New Stories From 'Urban Agriculture Notes'
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Category — Entrepreneurs

Young Dairy Farmers from Rajasthan’s Kota City sell Cow Dung Cakes online on Amazon

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“People basically want it for religious purposes in these cities,” Singh added.

NewsGram Desk
May 8, 2017

Excerpt:

The product is packaged in such a way that the cakes don’t break.

For starters, the dung, which is a semi-liquid mixture, is first dried. It is then put into a circular die which goes through a heat-shrinking process. The finished product is then packed in cardboard boxes and dispatched.

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May 14, 2017   Comments Off on Young Dairy Farmers from Rajasthan’s Kota City sell Cow Dung Cakes online on Amazon

The New Farm: Our Ten Years on the Front Lines of the Good Food Revolution

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Just released: The inspiring story of a family that quit the rat race and left the city to live out their ideals on an organic farm

By Brent Preston
Penguin Random House Canada
May 2017

It’s true that Brent Preston and Gillian Flies did leave the city and move to the country, and they did make a lot of stupid mistakes, some of which are pretty funny in hindsight. But their goal from the beginning was to build a real farm, one that would sustain their family, heal their environment, and nourish their community. It was a goal that was achieved not through bucolic self-reflection, but through a decade of grinding toil and perseverance.

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May 5, 2017   Comments Off on The New Farm: Our Ten Years on the Front Lines of the Good Food Revolution

10 Urban Farmers Bringing Fresh Food to New York City

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Iyeshima Harris.

Favorite thing about farming in NYC: “Having to educate adults and my peers about the importance of food justice.

By Katherine Ripley
NYC Food Policy Centre
Apr 26, 2017

Excerpt:

Iyeshima Harris is a farm manager for Ecostation New York and an organizer for the Youth Food Justice Network. She is currently transitioning from being an urban farmer to being a political organizer advocating for food justice. Iyeshima believes that urban farming is just one component of food justice, and she wants youth in the city to understand why people fight for food. Iyeshima also wants youth in the city to experience what she experienced growing up in Jamaica, where her great grandmother had a garden, and her family did not need to go to the supermarket for anything.

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May 3, 2017   Comments Off on 10 Urban Farmers Bringing Fresh Food to New York City

City Farmer Gets New “.eco” Domain Name

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City Farmer’s new website [www.cityfarmer.eco] features our Compost Demonstration Garden and our coming 40th anniversary next year. Visit the site here.

Leading global brands like Tesla, Google and LG have bought .eco domain names, taken the .eco pledge and set up .eco profiles.

Press Release
Dot ECO
April 25, 2017

Excerpt:

VANCOUVER, BC – Starting today, businesses, organizations and individuals can own a .eco domain, the new dedicated environmental domain extension for people and brands committed to positive change for the planet. The .eco domain comes to market following a nine-year collaborative effort among more than 50 environmental non-profits, all with a shared vision to bring a trusted symbol of environmental responsibility to the Internet.

“Consumers will recognize .eco as the new global identity for brands and organizations committed to positive environmental change,” said Trevor Bowden, co-founder of .eco and Big Room Inc., a certified B Corporation located in Vancouver, BC. “Early .eco domain holders have already inspired a positive ripple effect, encouraging other brands to register and promoting transparency and a new level of accountability in how companies broadcast their social, environmental and CSR mandates.”

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April 26, 2017   Comments Off on City Farmer Gets New “.eco” Domain Name

GROWKIT – The Urban Agriculture Kit for Beginners

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A Growbag (equipment + potting soil), a Growpack (plug plants + organic fertilizer) and a Growguide (a set of audio classes).

From their Indiegogo site
2017

Excerpt:

Noocity Urban Ecology is a start-up based in Oporto (Portugal) focused on the facilitation of Urban Agriculture. The name Noocity comes from mixing the prefix NOO, representing collective consciousness (based on the noosphere concept), with the word CITY, representing the urban universe.

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April 25, 2017   Comments Off on GROWKIT – The Urban Agriculture Kit for Beginners

Is Boston the next urban farming paradise?

