metal compost tumbler

How dog parks are reducing the impact of pet waste

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Dog poo compost not tested for pathogens should never be used on edible crops.

By Rose Seeman
Alternatives Journal
Aug 11 2015

Excerpt:

Volunteers who maintained the dog run in Notre-Dame-de-Grâce Park in Montreal successfully composted pet waste from 2005 to 2010. They installed one-metre-cubed plastic bins and encouraged owners to put their dogs’ doo in the bins and cover it with donated sawdust. The volunteers then turned the compost when visiting with their pets. Full bins were covered until the compost was finished. Then it was bagged and left as free garden fertilizer. According to Jim Fares, president of the Notre-Dame-de-Grâce Dog Run Association at the time, the process was virtually odourless. The compost quickly became popular and, he says, produced “huge flowers.” (When volunteers dwindled after five years, the city took over park maintenance and discontinued composting.)

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August 12, 2015   Comments Off on How dog parks are reducing the impact of pet waste

Bengaluru, India can reduce the waste it produces by composting at home

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S Laxminarayan, 36, a software engineer by profession, is also a part-time urban farmer.

Smitha Prasad, who started a terrace garden a month back, grows flowers, vegetables, herbs, fruits and succulents. Her collection includes Lantana, Begonia, Anthurium, long beans, ginger, pumpkin, ladies finger, lemon grass, chives, rosemary, aloe vera, grapes, banana, guava and more.

By Ananya Revanna
Deccan Herld
July 11, 2015

Excerpt:

According to Dr Yellappa Reddy, former secretary, Department of Ecology and Environment, we can easily contain the amount of organic waste that is sent to landfills if everyone takes to organic terrace gardening and composting. “Even in urbanised areas, it is possible. The space in individual apartment houses is limited but if five to 10 per cent of the entire land is earmarked for gardening, it will destinely make a difference. One just needs a space that is well aerated and has sufficient light,” he says.

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July 21, 2015   Comments Off on Bengaluru, India can reduce the waste it produces by composting at home

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel Moves To Expand Composting for ‘Urban Agriculture’

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Gardeners at Freedom Garden have dealt with red tape over compost.

Vegetables and eggshells would be allowed to be brought in to be used for composting for ‘urban agriculture,’ previously limited to landscaping waste and whatever was produced onsite.

By Ted Cox
DNA Info
June 25, 2015

Excerpt:

Graham called it “a step forward for Chicago neighborhood gardens,” as well as other urban farmland.

Community farm areas such as Hyde Park’s Freedom Garden have previously been snagged in red tape over restrictions on what materials could be brought in for composting.

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July 9, 2015   Comments Off on Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel Moves To Expand Composting for ‘Urban Agriculture’

The Pet Poo Pocket Guide

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How to Safely Compost & Recycle Pet Waste – Forthcoming May 2015

By Rose Seemann
New Society
May 2015

Eighty-three million dogs and ninety-six million cats call the US home. Dogs alone produce enough waste to fill more than 1,091 football fields 1 foot deep in a single year. Add billions of plastic pick-up bags to the mix, and season well with tons of litter box waste. Scoop a hefty portion into local landfills and seal it tightly to ensure optimal methane production. Clearly, this is a recipe for disaster.

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March 16, 2015   Comments Off on The Pet Poo Pocket Guide

Steel City Soils provides compost to city gardens in Braddock, Pittsburgh

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Dedicated composter Jeff Newman, owner of Steel City Soils, helps build food-growing soils from waste. Photo by Adam Reinherz.

“We need to figure out how to sell product to people running urban farms and community gardens.”

By Adam Reinherz
The Jewish Chronicle
Jan. 7, 2015

Excerpt:

Newman began volunteering with Braddock Farms, an urban garden located on the corner of Braddock Avenue and 10th Street. After several years, Newman achieved two realizations: “I wanted to support urban farming,” he said, “and I wanted to help people grow food.”

Newman, a University of Pittsburgh graduate who studied electrical engineering, researched composting, a process of mixing decaying organic substances. He recognized its value and subsequently developed Steel City Soils, LLC.

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January 20, 2015   Comments Off on Steel City Soils provides compost to city gardens in Braddock, Pittsburgh

Metro Vancouver (population 2.5 million) bans food waste from the garbage

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Organics disposal ban. Waste will be taken to compost facilities in the region

Metro Vancouver
January 2, 2014

Excerpt:

Why food scraps in garbage are a problem

When food and other organic materials end up in the garbage they:

Create methane, a powerful greenhouse gas that adds to global warming. In the landfill, buried under layers of waste and without access to oxygen, food can’t decompose properly.

Use up a lot of precious landfill space. Space is limited, and creating more landfills is undesirable. Over 30% of what we send to the landfill in our region is compostable organics.

Make waste-to-energy processes less efficient because of their high moisture content. About a third of the region’s waste is disposed in the waste-to-energy facility.

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January 2, 2015   Comments Off on Metro Vancouver (population 2.5 million) bans food waste from the garbage

Greenlid’s compostable food scraps bucket is made from recycled cardboard

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“In Canada all municipal compost facilities have their own set of guidelines but all accept egg cartons and soiled paper.”

Excerpts from web site:

What is the container made from?

The Greenlid container is made of end of life recycled cardboard and newsprint. It is the same material that egg cartons are made from. The shredded/pulped cardboard is made into our Greenlid container shape and this allows the containers to effectively break down in compost facilities and active home compost piles just like those egg cartons.

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December 28, 2014   Comments Off on Greenlid’s compostable food scraps bucket is made from recycled cardboard

Student-designed “Vermiculture Furniture” for home composting

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Photo by Amy Youngs /Ann Silverman.

“Vermiculture Furniture” course held at Ohio State University

By Kimberley Mok
TreeHugger
February 10, 2014

Excerpt:

Hoping to use design to bridge the gap between worms and humans in the home, Kay Bea Jones, Associate Professor of Architecture at Ohio State University, along with artist Ann Silverman and Associate Professor of Art Amy Youngs, recently taught a “Vermiculture Furniture” course that got fourteen students of different disciplines to come up with their own idea of what it means to “design with the compost cycle in mind, and invite worms into the home.” On the course page they explain how a thoughtfully designed kitchen could do much to integrate and “normalize” composting in our daily lives:

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February 17, 2014   Comments Off on Student-designed “Vermiculture Furniture” for home composting

The Compost Club in Sonoma County, California

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A loan of $5,000 helps me to buy materials (culvert and shade cloth), plywood lids, worms, and a trommel screen sifter to complete a production farm to supply and sell compost worms.

By Rick Kaye, Founder
The Compost Club
Dec 26, 2013

Our nonprofit, The Compost Club, has been introducing school and business wide vermicompost systems in Sonoma County, California since 2003. More than 15 sites participate in our program, which now diverts 44,000 lbs. of food scraps from the landfill each year. We have an excellent track record diverting organic waste and educating others about alternatives for handling waste.

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December 31, 2013   Comments Off on The Compost Club in Sonoma County, California