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Category — Entrepreneurs

Antwerp, Belgium: ‘Caffungi’ urban farming – Turning coffee ground into oyster mushrooms

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(Be sure to turn on English subtitles. Use the gear icon at the bottom of the YouTube image.)

‘In Belgium, too, we have an excess of organic waste, such as, for example, the large amounts of coffee grounds from espresso and other coffee machines.

From their Kisskissbankbank site

Excerpt:

CAFFUNGI LOVE BALLS

When we produce bulk we often deal with overproduction. Because of that we went looking for a way to use these leftovers and avoid they end up thrown away. This is how the Caffungi Love Balls came to life. The balls are artisanally made with oyster mushrooms. We use chickpeas, beans and loads of fresh herbs such as coriander and parsley. We get these ingredients at local farms. All balls are hand rolled and don’t contain preservatives. Our Caffungi Love Balls are 100% natural, free, local and vegan.

[Read more →]

January 27, 2017   Comments Off on Antwerp, Belgium: ‘Caffungi’ urban farming – Turning coffee ground into oyster mushrooms

FarmedHere, a pioneer of the new wave of commercial urban farms in the Chicago area, is closing its 90,000-square-foot facility for good

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Jose Velazquez dumps apples in a pressing machine Jan. 13, 2017, at Here Holdings’ processing plant in Carol Stream. Its FarmedHere operation is ceasing growing operations to focus on making food products at the plant. (James C. Svehla / Chicago Tribune)

“There’s a lot of good that FarmedHere did for indoor farming and hopefully lessons learned will prove beneficial for businesses that come after,” Thomann said.

By Greg Trotter
Chicago Tribune
Jan 16, 2017

Excerpt:

Last year, FarmedHere arrived at a crossroads: Grow large enough to offset the considerable labor and energy costs — or instead focus the business on making branded products, Laurell said. Ultimately, the company decided return on investment looked significantly better by giving up the farm.

“The more I learned about the reality of farming, it led to a change of strategy,” Laurell said.

[Read more →]

January 23, 2017   Comments Off on FarmedHere, a pioneer of the new wave of commercial urban farms in the Chicago area, is closing its 90,000-square-foot facility for good

Many Urban Farmers Use Community Supported Agriculture (CSA)

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Portion of large infographic. See complete graphic here.

Infographic

By PartSelect
GHHERGICH&Co.
Oct 2016

Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) is a concept that gained traction in the US in the 1990s, and has grown exponentially in popularity in the last few years. The concept of a CSA is beneficial on many levels, both for farms and for consumers. In a nutshell, CSA works to offer shares to members of their communities for a (usually quite reasonable) set price. In return, the customer receives a box of fresh, seasonal produce at regular intervals, usually weekly or monthly.

This arrangement is beneficial to farmers who work in an industry where it is normal for fluctuations in their business to occur. It gives farmers a baseline of support throughout the year, and can help them with cash flow ahead of their usual harvest.

[Read more →]

January 20, 2017   Comments Off on Many Urban Farmers Use Community Supported Agriculture (CSA)

Botanium – Grow Edible Greens

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Even here in Sweden it’s easy, and you don’t need a special “growing light”. Just put your plant under a standard CFL, fluorescent lamp or LED.

By Rasmus Tretow
Co-founder
Botanic

From Kickstarter:

Botanium is a compact, easy and effortless way of growing. Its a hydroponic pot, which means it grows plants like chilies, herbs and tomatoes without soil. It waters the plants automatically. The result? Faster growth and no need to worry about over or under watering. Leave it for a month and get back to a healthy plant.

[Read more →]

January 18, 2017   Comments Off on Botanium – Grow Edible Greens

Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg Spent Martin Luther King Day Building a Community Garden in Oak Cliff, Texas

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Mark Zuckerberg: “Today I helped plant a garden with members of the Oak Cliff community in Dallas as part of their Day of Service honoring Martin Luther King Jr. Oak Cliff is a food desert, so the garden we worked on is going to be a source of fresh fruits and vegetables for the community.”

By Beth Rankin
Dallas Observer
Jan 16, 2017

Excerpt:

Zuckerberg spent the afternoon with the Commit Partnership, an organization that “helps drive student achievement throughout Dallas County from cradle to career by leveraging data and collaboration to measure what matters, identify effective practices and align community resources to spread what works.” Together with For Oak Cliff, an organization that seeks to provide education and opportunities for kids, Zuckerberg and Commit cleared the vacant lot to make room for a community garden.

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January 18, 2017   Comments Off on Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg Spent Martin Luther King Day Building a Community Garden in Oak Cliff, Texas

Dublin farmer and the tubers for Mars

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Andrew Douglas, shown with Jayden Whelan, left, and Malena Behan, hopes his potatoes will feed explorers like in The Martian. Photo by Andres Poveda.

