New Stories From 'Urban Agriculture Notes'
Random header image... Refresh for more!

Category — Environment

Louisiana tribes restore traditional diets in the face of climate change

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+


Photography by Edmund D. Fountain.

Native Americans are losing their ability to live off the land as it has crumbled into the Gulf of Mexico. Some of them are trying to figure out how to survive on what’s left.

By Barry Yeoman
Food and Environmental Network
Southern Foodways Alliance’s Gravy podcast, The Lens
February 9, 2017

Excerpts:

A few decades ago, the Pointe-au-Chien tribal members of Louisiana fed themselves well—they fished in nearby waters, raised livestock, planted fruits and vegetables, trapped marsh hens, and even hunted turtle and alligator. But as the tides, driven higher by climate change, started to eat up the tribe’s territory leaving fewer places to put a garden or raise livestock and less terrain to hunt and forage for wild plants, the tribe turned to processed foods. And as water levels continued to rise, so did rates of diabetes and cholesterol.

[Read more →]

February 15, 2017   No Comments

Martha Stewart: A Winter Harvest from My Vegetable Greenhouse

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+


Here’s Ryan harvesting some cutting celery, another ingredient of my green juice. This hardy annual can be used in place of celery and is easier to grow. The fine green leaves and thin hollow stems are especially good to flavor soups and stews.

Photos from her food producing greenhouse

Martha Up Close and Personal Blog
Feb 7, 2017

Excerpt:

My expansive outdoor vegetable garden is bare, but I’m fortunate to have lots of wonderful vegetables growing in the ground in a special greenhouse located behind my Equipment Barn. As many of you know, its design was inspired by Eliot Coleman, an expert of four-season farming.

[Read more →]

February 14, 2017   No Comments

Flooding impacts urban agriculture in Zimbabwe

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

Some urban farmers who spoke to ZwNews have expressed their fears that the floods being experienced in the country at the moment could lead to serious food insecurity.

By Lovemore Lubinda
ZWNews
Jan 20, 2017

Excerpt:

Kudakwashe Tagara, another Harare resident who last season had to send some of his urban farming produces to his parents in the rural areas (Mutoko) after they failed to harvest more to eat, said the floods have affected their livelihoods to a greater extent.

“The situation is compromising our ability to fend for our families; all my small fields dotted along the Mukuwisi River have been rendered a complete write-off. I won’t get anything this year, my aging parents in Mutoko depend on what I provide them,” he said.

[Read more →]

January 31, 2017   Comments Off on Flooding impacts urban agriculture in Zimbabwe

Towards Regenerated and Productive Vacant Areas through Urban Horticulture: Lessons from Bologna, Italy

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

Pictures of urban horticulture projects in Bologna.

Six case studies representing this variety of vacant areas were identified and evaluated

By Daniela Gasperi, Giuseppina Pennisi, Niccolò Rizzati, Francesca Magrefi, Giovanni Bazzocchi, Umberto Mezzacapo, Monique Centrone Stefani, Esther Sanyé-Mengual, Francesco Orsini, and Giorgio Gianquinto
Sustainability Journal
December 2016

Abstract:

In recent years, urban agriculture has been asserting its relevance as part of a vibrant and diverse food system due to its small scale, its focus on nutrition, its contribution to food security, its employment opportunities, and its role in community building and social mobility. Urban agriculture may also be a tool to re-appropriate a range of abandoned or unused irregular spaces within the city, including flowerbeds, roundabouts, terraces, balconies and rooftops. Consistently, all spaces that present a lack of identity may be converted to urban agriculture areas and, more specifically, to urban horticulture as a way to strengthen resilience and sustainability.

[Read more →]

January 19, 2017   Comments Off on Towards Regenerated and Productive Vacant Areas through Urban Horticulture: Lessons from Bologna, Italy

Dublin farmer and the tubers for Mars

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+


Andrew Douglas, shown with Jayden Whelan, left, and Malena Behan, hopes his potatoes will feed explorers like in The Martian. Photo by Andres Poveda.

