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Category — England

UK: The Manchester allotment where refugees and asylum seekers are growing vegetables together

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“I think the main things people get from Growing Together Levenshulme are a supportive community and a space to take time away from their difficult and often chaotic lives as asylum seekers.

By Lucy Lovell
Manchester Evening News
Aug 13, 2017

Excerpt:

” In future we’d love to be able to grow the project by opening the garden to participants on more days of the week, which is something they’re really keen for us to do, but in order to do that we’d need more funding and more volunteers.

“At the moment we’re just looking for funding to secure the long term future of the garden so it can continue to benefit asylum seekers and refugees for years to come.”

And what about the future for Emilie?

[Read more →]

August 19, 2017   No Comments

UK: ‘Countryfile Live TV Show – agricultural escapism or city-slicker sell out?

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BBC Countryfile presenters Adam Henson, John Craven, Charlotte Smith, Tom Heap, Anita Rani, Matt Baker and Ellie Harrison. Photograph: Justin Goff.

At least half of Countryfile’s viewers live in towns and cities.

By Paul MacInnes
The Guardian
Aug 8, 2017

Excerpts:

Since it moved in 2009 from its original Sunday morning slot to peak-time evening viewing, the programme has become more obviously aimed at an urban demographic. Issues of concern to farmers and those who make a living in rural areas are still covered, but they are less prominent than the features which either introduce aspects of the British countryside to a new audience or simply show it off. It also has the week’s most-watched weather forecast.

[Read more →]

August 16, 2017   No Comments

UK: Police help transform overgrown allotment into peaceful community garden

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Durahm Police help transform overgrown allotment into peaceful community garden in Deneside, Seaham.

“Anti-social behaviour has gone right down. There is a real community spirit now. That was always our aim.”

The Northern Echo
Aug 4, 2017

Excerpt:

PCSO Aimee Guest, who works closely with DAG, said: “They have completely transformed the overridden area into a peaceful oasis for the community.

“They continue to inspire me by their initiative and drive to create change for the good of the local people. I am extremely proud. It can now become the heart of the estate. It is open to all.”

[Read more →]

August 13, 2017   No Comments

Edinburgh and Glasgow plan a community food growing revolution

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A team from Possil health centre in Glasgow tend to their allotment box. Picture: John Devlin/TSPL

Scotland’s largest local authority is already planning ahead by speaking with residents on how they can grow food in their own neighbourhoods.

By Chris Mccall
Scotsman
Aug 3, 2017

Excerpt:

The consultation by Glasgow City Council attracted hundreds of responses from individuals and community groups, the results of which will now be analysed before being presented to councillors.

“We are delighted with the level of response,” a council spokeswoman told The Scotsman. “This shows how excited Glaswegians are about all sorts of food growing opportunities.”

[Read more →]

August 11, 2017   No Comments

UK: Reclaiming the Lost Gardens of Totnes

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Looking after the Lost Gardens of Totne.

The 150-year-old kitchen garden in the grounds of Totnes’s Kennicott Sixth Form College was once part of a working Victorian estate boasting hothouses growing grapes and nectarines.

By Steve Peacock
Totnes Today
3 August 2017

Excerpt:

But for the past 20 years it has fallen into disrepair, with its use restricted to partial employment as an allotment.

Earlier this year a ­garden design day was organised as the first step in regenerating the kitchen garden as an education resource for the community and the school.

Staff from the school backed the latest effort, as they got stuck in alongside the students.

[Read more →]

August 9, 2017   No Comments

UK: Urban farming project makes BBC Countryfile debut

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Dr Jens Thomas and Dr Paul Myers with BBC presenter James Wong at the Guild’s rooftop farm.

The programme highlighted how Farm Urban uses aquaponics as an educational tool to teach local people about hi-tech future food systems, inspire them to connect with their environment and empower them to make positive and informed choices.

The University of Liverpool
Aug 2, 2017

Excerpt:

A pioneering social enterprise founded by two University of Liverpool scientists is featured on the latest episode of the BBC’s Countryfile.