Andrew Douglas, a horticulturist who set up Dublin’s first rooftop farm, plans to supply potato pods to a Nasa mission on the slopes of a Hawaiian volcano, where the space agency is simulating life on Mars.

By Gabrielle Monaghan
The Sunday Times Ireland
January 15 2017
(Must see. Mike)

Excerpt:

A version of the Irish potato will boldly go where no spud has gone before — to a Mars simulation habitat run by Nasa.

Andrew Douglas, a horticulturist who set up Dublin’s first rooftop farm, plans to supply potato pods to a Nasa mission on the slopes of a Hawaiian volcano, where the space agency is simulating life on Mars. Nasa is hoping to send humans to the red planet by the 2030s.

In 2013, Douglas set up a kitchen garden on the roof of the Chocolate Factory building in Dublin before moving it to the top-floor science lab at Belvedere­ College. There are now 180 varieties of heritage and heirloom potatoes growing in upcycled water cooler bottles and artificial grass offcuts on the college’s rooftop. “Who better to help experiment with growing spuds on Mars than an Irishman?” said Douglas.

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January 15, 2017   Comments Off on Dublin farmer and the tubers for Mars

Urban Farmers Make Forbes’ – 30 under 30: Social Entrepreneurs

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Cofounders, Up Top Acres.

Across Washington D.C., Up Top Acres operates four rooftop farms totaling 1 acre in farmland. Growing a variety of produce, they sell their harvest to neighbors of the buildings they grow on and nearby restaurants. They’ve since harvested 60,000 pounds of food.

Forbes Magazine
2017

Excerpt from The University of Vermont:

If you’re looking for farmland in Metro Washington, D.C., try looking up. Way up.

In the nation’s capitol, Up Top Acres is transforming rooftops that would otherwise go unused into thriving organic farms. That work has landed Kristof Grina ’12, a Plant and Soil Science graduate in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, a coveted spot as one of Forbes’ 30 Under 30 Social Entrepreneurs of 2017. Grina is featured on the list with Up Top Acres co-founders Kathleen O’Keefe and Jeff Prost-Greene.

[Read more →]

January 11, 2017   Comments Off on Urban Farmers Make Forbes’ – 30 under 30: Social Entrepreneurs

Social Enterprise at Dig Deep Farms in Oakland, California

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Damien Cipio (left) and Pac Rucker tend the crops at East Bay enterprise Dig Deep Farms, which is partly funded by the Alameda County Sheriff’s Office.

There are almost too many food-justice programs to name. They include urban farming nonprofits such as Acta Non Verba, Phat Beets and City Slicker Farms, as well as social enterprises like Youth UpRising’s Corners Cafe and a startup called Town Kitchen, which trains young people from low-income communities and delivers box lunches to offices and conferences.

By Jonathan Kauffman
San Francisco Chronicle
December 27, 2016

Excerpt:

News of a Bay Area chef with a farm barely raises an eyebrow these days. But when Sarah Kirnon became the social-enterprise director of Dig Deep Farms four months ago, she wasn’t out to cultivate premium ingredients for her Oakland restaurant, Miss Ollie’s. She had a bigger mission in mind.

The 6-year-old farm, which has 8 acres in the hills above San Leandro, isn’t just a source for organic radishes, greens and carrots. It is funded in part by the Alameda County Sheriff’s Office, and many of the farmers who tend its citrus trees and lush fields were once incarcerated.

[Read more →]

January 4, 2017   Comments Off on Social Enterprise at Dig Deep Farms in Oakland, California

CityFarm Malaysia ventures into indoor farming to inspire more urbanites to grow their own food

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(from left) Chew, Koay and Loo showing the City Window farm hydroponic starter pack. Pix by Owee Ah Chun

“I AM a city farmer,” read the words in black and striking green on the black T-shirt worn by the youth who greets me at the door of the second-floor office in Sri Kembangan, Selangor.

By Zuliantie Dzul
New Straits Times
17 December 2016

Excerpt:

The self-taught trio and two others behind the set-up are graduates of the Multimedia University in Cyberjaya. It was through clubs and student activities that they met as they were all on different programmes.

“It all started as a hobby about two years ago,” shares 28-year-old Chew, who’s a freelance software engineer. “I saw this urban farming concept on TV. It’s big in the US and Europe, and I was interested. So I bought a plant and put it in a small corner in Malaysian Global Innovation & Creativity Centre, where he worked. Soon after that, Koay decided to join as well.”

Discussions followed soon after and eventually, the idea became a reality and CityFarm Malaysia was born.

[Read more →]

December 26, 2016   Comments Off on CityFarm Malaysia ventures into indoor farming to inspire more urbanites to grow their own food

Singapore: Urban Farm’s Revenue is Expected to Hit More Than $1 Million in 2017

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See video here.

Okinawa Spinach: It’s something that can be substituted for other vegetables that are bought in the store.

