New Stories From 'Urban Agriculture Notes'
Random header image... Refresh for more!

Category — Design

Los Angeles: Company feeds growing edible landscaping trend

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

These raised beds are installed at one of the California apartment complexes. Photo: Farscape.

A small agrihood consisting of eight to 10 raised beds, six orchard trees and mulching starts around $20,000 and only goes up from there as the size and complexity is increased.

By Jill Odom
Total Landscape Care
Mar 14, 2017

Excerpt:

Farmscape has currently installed over 600 urban farms to date and maintains more than 250 of those locations.

The smaller agrihoods can be designed to fit 500 square feet while large agrihoods can take up several acres of land.

“We design each project to match the neighborhood and the future residents,” Hermanson said.

[Read more →]

March 21, 2017   No Comments

Amy M. Youngs’ Worm Composter Works By Rocking in a Chair

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+


See the video of the machine in operation.

‘Machine For Living Independently’

By Amy M. Youngs
(Must see. Mike)

The plants, worms and bacteria living in this sculpture rely on each other and on human participation. They are fed entirely on waste generated by us: coffee grounds and veggie scraps from our kitchen, old newspapers and shredded junk mail from our offices, and carbon dioxide from our breath. They are watered by our rocking leisurely in the chair, which mechanically pushes water up to the top of the ecosystem and causes it to circulate through each part; delivering to the plant roots aerated water that has been fertilized by the worms living in the stream.

[Read more →]

March 14, 2017   Comments Off on Amy M. Youngs’ Worm Composter Works By Rocking in a Chair

British designer Vanessa Harden’s Subversive Gardener line of jewelry and accessories

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

They tap into the urban, guerrilla gardening movement in which gardeners take over vacant lots or concrete medians for gardens. Harden creates ball caps with hidden garden rakes, rings with garden tools embedded in the design and other sly, clever accessories.

By Vanessa Harden
(Must see. Mike)

Tools for Her is the new collection of accessories designed to function as guerrilla gardening tools. Tools for Her presents a trio of brass ‘nail-dusters’ that can be used as a spade, rake and shovel in urban gardening. Each tool is paired with fabulous nail polish and seed varieties to stylishly integrate gardening assaults into the guerrilla gardener’s daily routine.

[Read more →]

March 8, 2017   Comments Off on British designer Vanessa Harden’s Subversive Gardener line of jewelry and accessories

Build You Own Ikea ‘Growroom’

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

Click on image for larger file.

The Plans: The Growroom – a spherical garden that enables people to grow their own food locally within our cities and in a beautiful and sustainable manner

The Growroom is designed by:
Sine Lindholm, Mads-Ulrik Husum & SPACE10

Excerpt:

The design received a lot of attention from all over the world, which is why we today release the design/cutting files and simple instructions, so people around the world can build their very own Growroom inside their own neighbourhoods.

We already know that the open source design files will be used to build The Growroom in Helsinki, Taipei, Rio de Janeiro and San Francisco, but this is just the beginning, because we hope to see The Growroom pop up in cities across the world.

[Read more →]

February 17, 2017   Comments Off on Build You Own Ikea ‘Growroom’

Martha Stewart: A Winter Harvest from My Vegetable Greenhouse

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+


Here’s Ryan harvesting some cutting celery, another ingredient of my green juice. This hardy annual can be used in place of celery and is easier to grow. The fine green leaves and thin hollow stems are especially good to flavor soups and stews.

Photos from her food producing greenhouse

Martha Up Close and Personal Blog
Feb 7, 2017

Excerpt:

My expansive outdoor vegetable garden is bare, but I’m fortunate to have lots of wonderful vegetables growing in the ground in a special greenhouse located behind my Equipment Barn. As many of you know, its design was inspired by Eliot Coleman, an expert of four-season farming.

[Read more →]

February 14, 2017   Comments Off on Martha Stewart: A Winter Harvest from My Vegetable Greenhouse

University of Arizona: Urban agriculture: feeding the future

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

Video Interviews

Directed and edited by Logan Nagel
Interviews conducted by Chandler Donald
Videography by Aiden Vens
Arizona Daily Wildcat
Feb 4, 2017

University of Arizona – Tucson – Spring 2017. In light of a campus-wide rooftop garden design competition, we spoke with a number of experts about their thoughts on landscape architecture, growing food, and nature in cities.