Farm Urban develops and tests the most efficient ways to grow food in urban environments, focusing primarily on aquaponics systems, which grow fish and vegetables simultaneously in a closed-loop ecosystem.

[Read more →]

August 8, 2017   Comments Off on UK: Urban farming project makes BBC Countryfile debut

UK: With urban grit and pink lights, London warehouse farms fish and greens

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Click image to see larger file.

Hofman sells 200,000 bags of salad each year to local food retailers and restaurants.

By Lin Taylor
Reuters
July 26, 2017

Excerpt:

It’s a far cry from traditional British farms that sprawl across acres of land. But for Kate Hofman, who co-founded GrowUp Urban Farms in 2013, producing food in this 6,000 square feet building in Beckton was not only clever and cost-effective, it was also a sustainable way to feed people in the city.

“Sometimes people have an idealized idea of how their food is being produced. In their head, they think that farmer Joe tends to his field with his hoe and grows his heads of lettuce,” the 32-year-old told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

[Read more →]

August 3, 2017   Comments Off on UK: With urban grit and pink lights, London warehouse farms fish and greens

UK gardening guru said Britain had seen a resurgence in interest in gardening, with allotments in particular enjoying a spectacular revival

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Monty Don added: ‘Thankfully allotment society picked back up again. In the last thirty years, people have got much more interested growing fresh food, seasonable food’

“There was a deliberate plan after the Second World War not to have more allotments because they are associated with war time.”

By Tom Payne
The Daily Mail
3 July 2017

Excerpt:

Whereas 20 years ago people would struggle to see the benefits of growing a single leek to eat themselves, today’s allotment keepers enjoy growing simply for the sake of it, he said. Mr Don, the Daily Mail Weekend magazine’s gardening columnist, described the decision to sell off allotment plots after the war as a ‘social, horticultural and moral disaster’.

[Read more →]

July 9, 2017   Comments Off on UK gardening guru said Britain had seen a resurgence in interest in gardening, with allotments in particular enjoying a spectacular revival

UK: The onion war! Bitter allotment row sows division in Yorkshire town

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George Wilkinson has been evicted from his allotment because of the gardening row.

Spate of sabotage leads to secret meetings in sheds and even threats with a garden fork

By Tom Witherow
For The Daily Mail
1 July 2017

Excerpt:

The dispute dates back to August 2015 when the allotment shop, run by Yarm and District Gardeners Association (YDGA) since its inception in the 1970s, put up the price of onions to £2.80 per kilo.

The decision caused a rift between the YDGA’s chairman Bob Wegg and the secretary, who wanted to sell them at £2.20 a kilo.

Mr Wegg, 69, a retired engineer, was said to be furious that his secretary was undermining him.

[Read more →]

July 8, 2017   Comments Off on UK: The onion war! Bitter allotment row sows division in Yorkshire town

UK: Central London’s loveliest community garden has reopened

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The Garden was saved by a crowdfunding campaign that raised nearly £19,000

By Isabelle Aron
Time Out London
June 27 2017

Excerpt:

Finding somewhere to eat your lunch that isn’t your dingy office kitchen or a dirty bench on a busy road can be tricky in central London, so it’s welcome news that the Phoenix Garden has reopened after an 18-month renovation. Tucked away off Shaftesbury Avenue, this hidden leafy oasis is one of the original seven Covent Garden community gardens and was built on a car park in the 1980s – like that Joni Mitchell song, except the opposite.

[Read more →]

July 2, 2017   Comments Off on UK: Central London’s loveliest community garden has reopened

UK: Jeremy Corbyn’s devotion to his allotment is just what you want in a leader

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Tending the soil, producing, transforming – not to mention getting away from the stresses, strains and smartphones of everyday life – is a delightful thing to do.’ Photograph: Felicity Nook

As an allotment holder, I think the Labour leader is bang on: however important a job, you do it better with balance in your life – which blooms if you tend a plot

By Fay Schopen
The Guardian
June 2, 2017

Excerpt:

Corbyn’s allotment has been quite the media star during his tenure as Labour leader – it’s certainly not the first time he’s said he will hang on to it no matter what transpires politically – but both public and media interest in his north London plot have been mounting as the election campaign ramps up.

