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Category — Entrepreneurs

Urban farming plan earns woman statewide award in Rome, New York

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sunyChristina Carambia stands at her family garden in Hounsfield, NY, with the check she earned from SEFCU for her start-up business. She wants to build indoor gardens at the building.

Christina Carambia’s Underground Greens is a business plan that was chosen this spring for a Minority and Women-Owned Business Enterprise award in the statewide New York Business Plan Competition.

By Steve Jones
Rome Sentinel
July 9, 2016

Excerpt:

Working in her “vertical farm,” Christina envisions 40 Romans, each assigned to maintaining 1,000 square feet of vegetables.

“I’d like to be able to give jobs to local people like myself, to single moms like myself who can work from 9 in the morning after they drop off their kids at school until 3 in the afternoon,” Christina continues. “So many single moms and dads are coming up to me and telling me they want to be a part of this. Since many features of indoor farming can be automated – such as watering and temperature control — I can offer a flexible work schedule.”

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July 14, 2016   No Comments

The Grand ‘Beedapest’ Hotel – the world’s first luxury bee hotel

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(Must see video. Mike) The hotel itself is made from balsa wood and includes traditional hollow tubes in the bedrooms, which is a popular nesting choice for solitary bees. Other key features, such as sugar water baths and ultraviolet patterns, have been included based on scientific research that suggests that bees are attracted to these, and will therefore be enticed to enter the bee hotel to get some much needed rest and relaxation.

We’ve just created the world’s poshest insect residence: a luxury bee hotel, in partnership with Kew Gardens!

By Taylors Tea of Harrogate since 1886

Excerpts;

Our teas need bees

Without these buzzy little flavour creators, life would be very bland. Research has found that animal pollination makes the tastiest fruit, and many of the ingredients in our wonderfully distinctive fruit and herbal teas – created with the help of the plant experts at Kew Gardens – need bees simply to survive. or Click on the packs to see for yourself.

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July 13, 2016   No Comments

Restaurants in Singapore take to urban farming

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danl
Open Farm Community’s chef Daniele Sperindio in his element.

The harvest is only a fraction of the produce they require but chefs say it is worth the effort

By Annette Tan
Today Online
July 8, 2016

Excerpt:

Edible Garden City has gone on to help numerous other restaurants set up their own edible gardens. Last year, it started a 29,000sqf urban farm with Open Farm Community (OFC), a restaurant in the Dempsey area, in collaboration with chef-owner Ryan Clift and lifestyle company Spa Esprit Group.

The farm at OFC cultivates a mix of herbs, vegetables and fruit trees, including basil, red hibiscus, sweet potatoes, mustard greens, morning glory (kangkung), eggplant, papaya and okra (lady’s fingers). The produce is used in the restaurant’s seasonal menu that changes every four months.

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July 13, 2016   No Comments

Fence Gardening by Invivo Design Studio

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fencegWith our vertical vegetation products (A.K.A. “living walls” or “vertical gardens”), you can enjoy herbs, flowers, and vegetables within arm’s reach – even in downtown apartments and compact townhouses.

Vertical Urban Ecology – Invivo’s pocket planters allow you to turn any fence or railing into a vertical garden.

By Yael Stav and Gordon Glaze
Invivo Design Studio
Vancouver, BC

Excerpt from their website:

Invivo Design Studio was founded in Tel-Aviv by life partners Yael Stav and Gordon Glaze. Design research at the studio started by purchasing vertical vegetation systems from established vendors and assessing them for food production in our small Tel-Aviv Yard.

Invivo’s yard soon became a tourist attraction in it’s own right with weekly tours being conducted for sightseers regularly. It became a venue for instruction of vertical vegetation, permaculture and urban agriculture. The yard was inspiring in its methods and prolific in its yield.

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July 12, 2016   No Comments

Wonky Misfits tattoos – supporting imperfect/ugly fruits and vegetables movement

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tatoos

Temporary tattoos based on imperfect fresh product. The idea is to help build awareness of what real produce can look like and highlight the impacts our high cosmetic standards are having on the food industry.

By Ruby James-Strawhan
Wonky Misfits

Excerpt:

1. An estimated 20-40% of fresh produce is rejected before it hits the shelves because of how it looks.

2. We are wasting the resources that go into the production of fresh produce: Labour, Money, Time, Water, Energy and Love.

3. We are undercutting farmers, by selling imperfect produce at a cheaper price, even though they cost the same to create.