February 11, 2017   Comments Off on University of Arizona: Urban agriculture: feeding the future

Urban farming in suburban Phoenix becomes the basis for an entire community hub

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

Click on image for larger file. An 18-acre site in South Phoenix with spaces for farming, gardening, education and community.

DSGN AGNC’s Spaces Of Opportunity, an 18-acre site in South Phoenix, Arizona, that is much more than just a place for growing: It’s also a community hub, an art center, and a music venue.

By Sam Lubell
The Architect’s Newspaper
January 24, 2017

Excerpt:

“The idea is that farming here is an excuse to bring services to this area,” said DSGN AGNC principal and founder Quilian Riano. “A way to bring economic opportunity.”

The semi-suburban area is home primarily to low- and middle-income Latino and African American populations. It’s also the site of a food desert, meaning that fresh food is very difficult to find. “There are more liquor stores than grocery stores here,” noted Riano.

[Read more →]

February 2, 2017   Comments Off on Urban farming in suburban Phoenix becomes the basis for an entire community hub

‘Urban Farm’ Theme Park Developed in Moscow, Russia

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

To create a children’s educational complex around Kamensky Pond – – “a farm in the city”, where children will be able to familiarise themselves with nature, find out what various animals look like, and where their milk, vegetables and fruit come from.

By Wowhaus
Chief architect of the project: Alyona Zaitseva
Architects: Gleb Galkin, Darya Listopad, Anastasia Izmakova, Yevgeny Reshetov, Margarita Leonova, Maria Khokholova, Alexandra Kim, Maria Khokhlova, Denis Manshilin and Ivan Korenkov
Master Plan: Nina Smirnova
Chief Structural Engineer: Dmitry Belostotskiy

Excerpts:

The farm offers a new type of leisure activity for children and parents in Moscow, educating children about the natural world through direct contact with nature.

The northern areas bordering on the Botanical Gardens have a historical connection with the theme of agriculture. Here were located the Pig Rearing, Sheep Rearing and Poultry Farming pavilions. The site of the present farm was that of the Hunting pavilion and the so called Hunting Track, with its enclosures for wild animals. The pavilion burnt down long ago, and only two statues remain – the Hunter and the Fox Breeder, which now stand to greet visitors to the farm. The farm itself thus represents a logical continuation of the site’s history.

[Read more →]

January 26, 2017   Comments Off on ‘Urban Farm’ Theme Park Developed in Moscow, Russia

Portland Urban Intentional Community has 46 private garden plots for resident use

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+


Kailash Ecovillage is a sustainably focused community located on a two-acre site in inner SE Portland, Oregon. Click on image for larger file.

They even filled in the swimming pool from the old apartment complex (that again, due to Portland’s temperate climate, was very underused) to make room for more garden space.

By Scott Cooney
Green Living Ideas
Jan 2, 2017

Excerpt:

In addition, as food is so central to a sustainable community, probably the most impressive part of Kailash is the garden. Or should we say gardens – there are 46 private garden plots for resident use, and an extensive community garden. They also have a bamboo micro-forestry project, berry bushes, grapevines, fruit orchards, and a greenhouse. They have also created areas dedicated for wildlife habitat, including bird houses, bat houses, bee boxes and reptile gardens.

[Read more →]

January 11, 2017   Comments Off on Portland Urban Intentional Community has 46 private garden plots for resident use

What’s Good In The Agrihood? Can it work in Philadelphia?

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

Where an urban or community farm offers an opportunity for people to supply themselves and their neighbors with fresh produce, an agrihood focuses on making a farming outfit the very center of a small community, the way manufacturing used to be.

By Quinn O’callaghan
The Philadelphia Citizen
Dec 28, 2016

Excerpt:

Kuck says that the top selling point of such agrihoods would be the fact that they help legitimize the usefulness and utility of accommodating for green spaces in modern urban planning. “Even 30 years ago, there were 500 community gardens and backyard plots without support, and we lost a lot of those developments by not prioritizing how green spaces play a role in how we shape and plan for cities,” Kuck says. “In some ways, the term ‘agrihood’ is a little bit irrelevant to me, but if it gets people thinking about planning and galvanizing them in the future, that’s great.”

