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Category — Compost

How flies and maggots are being bred to eat your food waste and keep Singapore clean

Dead larvae are broken down into feed for chickens and fish. (Photo: Pichayada Promchertchoo)

The compost the farm uses to grow its vegetables is generated with the help of the black soldier fly larvae.

By Jack Board
Channel Asia News
Mar 24, 2018

Excerpt:

Away from the laboratories buzzing with hundreds of “romantic” flies and their crawling offspring, the experiment is being rolled out for real at Citizen Farm in Queenstown.

The expansive 7,000 square metre green space is surrounded by Singapore’s high rises on land formerly occupied by a prison, Jalan Penjara, and is an area that has been transformed from a dilapidated space to a functioning urban farm.

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March 30, 2018   Comments Off on How flies and maggots are being bred to eat your food waste and keep Singapore clean

Composting with worms: how to get started, and why it could spark an urban gardening revolution

The Urbalive worm composter could offer small space gardeners the option to send less to landfill.

I think it’s a certain kind of gardener who will enjoy the challenge of a wormery. I don’t think we’re going to take over the world.

By Alice Vincent
Telegraph
3 Mar 2018

Excerpt:

Finding a suitable contraption for a small balcony – not to mention a single-person household – has proved tricky. Surprisingly, my relatively small output of vegetable waste and humble ambitions make me a good candidate for vermiculture: a wormery, for instance, could struggle to process the remnants created by a vegan family of four, but as someone who eats a lot of eggs, drinks a lot of tea, and just wanted to make the journey out to the big bin less often, I could be the perfect worm custodian.

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March 6, 2018   Comments Off on Composting with worms: how to get started, and why it could spark an urban gardening revolution

Malaysia: FOLO community farm makes compost and transforms food waste into food for over 100 families.


Video by Lucy Sherriff on February 18th, 2018. See more.

In Malaysia, many farmers are forced to survive on low wages, job insecurity and unsafe working environments. Meanwhile, low-income communities struggle to find affordable, fresh vegetables – and trust in supermarkets to provide quality produce is low.

Excerpt from Folo’s website:

Every day, 25,000 to 30,000 tons of waste is generated in Malaysia. Over 90% of it is not recycled. Of that, 45-60% is organic waste.

That means that an average of around 15,000 tons of organic waste go wastefully (and harmfully) to landfills every day. That’s the weight of 15,000 cars, or 7,500 elephants, per day!

That’s just the official stuff. Near our farm, illegal dumping continues every day. Painfully, we watch truck after truck of waste drive past us looking to unload at the next quiet valley, many of which hold the scarce biodiversity remaining in our city.

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March 3, 2018   Comments Off on Malaysia: FOLO community farm makes compost and transforms food waste into food for over 100 families.

Canada: Verifying Safety of Compost Used for Vegetable Production

Figure 2. E. coli and fecal coliform measurements in market ready composts in British Columbia after rewetting and incubation for 24-48 hours.

The future of our organic vegetable industry, as well as the future of our organics recycling industry relies on us all participating to ensure the safety of our produce.

By John Paul, PhD PAg
Transform Compost
Jan 30, 2018

Excerpt:

What can we do to provide assurance that potential pathogens from compost do not enter the food chain? There is evidence identifying the risk of potential pathogen regrowth, including E. coli, particularly with immature compost. Researchers have identified potential human pathogenic organisms that can enter a VNBC (Viable but not Culturable) state, including antibiotic resistant E. coli, which allows them to survive the high temperatures required for the composting process.

In a review of the OMRI Listed (OMRI Canada) residential food waste and yard waste compost produced by the City of Whitehorse, we conducted further testing to ensure that potential pathogens would not regrow. Compost samples were taken from various stages in the aerated windrow composting process, stored at 5-15 C for 48 hours, then sent to the laboratory to measure fecal coliform and maturity. We found that compost that met the CCME maturity requirement (< 4 mg CO2-C/g OM/day) still had risk of fecal coliform regrowth, and there was no regrowth in compost having a respiration rate below 1.5 CO2-C/g OM/day). The OMRI approved compost marketed by the City of Whitehorse was determined to be safe with no potential for potential pathogen regrowth.

See full paper by following the link below.

