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Category — Entrepreneurs

A Look Inside Colorado’s First And Only Edible Insect ‘Ranch’

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Crickets are just an ingredient in the empanadas — they’re not over selling it,” McGill said. “And Daniel Asher’s Kentucky Fried Crickets at River & Woods always sell out. He brines them for hours like you would fried chicken.”

By Alexandra Palmerton
303 Magazine
August 9, 2017

Excerpt:

RMMR is already growing quickly as word spreads. McGill spoke at Slow Food Nations, and this week she’s in New Mexico pitching to investors at New Mexico State University’s Ag Sprint Accelerator. She will also be on a panel at Denver’s Start-Up Week discussing Urban Agriculture with other farmers and chefs in the area.

Coming soon, RMMR is partnering with The Butterfly Pavillion to develop a co-branded line of snacks for its stores and other museum shops. The team is also organizing a bug dinner at Ophelia’s for the Entomology Society of America conference in November.

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August 17, 2017   No Comments

This solar powered weeding robot mimics robot vacuum cleaner

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Tertill whacks weeds using a spinning string trimmer, which cuts the weed off near the ground.

From their Kickstarter Website
Estimated delivery 2018

Excerpt:

How does it know what’s a weed and what’s a plant?

Tertill has a very simple method: weeds are short, plants are tall. A plant tall enough to touch the front of Tertill’s shell activates a sensor that makes the robot turn away. A plant short enough to pass under Tertill’s shell, though, activates a different sensor that turns on the weed cutter.

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July 24, 2017   Comments Off on This solar powered weeding robot mimics robot vacuum cleaner

Fresh cut flower farms spring up around Detroit

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Sarah Pappas started Fresh Cut Flower Farm on the edge of Woodbridge in 2013. Her flowers now decorate local shops.

“An acre of cut flowers will make more money than an acre of almost anything else,” said Dowling, naming corn, tomatoes and cucumbers as crops that have lower price tags.

By Stephanie Steinberg
Detroit News
July 14, 2017

Excerpt:

Sarah Pappas talks about the white snapdragons, purple-pink dianthuses or yellow rudbeckias that sprout on her flower farm and get bundled in bouquets like people in her life with strict needs and wants.

“They want it to be cool, dim and still. And they want you you to change the water and cut the stems at least once in a week,” said Pappas, sitting under a shaded tree at her Fresh Cut Flower Farm. The “they” she was referring to were vibrant bouquets for sale last week.

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July 21, 2017   Comments Off on Fresh cut flower farms spring up around Detroit

Gordon Ramsay launches a garden-themed pop up in London

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The Greenhouse is a private dining room for two.

Inside diners sit among pots of fresh herbs, below hanging baskets of strawberries, and alongside overflowing wheelbarrows of root vegetables.

Insider City Guides
Times of London
July 7, 2017

Excerpt:

Simply called The Allotment, the pop-up is on the top floor of Ramsay’s restaurant and hopes to encourage more people to grow their own produce. Entering from the ground floor bar, diners ascend two flights of stairs and arrive at the open plan dining area. At the far end of the room, by the sweeping bar and large television screen, is The Allotment.

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July 13, 2017   Comments Off on Gordon Ramsay launches a garden-themed pop up in London

French Students to Travel West Coast of North America by Bike to Discover Urban Agriculture

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2015 trip. L’agriculture urbaine a-t-elle les mêmes raisons d’être au Canada qu’aux USA? Phénomène de mode, manque de sécurité alimentaire, besoin d’un retour à la terre? Qu’est ce qui pousse les canadiens à manger leurs villes?

2018 Trip: We are beginning at San Diego and we finish at Vancouver.

By Audrey Michenaud-Rague
Second year student of AgroParisTech
Institute for Education and Research in Life Sciences, Agronomy, Food technology and Environment

Agrovelocity is an association led by three french students of AgroParisTech: Paris Institute of Technology for Life, Food and Environmental Sciences.

Their goal is to bike throw the West side of North America to investigate urban agriculture : from San Diego to Vancouver between april and august 2018.