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Freight Farms has spread north from Boston to Canada, and Pope says there are over just over 100 of the company’s container farms operating in the US alone.

By Oset Babur
The Guardian
Apr 16, 2017

Excerpt:

Freight Farms has spread north from Boston to Canada, and Pope says there are over just over 100 of the company’s container farms operating in the US alone. The company outfits each 40-ft container with the equipment for the entire farming cycle, from germination to harvest. This set of equipment, which the company calls Leafy Green Machine (LGM), creates a hydroponic system, a soil-free growing method that uses recirculated water with higher nutrient levels to help plants grow.

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April 24, 2017   Comments Off on Is Boston the next urban farming paradise?

India: Startups That Want You to Grow Your Own Food

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“We have an estimated 16,000 square kilometres of unused rooftop space in India. If we can turn 10 percent into farms, there’s a big opportunity.”

By Pranay Parab
Gadgets 360
10 April 2017

Excerpt:

he biggest challenge for terrace and balcony gardens is seepage. Over time, water stagnation tends to weaken building structures and by the time this visible through signs such as dripping ceilings, the damage is already done. Khetify says its “khet” (farm) boxes use drip irrigation to avoid this problem. Similarly, the other startups also say they take precautions to ensure that water doesn’t stagnate on roofs or balconies.

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April 18, 2017   Comments Off on India: Startups That Want You to Grow Your Own Food

From Moscow: A ‘City Farm’ home appliance

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The city farms are equipped with fine sensors sending all the farm performance and plant growth indicators to the application.

Fibonacci
Krasny Oktyabr, 119072 Moscow

From their website:

The body is completely leak-tight, made of sound eight-layered composite aluminum. You can select out of 9 coloring options.

Regulated «smart» tinting coating of a farm’s glass door enables to turn down the glaring light RainbowSpectrum ™. Tinting coating is controlled with the use of the INTELLIGENT EXPERT application.

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April 16, 2017   Comments Off on From Moscow: A ‘City Farm’ home appliance

An Innovative Micro Farm at Restaurant in Brooklyn

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Olmsted restaurant mini-farm. Click on image for larger file.

A pair of quails, mascots of sorts for Olmsted, watch over the garden and provide eggs.

By Annie Quigley
Gardenista
September 15, 2016
(Must see. Mike)

Excerpt:

A buzzy new restaurant in Brooklyn is condensing today’s biggest food trends (farm-to-table, sustainability, no-waste) into a tiny backyard garden. At Olmsted, named for the famous landscape architect who designed nearby Prospect Park, chef Greg Baxtrom (formerly at Per Se and Blue Hill at Stone Barns) and farmer Ian Rothman (the former horticulturist at New York’s Atera restaurant) have cultivated a self-sustaining micro-farm—complete with an aquaponics system in a clawfoot bathtub. Plus: The space transforms into an oasis in which to sip garden-fresh cocktails, every dish on the menu is under $24, and a donation is made to nonprofit GrowNYC for every meal eaten. Here, a look inside this clever kitchen garden.

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April 14, 2017   Comments Off on An Innovative Micro Farm at Restaurant in Brooklyn

US graham cracker brand, Annie’s, has donated $100,000 to urban farmland project Gangsta Gardener in Los Angeles, California.

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Ron Finley has many titles: Fashion Designer, The Renegade Gardener, Guerilla Gardener, Gangsta Gardener, Head Trouble Maker but most importantly Revolutionary.

By Douglas Yu
Bakery and Snacks
Apr 6, 2017

Excerpt:

However, he is now facing eviction by city officials unless he can come up with $500,000 to purchase the property. Through his GoFundMe campaign, he has raised $485,000.

Annie’s president John Foraker told BakeryandSnack the company will “spread awareness and make noise” until the required funds are raised.

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April 10, 2017   Comments Off on US graham cracker brand, Annie’s, has donated $100,000 to urban farmland project Gangsta Gardener in Los Angeles, California.

Cleveland man went from crime to award-winning wine – an urban farming success story

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Mansfield Frazier proudly displays a 2014 bottle of his Traminette Vigonier, which came in second place at the Geauga County Fair. (Photo credit: Margaret Puskas)

The 73-year old took a vacant plot of land and turned it into an award-winning vineyard in the least likely of places—Hough, a predominately black community in desperate need in Cleveland’s inner city.