[Read more →]

January 6, 2017   Comments Off on What’s Good In The Agrihood? Can it work in Philadelphia?

Happy New Year from City Farmer! It’s our 39th Year

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

Click on image for larger file.

Maria’s Compost Garden hops went into our beer again this year

More varieties and a bigger crop made this year’s ‘Rail Ale’ a treat. Named for the big changes that took place next to our garden; the century old railway line was pulled up. A new Greenway era begins for use by pedestrians and cyclist.

[Read more →]

December 31, 2016   Comments Off on Happy New Year from City Farmer! It’s our 39th Year

Berkeley sprouts creative housing, topped by a working farm

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+


The rooftops at the Garden Village modular apartment complex on Dwight Way in Berkeley are under cultivation. Photo: Santiago Mejia, The Chronicle.

In all, one-third of an acre of “land” is available for farming.

By John King
San Francisco Chronicle
December 24, 2016
(Must see. Mike)

Excerpt:

Two of the interior pods stop at three levels and are topped by communal terraces that get use throughout the day when studies and weather allow. One more level up, you encounter the startling contrast of panoramic views — and a dissected farm where you can touch the ground or snip off a sprig of parsley.

This time of year, between harvests, some pods show nothing but dirt. Others are softened by abundant mounds of green parsley and purple kale. One roof is dotted with red radishes waiting to be picked.

[Read more →]

December 31, 2016   Comments Off on Berkeley sprouts creative housing, topped by a working farm

Merry Christmas from City Farmer!

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

Click on image for larger file.

Looking Through Our New Iron Gate – Created By Davide Pan

During the summer, metal artist Davide Pan created a new window/gate at the Compost Garden. It faces the City of Vancouver’s new Arbutus Greenway. The Greenway corridor, recently purchased from the Canadian Pacific Railway, stretches 11 kilometres from near downtown Vancouver to the Fraser River.

The Compost Garden will draw in thousands of new visitors who will travel this new transportation corridor by foot and bike.

[Read more →]

December 25, 2016   Comments Off on Merry Christmas from City Farmer!

AgroBox mural completed at Bryan High School, Nebraska

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+


Mural painted by Hugo Zamorano.

More than 100 Bryan students are part of the Urban Agriculture Career Academy and the school also has one of the largest Future Farmers of America chapters in the Nebraska.

By Eric Taylor
Bellevue Leader
Dec 13, 2016

Excerpt:

Hugo Zamorano, a 2010 Bryan grad, completed a mural that graces the AgroBox at the school. The mural, and the AgroBox, were on display during an open house and ribbon cutting Friday afternoon at the school.

Chris Moorman, CEO of Rubicon Agriculture, was on hand for the event. Rubicon is an Indiana-based agricultural manufacturing company that created the AgroBox, which is an automated hydroponic growing facility built inside of an up-cycled 40-foot shipping container.

[Read more →]

December 22, 2016   Comments Off on AgroBox mural completed at Bryan High School, Nebraska

In Philadelphia, A Victorian Home With An Urban Farm

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+


When this house went on the market, Andrew Olson and Neal Santos seized the opportunity. It enabled them to fully commit to their urban garden, Farm 51 on the adjacent lot.

But before there was a picturesque farm stand, there were thousands and thousands of pounds of trash to be hauled, weed trees to be cut back and general debris to clean up.

By Quelcy Kogel
Design Sponge
Dec 12, 2016

Excerpt:

With a background in horticulture, Andrew was in search of a place to live where he could garden and keep chickens and bees. He found an amenable landlord, which landed him on 51st Street, but his green thumb quickly surpassed the yard and spilled into the adjoining abandoned city lot. Andrew and Neal began working with the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society’s City Harvest Program, which equipped them with compost, lumber and seedlings, enabling them to expand their garden endeavor. Farm 51 was born and became a community hub (as evidenced by the many pictures of cute kids tending to vegetables via Instagram).

[Read more →]

December 19, 2016   Comments Off on In Philadelphia, A Victorian Home With An Urban Farm