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July 1, 2017   Comments Off on UK: Jeremy Corbyn’s devotion to his allotment is just what you want in a leader

UK: From Forgotten London WWII Tunnels To Urban Farm: Q&A With Growing Underground

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Micro greens up close. Photo from Growing Underground.

We’re using food as something to break down barriers and engage in your local community, rather than just being a producer in the middle of nowhere

By Brittany Lane
Unreasonable
Jan 26, 2017

Excerpt:

When you discovered the tunnels, do you remember realizing the potential opportunity here? What did that feel like?

S: I remember the phone call to the guy at Transport for London when I said we want to meet and rent your tunnels. He was like, “You can’t do a nightclub.” We said we don’t want to; we want to build a farm. And I think at that point he was like, what? He literally came out a couple of days later and met us. They were really forward thinking and supportive.

[Read more →]

June 14, 2017   Comments Off on UK: From Forgotten London WWII Tunnels To Urban Farm: Q&A With Growing Underground

The trouble with temporary: Impacts and pitfalls of a meanwhile community garden in Wythenshawe, South Manchester

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The Macmillan community garden polytunnel.

This paper focuses on research conducted at a community garden in Wythenshawe, established by Real Food Wythenshawe as an example of a ‘meanwhile’ or temporary growing site for people affected by cancer.

By Rebecca St. Clair, Michael Hardman, Richard P. Armitage and Graeme Sherriff
Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems
Cambridge University Press
June 6, 2017

Abstract:

The rise of Urban Agriculture projects across the UK has led to a surge of interest in their efficacy and resulting social impacts. Real Food Wythenshawe is a Lottery-funded urban food project in the UK that aims to teach the population of Wythenshawe to grow their own food and to cook from scratch. The area, popularly referred to as ‘Europe’s largest council estate’, suffers from high levels of deprivation and has been described as a ‘food desert’ due to a perceived lack of access to fresh fruit and vegetables (Small World Consulting, 2013). In order to encourage Wythenshawe residents to grow their own food and to increase access to fresh fruit and vegetables, Real Food Wythenshawe aims to transform unused areas of land into growing spaces, such as allotments and community gardens.

[Read more →]

June 12, 2017   Comments Off on The trouble with temporary: Impacts and pitfalls of a meanwhile community garden in Wythenshawe, South Manchester

UK: The new urban farm in Plymouth that will teach children in a very different way to school

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The council wants to build this facility in the future.

Soon there will be cows, goats, rabbits and chickens all living in the middle of Plymouth on the edge of a housing
estate.

By Sarah Herald
Plymouth Herald
June 03, 2017

Excerpt:

Plans to create a community farm at Derriford Community Park have taken a step forwards after the council formally submitted plans to revamp a former dairy building.

The renovations of the old dairy at the farm will provide a space for schools and colleges to learn more about farm life and will also house a facility for keeping animals.

[Read more →]

June 10, 2017   Comments Off on UK: The new urban farm in Plymouth that will teach children in a very different way to school

Lord Heseltine addresses the potential of horticulture to benefit deprived communities

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Lord Heseltine.

“Step by step as urban living has created the huge conurbations, people have sought to use nature to humanise the built environment. I think this is a lesson with still much to teach us.

By Matthew Appleby
Horticulture Week
May 22, 2017
(Must read. Mike)

Excerpt:

“There are no simple answers to complex questions but gardening can play a part. Derelict land is all too present. Provide them with the tools to plant it. If they plant it they may feel a pride in what they did. They may wish to defend it, even extend it. The work requires little skill but it offers ladders. If a person starts by tidying the garden of an elderly pensioner, there is a short journey to a full time job with elderly folk willing to pay someone to do the same in nearby more prosperous suburbs.

[Read more →]

May 23, 2017   Comments Off on Lord Heseltine addresses the potential of horticulture to benefit deprived communities