The project has already been carried by two groups of boys; first, “Agrovelocités” in Europe (2014) and second “Agrovelocity” on the East side of North America (2015), but now girls start biking!

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July 12, 2017   Comments Off on French Students to Travel West Coast of North America by Bike to Discover Urban Agriculture

“When you used to say ‘farmer,’ you wouldn’t have me as the picture.”

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Chanowk Yisrael(Credit: Picasa)

Urban farming in Sacramento: Fighting back against the food desert one square-foot farming plot at a time, Chanowk Yisrael leads the way

By Aaron Carnes
Salon
July 2, 2017

Excerpt:

“Most gentrification efforts are led from the outside in. What we’re doing is we’re making change from the inside out. And people are seeing that. We’re transforming the ‘hood for good,” Yisrael tells me.

As we speak, he transfers young plants from the greenhouse to palettes outside so they can harden off before getting planted in the ground. Then he goes out to till the soil in one of his gardens (or as he calls it “dancing with the earth”), opting not for a rototiller, and instead using a broadfork. He jokes that interviewing a farmer is a “moving target.”

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July 9, 2017   Comments Off on “When you used to say ‘farmer,’ you wouldn’t have me as the picture.”

Farmers for hire turn backyards into vegetable patches

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This 2016 photo provided by The Organic Gardener shows a rooftop garden in Chicago, Ill. (The Organic Gardener via AP)

Urban farming services cater to both homes and businesses that want home-grown produce but not the work involved in growing it.

By Katherine Roth
Associated Press
Jun 28, 2017

Excerpt:

The Organic Gardener Ltd., the farmer-for-hire service she and her husband, Verd, started in the Chicago area in 2005, is one of many such services that have cropped up across the country. Some of these farmers have farming backgrounds, while others are landscapers who expanded their expertise, or entrepreneurs from a range of professional backgrounds who just love gardening and the outdoors.

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July 3, 2017   Comments Off on Farmers for hire turn backyards into vegetable patches

Jack Jack’s Coffee House the ‘catalyst’ for Urban Farming on Long Island, New York

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Both Jim and Rosette visited the church, where they agreed to take over 10,000 square feet of land and create their Lawn Island Farms.

By Nicholas Esposito
Greater Babylon
June 18, 2017

Excerpt:

Cassandra Trimarco, a physician assistant, who is a frequent customer at Jack Jack’s, was beyond excited to see the flier, being someone who was interested in growing her own food, but was restricted land-wise.

“I would grow little basil in cans, but that never worked out,” she said laughing.

After reading the ad she called immediately.

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June 23, 2017   Comments Off on Jack Jack’s Coffee House the ‘catalyst’ for Urban Farming on Long Island, New York

Homesteader to Restauranteur – San Diego’s The Red Door

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Watlington to transform her half acre back-yard garden into a vibrant urban farm that now supplies the restaurant with nearly 100 percent of its produce in the summer and 50 percent during the winter.

By Lisa Kivirist
Mother Earth News
June 14, 2017

Excerpt;

Are you a homesteader with a dream launching your own food business one day? Perhaps a restaurant showcasing farm to table fare? Trish Watlington, owner of The Red Door Restaurant, shares four of her success strategies that launched her from backyard gardener to San Diego’s leading local food entrepreneur. I’d also call her an “ecopreneur,” given her focus on the environment and making the world a better place.

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June 21, 2017   Comments Off on Homesteader to Restauranteur – San Diego’s The Red Door

One community garden at a time: how New Yorkers are fighting for food justice

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We didn’t call it food justice before – we called it survival.’ Photograph: Edward Helmore for the Guardian.

Tanya Fields’ Libertad Urban Farm joins a city-wide movement to redistribute resources to poor communities that are systemically deprived of healthy food

By Edward Helmore
The Guardian
12 June 2017

Excerpt:

For the past three summers, Tanya Fields produced a veritable cornucopia of fruits and vegetables at the Libertad Urban Farm in the South Bronx. But then disaster struck: “We got burglarized three times by a crackhead. He took everything. The pears, the grill – anything he thought had value. He knocked down the shed, destroyed the tomato vines and stole the eggplant.”