By Sarah Toms and Aimran Supardi
BBC
Dec 8, 2016

Excerpt:

Singapore is a small, metropolitan island that imports more than 90% of its fruit and vegetables. Spare land is scarce, but urban farming – on rooftops, footpaths and vacant lots – is slowly taking root.

That’s because Bjorn Low, the co-founder of a business called Edible Garden City, has been sowing the seeds of change over the last four years by championing local produce that’s still being grown in places by older plot farmers.

[Read more →]

December 16, 2016   Comments Off on Singapore: Urban Farm’s Revenue is Expected to Hit More Than $1 Million in 2017

Paris startup plans to grow produce in shipping containers

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agrc

Fruits and vegetables in Europe travel, on average, 1500 km before reaching your table. They’re harvested too soon and they are expected to ripen during the transportation process.

Agricool
Press Release
Nov 23, 2016

Excerpt:

Agricool is a startup created in 2015 by Gonzague Gru and Guillaume Fourdinier, two sons of farmers who couldn’t find any high-quality fruits and vegetables in the city. The problem was obvious: fruits and vegetables sold in cities don’t have any taste and they’re full of pesticides. The reason was obvious, too: fruits and vegetables in Europe travel, on average, 1500 km before reaching your table. They’re harvested too soon and they are expected to ripen during the transportation process. What’s worse, they’re selected precisely for their ability to travel instead of for their taste. And why do they come from so far away? Because space is rare: in France, 25 square meters of agricultural land disappears each second. So if we want to eat high-quality fruits and vegetables, we need to find a way to grow them in cities.

[Read more →]

December 12, 2016   Comments Off on Paris startup plans to grow produce in shipping containers

Nigeria: Angel Adelaja, my life as a city farmer

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ajnig
Angel Oluwayimika Adelaja is the CEO of Fresh Direct Nigeria, a city farming initiative using stackable containers.

We hope to be able to onboard 10,000 youth in areas that cut across agriculture and urban farming, distribution, sales/marketing, ag-tech and automation and much more.

By Yetunde Oladeindeon
The Nation
December 04, 2016

Excerpt:

Fresh Direct Nigeria is city farming using stackable container farms! We bring fresh premium organic produce closer to market with our Container Farm Technology. Using hydroponics and vertical farming within a shipping container, our Container Farms are able to grow directly in urban areas. This means that production is brought closer to market or at market with ease.

[Read more →]

December 10, 2016   Comments Off on Nigeria: Angel Adelaja, my life as a city farmer

Urbanfarmerz ECommerce for Backyard Farmers

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ecom

URBANFARMERZ is a Canadian social enterprise with global ambitions whose mission is to empower backyard farmers and urban growers around the world to GROW – FEED – SHARE of their bounty through our mobile eCommerce marketplace.

Indiegogo
Dec 2, 2016

Excerpt:

While municipalities have begun to actively promote urban agriculture, millions of current & aspiring backyard farmers have limited access to tools to help commercialize local market opportunities.

Our solution to these problems is The URBANFARMERZ eCommerce Marketplace, an Urban-Agro Community platform bringing buyers & sellers together for the fair, direct exchange of fresh local produce while disrupting traditional supply chain models.

The platform consists of (2) key components;

[Read more →]

December 8, 2016   Comments Off on Urbanfarmerz ECommerce for Backyard Farmers

‘Munch’ project enlivens city street life in Coquitlam, BC

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coq
Erin Davidson of the Austin Heights Business Improvement Association and Peter Meegan of Mary Ann Meegan Insurance Ltd. with one of 38 planters filled with edible produce and herbs that was installed earlier this year for Coquitlam Munch, a city of Coquitlam Community in Bloom project.

38 self-watering planters, created by a garden designer Rachel Elves, are planted with food by the adopting businesses.

By Diane Strandberg
Tri City News
June 23, 2016

Excerpt:

“I thought it was a good community thing,” said Meegan, who had to plant the herbs and veggies as part of the planter “adoption” process, and was surprised at how fun it was.

“It’s in the blood,” he joked, noting that members of his Irish family are good gardeners.

[Read more →]

November 30, 2016   Comments Off on ‘Munch’ project enlivens city street life in Coquitlam, BC

Speedibin: Metal Compost Bin That Keeps Rodents Out

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speed Joyce McMenamon, second generation developer of the Speedibin.

Indiegogo Campaign – Speedibins were first designed by Fred and Peg Francis in 1989

By Joyce McMenamon
Courtenay BC, Canada
Nov. 2016

It is all metal so animals can’t chew through.

A metal mesh screen on the bottom allows worms, microbes and water to transfer but prevents animals from tunneling in.

The large lid comes right off for easy access.

The front door slides out for easy removal of finished compost.

A latching handle keeps out raccoons, dogs and wind.

[Read more →]

November 26, 2016   Comments Off on Speedibin: Metal Compost Bin That Keeps Rodents Out