Andrew Douglas, a horticulturist who set up Dublin’s first rooftop farm, plans to supply potato pods to a Nasa mission on the slopes of a Hawaiian volcano, where the space agency is simulating life on Mars.

By Gabrielle Monaghan
The Sunday Times Ireland
January 15 2017
(Must see. Mike)

Excerpt:

A version of the Irish potato will boldly go where no spud has gone before — to a Mars simulation habitat run by Nasa.

Andrew Douglas, a horticulturist who set up Dublin’s first rooftop farm, plans to supply potato pods to a Nasa mission on the slopes of a Hawaiian volcano, where the space agency is simulating life on Mars. Nasa is hoping to send humans to the red planet by the 2030s.

In 2013, Douglas set up a kitchen garden on the roof of the Chocolate Factory building in Dublin before moving it to the top-floor science lab at Belvedere­ College. There are now 180 varieties of heritage and heirloom potatoes growing in upcycled water cooler bottles and artificial grass offcuts on the college’s rooftop. “Who better to help experiment with growing spuds on Mars than an Irishman?” said Douglas.

[Read more →]

January 15, 2017   Comments Off on Dublin farmer and the tubers for Mars

Social Enterprise at Dig Deep Farms in Oakland, California

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+


Damien Cipio (left) and Pac Rucker tend the crops at East Bay enterprise Dig Deep Farms, which is partly funded by the Alameda County Sheriff’s Office.

There are almost too many food-justice programs to name. They include urban farming nonprofits such as Acta Non Verba, Phat Beets and City Slicker Farms, as well as social enterprises like Youth UpRising’s Corners Cafe and a startup called Town Kitchen, which trains young people from low-income communities and delivers box lunches to offices and conferences.

By Jonathan Kauffman
San Francisco Chronicle
December 27, 2016

Excerpt:

News of a Bay Area chef with a farm barely raises an eyebrow these days. But when Sarah Kirnon became the social-enterprise director of Dig Deep Farms four months ago, she wasn’t out to cultivate premium ingredients for her Oakland restaurant, Miss Ollie’s. She had a bigger mission in mind.

The 6-year-old farm, which has 8 acres in the hills above San Leandro, isn’t just a source for organic radishes, greens and carrots. It is funded in part by the Alameda County Sheriff’s Office, and many of the farmers who tend its citrus trees and lush fields were once incarcerated.

[Read more →]

January 4, 2017   Comments Off on Social Enterprise at Dig Deep Farms in Oakland, California

Could 3D printing technology be used as a solution to global food crises?

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+


Top 5 3D Food Printers.

“Considering that one third of food produced worldwide for human consumption (a staggering 1.3 billion tonnes) is thrown away each year, 3D food printing which involves the deposition of materials only where needed and on demand, could also contribute to curbing food wastage, while bringing high-tech, substantial meals to more people,”

From The Asian Food Journal
and 3D Printing.com

Excerpt:

3D food printing is essentially about using food ingredients and shaping them into a form. The configuration is set with the help of the printer’s 3D modeling program. The process, also known as additive manufacturing, involves the repeated layering of viscous ingredients as varied as vegetables and meat, to cheeses and dough, to eventually form solid comestibles, all based on information fed into the 3D printer from an SD card or computer. Today’s 3D printed edibles defy common perceptions of being merely aesthetic creations – they increasingly offer novel solutions to pertinent food concerns.

[Read more →]

December 11, 2016   Comments Off on Could 3D printing technology be used as a solution to global food crises?

$440K grant awarded to UC Santa Cruz for sustainable urban agriculture practices research

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

stcp
Dr. Stacy Philpott showed off insect samples.

“Urban agriculture is increasingly important in supplying food for urban residents yet we lack scientific and management information about how to enhance pest control, pollination and water conservation in urban gardens in order to improve food access,” said Philpott.