Compost Safety Verification Jan 30 2018

March 2, 2018   Comments Off on Canada: Verifying Safety of Compost Used for Vegetable Production

1990 Flashback: Compost Bins Featured at the Vancouver Compost Demonstration Garden

City Farmer’s Lorenzo Mele shows our bins to the media

CBC’s “Down to Earth”
Part 1 and 2, 1990
At the Vancouver Compost Demonstration Garden

In those early days, we brought ‘home compost bins’ from Europe and invited inventors to create bins that were rodent-resistant. One of the bins was built by Lorenzo Mele, eventually named the ‘Lorenzo Bin’, which was based on a design that City Farmer created for the cover of a brochure we’d produced for the Greater Vancouver Regional District (GVRD) now ‘Metro Vancouver’. The design came after a year’s research, talking with experts about how to ‘build out’ rodents from compost pile.

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February 1, 2018   Comments Off on 1990 Flashback: Compost Bins Featured at the Vancouver Compost Demonstration Garden

Flashback to 1990: City Farmer Promotes Home Composting

The Vancouver Compost Demonstration Garden in 1990

The styles have changed but the message is the same

By Michael Levenston
TV reporting at Vancouver’s Compost Demonstration Garden
2150 Maple Street, Vancouver, BC
1990

Most of the bins we feature today are different from the ones we experimented with three decades ago, but our work remains the same, getting urban residents to recycle some of their yard and kitchen scraps and turning it into soil by home composting.

Vancouver Engineering, Solid Waste, has supported us in this effort. John Evans, Paul Henderson, Chris Underwood are three of the leaders at the City of Vancouver who have driven our work. Backyard bins are still sold at a subsidized rate of $25 per bin, worm composting is still taught in schools and at adult wormshops, and research on the latest bins and techniques is ongoing.

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January 16, 2018   Comments Off on Flashback to 1990: City Farmer Promotes Home Composting

City Farmer Flashback 2001: York House Kindergarten Kids Learn About Worms

City Farmer’s Moberley Luger teaches children about worm composting at the Vancouver Compost Demonstration Garden.

Flashback by Michael Levenston
Suzette Myers reporting at that time
TV News 2001

These youngsters marched into our garden in their school uniforms (à la Madeline children’s book) and delighted us with their sweet engagement with worms. Moberley Luger, then a young instructor, now a university professor of English, gave the students their first experience at composting.

For over twenty five years, City Farmer has lead such classes both at our demonstration garden and in Vancouver schools. Young visitors see how compost from a worm bin feeds the soil as was they walk about after the class, tasting, touching and smelling the plants we grow.

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January 3, 2018   Comments Off on City Farmer Flashback 2001: York House Kindergarten Kids Learn About Worms

Singapore: ‘Closed loop’ urban farm in Queenstown tackles food waste with insects

Located in Queenstown, Citizen Farm grows vegetables, edible flowers, mushrooms, as well as jade perch fish. (Photo: Wendy Wong)

The farm currently produces around 150kg of vegetables and fish a month, and goes through the same weight of food waste a day for its insect farm, which currently houses about 10kg of the black soldier fly’s pupae.

By Wendy Wong
Channel News Asia
Nov 26, 2017

Excerpt:

As the Government ramps up efforts to reduce food waste and raise awareness of the problem, one urban farm in Singapore has been trying to lighten this load with the help of an insect.

Set up earlier this year, Citizen Farm in Queenstown has been using the black soldier fly to help grow its vegetables, as food for its fish and to help tackle food waste – the first in Singapore to incorporate these insects as part of farming practice.

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December 2, 2017   Comments Off on Singapore: ‘Closed loop’ urban farm in Queenstown tackles food waste with insects

Worms Eat My Garbage, 35th Anniversary Edition

How to Set Up and Maintain a Worm Composting System: Compost Food Waste, Produce Fertilizer for Houseplants and Garden, and Educate Your Kids and Family

By Mary Appelhof, Joanne Olszewski, Amy Stewart
Worm Woman Inc.
December 2017

For more than three decades, this best-selling guide to the practice of vermicomposting has taught people how to use worms to recycle food waste into nutrient-rich fertilizer for houseplants or gardens. Small-scale, self-contained worm bins can be kept indoors, in a basement or even under the kitchen sink in an apartment — making vermicomposting a great option for city dwellers and anyone who doesn’t want or can’t have an outdoor compost pile.