These difficulties are surely a setback, but they have not dulled Fields’ commitment to the issues of food justice and food equality, an emerging aim of community-focused activism across the US sometimes described as “communities exercising their right to grow, sell, and eat healthy food”.

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June 17, 2017   Comments Off on One community garden at a time: how New Yorkers are fighting for food justice

Florida: Fleet Farming launches in Jacksonville – Grow a garden in your yard without lifting a finger

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More than 55,000 households don’t have easy access to fresh food in Duval County.

By Letisha Bereola
Action News Jax
Apr 28, 2017

Excerpt:

Here’s how it works: A homeowner donates their lawn and some cash for startup costs. Then a group of volunteers tend to the garden—you don’t have to lift a finger. You keep a share of the crop—the rest goes to local farmer’s markets or restaurants.

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June 10, 2017   Comments Off on Florida: Fleet Farming launches in Jacksonville – Grow a garden in your yard without lifting a finger

Social Entrepreneurs Grow A ‘Computer Garden’ At Zahn Innovation Center

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City LABscape’s Jorge Burgos, Wei Zhang and Sabrina Cohn (Photo credit: Wildbloom Photography)

A “computer garden” for urban farming that grows food without soil or harmful chemicals.

By Anne Field
Forbes
May 30, 2017

Excerpt:

Recently, Logan and Babich grew their first crop–radishes, which took about eight days to pop. “They came out really well,” says Babich. Next step: Over the summer, they plan to develop their hardware platform. Plus, they’re working with a fellow Zahn startup City LABscape to build the hardware for that company. City LABscape, which recently won the Standard Chartered Women + Tech4NYC Prize, has developed a curriculum and prototype for hands-on indoor agriculture STEM education for middle and high school students, using small hydroponic-growing systems.

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June 5, 2017   Comments Off on Social Entrepreneurs Grow A ‘Computer Garden’ At Zahn Innovation Center

Canada: British Columbia Researcher Opens Her Dye Garden for Tour

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Each dye plant is tested to see if they can create rich long lasting colours when exposed to light or when washed multiple times.

By Esme Hedrick-Wong
June 4, 2017

On May 28th, 2017 Esme, founder of Esme Living Colour, opened her dye gardens and textile studio on Salt Spring Island for visitors. There are over seventy different dye plants and trees in her gardens, including seven different varieties of indigo plants. On display in the studio were silk and silk hemp naturally dyed textiles, shawls and wall hangings. Over 80 visitors came from as far as Europe and Japan. Esme conducted tours for visitors on a beautiful sunny afternoon; followed by a talk on different natural dye techniques that she uses in her work.

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June 4, 2017   Comments Off on Canada: British Columbia Researcher Opens Her Dye Garden for Tour

Controversial ‘Urban Homesteading’ Jules Dervaes (1947-2016)

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Jules Dervaes (1947 – December 2016) was an urban farmer and a proponent of the urban homesteading movement.

From Wikipedia:

Excerpt:

Self-sufficient in the city

Dervaes has a one-fifth acre lot in Pasadena, California,on which he and his family raise three tons of food per year. This provides 75 percent of their annual food needs, 99 percent of their produce and helps them sustain an organic produce business. They also raise ducks, chickens, goats, bees, compost worms and are running an aquaponics fish experiment.

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June 1, 2017   Comments Off on Controversial ‘Urban Homesteading’ Jules Dervaes (1947-2016)

An Urban Winery Creates Rhubarb Wine

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Rhubarb is a hearty crop that grows well in Maine. We get our rhubarb from Maine farms and use it to make tasty wines we are sure you will love.

By Kathleen Pierce
Urban Eye
May 17, 2017

Excerpts:

Rhubarb, it’s not just for pie.

Two Mainers say the crimson plant that grows prolifically in the spring makes the perfect elixir. In the former Rockingham Electric Supply Co. in Portland’s East Bayside, Pete Dubuc and Amanda O’Brien are making rhubarb wine in small batches using simple ingredients from Maine.

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May 23, 2017   Comments Off on An Urban Winery Creates Rhubarb Wine