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July 8, 2016   Comments Off on Wonky Misfits tattoos – supporting imperfect/ugly fruits and vegetables movement

Fast-Food Chains Are Getting Into Farming Their Own Produce

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B.Good Got A Farm! And It’s On An Island!

B.Good, in Boston, is embarking on a new experiment in hyperlocal sourcing.

By Adele Peters
Fast Co-Exist
06.30.16

Excerpt:

They began growing kale in an unused alley next to a restaurant. In 2015, they started buying kale from an urban farmer using a hydroponic shipping container in Boston, and then began operating their own kale-filled shipping container under a local highway.

The island farm seemed like a natural next step. The island has an unusual history; for years, it served as the site of homeless shelters, and a farm next to the shelters helped feed residents and doubled as a job training program. But when the rickety bridge leading from Boston to the island was declared unsafe and demolished in 2014, the farm and shelters were abandoned.

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July 5, 2016   Comments Off on Fast-Food Chains Are Getting Into Farming Their Own Produce

Mobile farmer’s market rolls into west side Salt Lake City neighborhoods

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“We had samples of peas and raspberries. The kids were like eating it up and the kids were looking through all the produce that we had,” said Olschewski.

By Todd Tanner And Tamara Vaifanua
Fox 13 Salt Lake City
JUNE 27, 2016,

Excerpt:

The Urban Greens Market is now open for business. Salt Lake City leaders unveiled the new mobile farmer’s market at the Sorenson Unity Center – one of five spots on its weekly route.

“It really makes fresh produce walkable. People can walk over from the house, get fresh produce and then walk back,” said Shawn Peterson with the Green Urban Lunch Box.

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July 3, 2016   Comments Off on Mobile farmer’s market rolls into west side Salt Lake City neighborhoods

The Business Of Edible Landscaping in Florida

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frit
Photo by Daylina Miller/Wusf

There are 36 varieties of bananas at the nearly seven-acre farm, and so much more.

By Daylina Miller
WUSF Public Media
June 28, 2016

Excerpt:

Pete Kanaris founded GreenDreams, a landscaping company that helps clients grow their own food. He owns SandHills Farm, and it serves as both a nursery for plants and a testing ground for plants he recommends to clients.

“We’re really just learning to work with nature out here,” Kanaris said. “We have almost 750 fruit trees in the ground, almost 25 diff clumping varieties of bamboo… It’s a research site.”

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July 2, 2016   Comments Off on The Business Of Edible Landscaping in Florida

Vietnam’s Hoi An offers unique farming experience to eco-tourists

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watervA tourist waters vegetable beds in the Tra Que vegetable village, Hoi An City, with instructions from a local farmer. Photo: Tuoi Tre. Click on image for larger file.

Long known for its century-old ancient town and one-of-a-kind delicacies, Hoi An City in central Vietnam has been gaining popularity among green-fingered tourists with its eco-tours that guarantee full immersion in the agricultural lifestyle of rural Vietnam.

Tuoi Tre News
06/26/2016

Excerpt:

After a tour around Hoi An Ancient Town, a group of young tourists from the UK and Ukraine decided to hop on rented bicycles to explore the Tra Que vegetable village with their own eyes, ears, and hands.

Arriving at the village at 4:00 in the afternoon, the group paid for a homestay house situated only 300 meters from the vegetable fields to spend the night, determined to hit them at first light the next morning.

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June 29, 2016   Comments Off on Vietnam’s Hoi An offers unique farming experience to eco-tourists

Interview with Karl Linn: Community Gardens: Reclaiming a Commons

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One of his accomplishments was to convince the Berkeley planners to turn over a piece of land next to a BART tunnel for the establishment of a communal garden, where it still exists—The Carl Linn Peralta Community Garden.

By Richard Whittaker
Works and Conversations
Apr 29, 2001

Excerpt:

RW: In establishing a commons, would you say, that ideally part of what it would consist of would be a garden?

Karl Linn: Well in the past I saw an interesting development. I worked in about ten cities and established two non-profit corporations and inspired about eight others that were the first pioneering community design centers where volunteer professionals worked with economically disenfranchised neighborhoods helping them to build these common areas—architects, landscape architects, anthropologists, sociologists, lawyers, just name it. There was always some vegetation, but primarily we used recycled building materials, voluntary labor and tax delinquent land. From urban renewal demolition we used marble steps, bricks and flagstones.