Vindy.com
Apr 1, 2017

Excerpt:

How Frazier wound up growing grapes seems just as unlikely as his vineyard. He had been in and out of prison multiple times – all for the same crime.

“I was a professional [credit card] counterfeiter and served five terms,” he said. He later settled down, married and became a community activist, writer and host of a radio program.

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April 9, 2017   Comments Off on Cleveland man went from crime to award-winning wine – an urban farming success story

‘Cityblooms’ Founder Nick Halmos Wins Innovator of the Year Award

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Innovator uses technology to build urban micro-farms

By Aleese Kopf
Palm Beach Daily News
Mar 27, 2017
(Must see. Mike)

Excerpt:

What was your first Cityblooms success story?

It must have been my proximity to major technology and agricultural centers (i.e. Silicon Valley and Salinas), but by 2011, I once again found myself keenly interested in the technology of growing food. I spun the Cityblooms effort back up inside a barn where we built almost 50 prototypes and filed four patents before we drew the attention of one of the large technology companies in the Bay Area (Plantronics) that was interested in hosting an installation to grow fresh produce for its campus eatery. This gave us the incredible opportunity to put some of our ideas into action and make a big push forward with our technology.

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April 2, 2017   Comments Off on ‘Cityblooms’ Founder Nick Halmos Wins Innovator of the Year Award

A Q&A With The Urban Farmers Behind Farm LA

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Arlan J. Wood and Emily Gleicher, with their dogs Buck Rogers and Ham Hock, at home in Frogtown. Photos by Jenna Chandler.

On their obsession with lima beans and their plans to plant gardens on abandoned properties

By Jenna Chandler
Curbed Los Angeles
Mar 24, 2017

Excerpt:

Every piece of Emily Gleicher and Arlan J. Wood’s yard in Frogtown is used for gardening. The couple grows a myriad of produce, from white sage to sunflowers to strawberry corn to dragon fruit to the most detested vegetable of childhood: lima beans.

The bounty supplements their diet. They make popcorn, salads, citronella oil, and hot sauce, which Wood has named “Caliente Culo.” But it’s the lima beans that help support Farm LA, the nonprofit they founded in May 2015 to turn abandoned and derelict lots into urban gardens for neighbors to enjoy. They sell the legumes in mason jars at farmers markets along with recipes for mashed lima beans and lima bean hummus.

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April 1, 2017   Comments Off on A Q&A With The Urban Farmers Behind Farm LA

Florida: Urban farming takes root in New Port Richey front yards

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Click on image for larger file.

“That’s Broccoli George’s. He started his in 2010,”

Laura Reiley
Tampa Bay Times
Mar 23, 2017
(Must see. Mike)

Excerpt:

At 5705 Virginia: “This one has only been here a year. It’s my ex-wife’s house,” he said. When he leaves in May, he plants a cover crop of black-eyed peas and sweet potatoes, and “when I come home in October, sometimes I come back to 2,000 pounds of sweet potatoes.”

In broad daylight and right in the front yard, something is happening in New Port Richey. The New Urbanism movement has taken hold and urban agriculture is flourishing.

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March 29, 2017   Comments Off on Florida: Urban farming takes root in New Port Richey front yards

Fortune: Kimbal Musk on ‘How Millennials Will Forever Change America’s Farmlands’

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Kimbal Musk is the co-founder of The Kitchen, a family of companies that pursue an America where everyone has access to real food. He sits on the boards of Tesla, SpaceX and Chipotle Mexican Grill.

By Kimbal Musk
Fortune
Mar 21, 2017

Excerpt:

Tiny plots on rooftops and small backyards are popping up all across America, particularly in urban areas that have never been associated with food production. These micro-farms aren’t meant to earn a profit or feed vast numbers of people, but they reflect the Millennial generation’s desire to forge a direct connection with the food they consume.

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March 26, 2017   Comments Off on Fortune: Kimbal Musk on ‘How Millennials Will Forever Change America’s Farmlands’