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November 24, 2017   Comments Off on Worms Eat My Garbage, 35th Anniversary Edition

Canada: What to do with those Jack-o’-lanterns after Halloween?



Go to timeline: 01:52:25 to hear the four minute piece.

City Farmer’s Lynsey Dobbie answers that question on CBC Radio

City Farmer has composted in dozens of bins over the years. We recommend ‘rodent-resistant’ bins to all Vancouver gardeners because rats are a common pest in our City.

Some of the bins:

FreeGarden Earth Bin: In 2017, The City of Vancouver began offering this plastic bin for sale at a subsidized rate of $25.

Cedar Creek Bin: All bins are lined with 19 gauge galvanized wire mesh to aid rodent resistance.

[Read more →]

November 2, 2017   Comments Off on Canada: What to do with those Jack-o’-lanterns after Halloween?

Compost Production For Metro Atlanta’s Urban Farms And Community Gardens

52 Urban Farms • 63 Farmers Markets • 169 School Gardens • 402 Community Gardens

Closing the Loop: Food Waste in Atlanta
Strategies to Increase Sustainable Compost Production for Metro Atlanta’s Urban Farms and Community Gardens.
Food Well Alliance
2017

Excerpt:

Urban farmers and community gardeners know how important healthy soil is to producing sustainably-grown, locally-sourced food and building community.

Food Well Alliance began focusing on soil’s importance to our food system in 2014. Prior to convening its Community-based Composting Working Table, Food Well Alliance conducted a local market research study, and learned:

An estimated 8,000 to 9,000 community gardeners are located within the following Metro Atlanta counties: Clayton, Cobb, DeKalb, Fulton, and Gwinnett

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July 7, 2017   Comments Off on Compost Production For Metro Atlanta’s Urban Farms And Community Gardens

Worms at Work

Harnessing the Awesome Power of Worms with Vermiculture and Vermicomposting

By Crystal Stevens
New Society Publishers
June 1, 2017

Increasingly, we want to know where our food comes from, who grows it and how it is grown, and interest in permaculture, backyard composting, and gardening in general, is growing. So how does the budding gardener ensure that the soil is healthy and nutrient-rich enough to support growing some great food? One answer — worms! Vermiculture is the healthiest and most cost-effective way to ensure that your soil receives the nourishment that it needs. A simple vermicompost bin can produce completely natural, nutrient-rich fertilizer that can be used to boost soil health and, in turn, increase crop yield.

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May 25, 2017   Comments Off on Worms at Work

Compost Stew

An A to Z Recipe for the Earth

By Mary McKenna Siddals
Ashley Wolff (Illustrator)
Dragonfly Books
Oct 14 2014

Excerpt:

“It has great rhyming and rhythm and a fun chorus for the kids to learn. We used it on the day we planted seeds for our garden boxes. If your children know the difference between garbage and recycling and you want to add compost to their understanding of waste, this book is where to start. Great for learning about waste, the environment, plants and community! My 20 month old asks for it by name.”

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March 27, 2017   Comments Off on Compost Stew

Amy M. Youngs’ Worm Composter Works By Rocking in a Chair


See the video of the machine in operation.

‘Machine For Living Independently’

By Amy M. Youngs
(Must see. Mike)

The plants, worms and bacteria living in this sculpture rely on each other and on human participation. They are fed entirely on waste generated by us: coffee grounds and veggie scraps from our kitchen, old newspapers and shredded junk mail from our offices, and carbon dioxide from our breath. They are watered by our rocking leisurely in the chair, which mechanically pushes water up to the top of the ecosystem and causes it to circulate through each part; delivering to the plant roots aerated water that has been fertilized by the worms living in the stream.

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March 14, 2017   Comments Off on Amy M. Youngs’ Worm Composter Works By Rocking in a Chair

Pee Wee Meets the Pollinators

The 6th book about Pee Wee the red wiggler worm

By Larraine Roulston
Castle Compost
2017

In this story, Nancy, Pee Wee and Reddy visit a rooftop garden and learn about the amazing work of pollinators. During their adventure they witness the birth of a monarch butterfly, follow a bee and meet a chorus of crickets. The story features composting, vermicomposting, compost tea and finished compost. It also contains poems, songs as well as additional notes to benefit teachers, parents and children.

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January 22, 2017   Comments Off on Pee Wee Meets the Pollinators