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June 26, 2016   Comments Off on Interview with Karl Linn: Community Gardens: Reclaiming a Commons

Britain: Meet the city slickers who gave up everything to start a farm

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britfarmRosanna and Ian Horsley on their farm in Devon. Credit: Christopher Jones.

A growing number of people from outside the farming fraternity are buying up agricultural land in Britain and the properties that come with them. The amount of traditional farming families acquiring land and holdings has been depleting.

By Ben Pike
The Telegraph
21 June 2016

Excerpts:

There are three types of buyer entering the market. The investor (both private and corporate), who sees farmland as a commodity; those who escape to the countryside at the weekend and won’t tend the land themselves; and the new breed of ‘good lifer’, who has ditched the city day job and are ploughing all their funds and business acumen into running the farm themselves.

Residential buyers are also piling in, lured by the large farmhouses that often come with the land. “Some buy at £1?million and some at £20?million. They want to combine a lifestyle move with involvement in active farming,” says Lawson.

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June 26, 2016   Comments Off on Britain: Meet the city slickers who gave up everything to start a farm

New York’s public floating food forest raises $32,000

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In 2016 in New York City people will be able to visit a barge containing edible, perennial plants. We want to reinforce water as a commons, and work towards fresh food as a commons too.

By Adam Born
City Metric
June 14, 2016

Excerpt:

A leased barge, measuring in at 120 x 30 feet, will provide the foundation for a forest growing a range of produce. Whilst touring piers around New York state for six months, the forest will accommodate up to 300 people per day coming aboard, exploring and foraging for anything from herbs, berries and kale to kiwis.

The project is partly inspired by the growing urban agriculture movement found in New York City, now home to the largest rooftop farms in the world. From what was once a hobby for a few keen enthusiasts, this expansion has been supported by grassroots movements, volunteering and municipal programs.

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June 19, 2016   Comments Off on New York’s public floating food forest raises $32,000

Tasty Greens Neighbourhood Farms – New in Vancouver BC

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Microgreens: Sweet Corn, Wheatgrass, Daikon, Oriental Mustard, Curly Cress, Arugula, Fenugreek, Red Cabbage, Sunflower, Beet, Broccoli, Garlic Chives

By Samantha Dobo and Xche Balam

Tasty Greens headquarters is an East Vancouver character home on a popular bike path, which makes our 2 wheeled deliveries a breeze. We offer this punctual service by bicycle, because our aim is to be carbon neutral.

We recycle depleted soil, root mass and burlap via vermiculture and composting at our HQ. This creates nutrient dense soil to enrich future crops. Our Tasty Greens grow under ambient, led and florescent lights, in organic a medium and are grown from organic seed.

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June 17, 2016   Comments Off on Tasty Greens Neighbourhood Farms – New in Vancouver BC

Atlanta’s pop-up vineyard

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povinAtlanta’s pop-up vineyard, seen against the backdrop of the city’s midtown skyscrapers. Photo Credit: Cathy Huyghe

The vineyard is temporary – it will be relocated to a private residence within the city later this summer. The bottom line is that it’s an exceptional example of local, urban agriculture that’s also inspiring for the space and the connections it creates.

By Cathy Huyghe
Forbes
June 6, 2016

Excerpt:

In midtown Atlanta, on 14th Street, this small vineyard “grew” directly as a result of this festival, its place in the city, and the idea of what agriculture means food and wine enthusiasts. Coming across this vineyard on 14th Street would be like coming across a vineyard as you walk along Van Ness in San Francisco, or Sixth Avenue in New York, or Beacon Street in Boston: very much not what you’re expecting yet, when you get over the initial confusion, it also very much makes perfect sense.

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June 12, 2016   Comments Off on Atlanta’s pop-up vineyard

Fun, fashionable products for the urban agriculture enthusiast!

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flu1
See 18 photos of their new collection here.

Fluffy Layers offers exciting new designs and ideas for farmers everywhere.

Excerpt from Fluffy Layers website:

Company Bio: Fluffy Layers is an agriculture-fashion company headquartered in Silver Spring, Maryland. With the resurgence of raising chickens and urban farming, Fluffy Layers provides unique designs and an innovative approach to utilitarian clothing. Its signature Egg Collecting Apron® offers a fashionable, fun, and functional way for chicken owners and their families to collect eggs each day. The apron keeps one’s hands free and doesn’t require a heavy and cumbersome basket during collection time.

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June 10, 2016   Comments Off on Fun, fashionable products for the urban agriculture enthusiast!