By James Herrera
Monterey Herald
11/30/16

Excerpt:

“Not only is the Central Coast a leading producer of fresh produce for tables across the nation and abroad, we’re also leaders in agriculture research,” said Farr in a press release. “During my 40-plus years in elected office, I’ve been a champion for increasing access to fresh fruits and vegetables and for improving sustainable agriculture practices.”

Across the nation, populations in many urban areas is growing but many residents lack access to fresh fruits and vegetables. As a result, an increasing number of these residents are growing produce in urban gardens. This research will provide information to improve sustainable practices for urban agriculture including pest control, pollination and water storage.

[Read more →]

December 6, 2016   Comments Off on $440K grant awarded to UC Santa Cruz for sustainable urban agriculture practices research

Why Two California Indian Tribes are Growing Their Own Food, and Why It Isn’t Easy

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+


Watch Tending the Wild: Decolonizing the Diet.

Big Pine Reservation’s Sustainable Foods Program and Bishop Paiute Tribe’s Food Sovereignty Program

By Clarissa Wei
KCET
Nov 21, 2016

Excerpt:

Big Pine Paiute-Shoshone tribe member Joseph Miller shows me around his town’s garden. There are two hoop houses with herbs and fresh heads of lettuce just popping out of the ground. Tomatoes are in abundance, with so many hybrid varieties that it’s hard to keep track.

“What we’re working towards is being able to not only create a sustainable food source, but to create food security,” Miller says. “We want to give our people the right to know without being in the dark and wary about where their food is coming from, or how long it’s been on a truck.”

[Read more →]

November 28, 2016   Comments Off on Why Two California Indian Tribes are Growing Their Own Food, and Why It Isn’t Easy

Zimbabwe: Climate Change Changes Face of Urban Agriculture

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

zimclim

Research has shown that trees can help us to adapt to a changing climate and combat drought by influencing rainfall patterns and helping to retain the water received.

By Chipo Masara
All Africa
Nov 13, 2016

Excerpt:

Rain is something that Zimbabweans very much look forward to. For years, many have looked up to their rain-fed agricultural projects to bring them food relief in the face of gnawing hunger that has resulted from the country’s economic collapse. The unpredictable pattern that now characterises the rainy seasons, however, has lately been rendering people’s effort useless.

Urban agriculture is part of Zimbabwe’s urban landscape and in Harare; frantic efforts by the city council to put an end to it came to naught — to the extent of the authorities seemingly throwing in the towel. It would seem they finally realised how unreasonable their push was to destroy an activity that brought food relief for many food-insecure urban households, most of who have been left to scrap for a living after their breadwinners lost jobs following either company closures or retrenchments.

[Read more →]

November 20, 2016   Comments Off on Zimbabwe: Climate Change Changes Face of Urban Agriculture

New Zealand: Construction of Christchurch’s new edible garden and cafe to start 2017

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

chrt
An early design for Otakaro Orchard.

The project is being driven by the Food Resilience Network, a collaborative group of about 30 organisations which have joined forces to encourage a strong local food economy.

By Liz Mcdonald
The Press
November 3 2016

Excerpt:

Project co-ordinator Chloe Waretini, of the Food Resilience Network, said it would be Christchurch’s most regenerative building.

It would not only be about resources such as water, energy and food, but also about making cities “more dynamic, lively and people-centred”, Waretini said.

[Read more →]

November 9, 2016   Comments Off on New Zealand: Construction of Christchurch’s new edible garden and cafe to start 2017

You Don’t Know ‘Till You Grow

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

1903veggarden

The importance of becoming rooted in gardening

By Claire Livingstone
4th geography student at University of British Columbia
Nov 2, 2016

It is estimated that one fifth of the greenhouse gases that we’re each responsible for, come from how we consume food(1). According to New York Times writer Michael Pollan(2), growing your own food is one of the best things you can do for the environment, as it reduces a sense of dependency on the ‘cheap energy’ that composes so much of an individual’s carbon footprint. As a fourth year UBC Geography student, I am exposed to the importance of being mindful of one’s environmental impacts on an individual level. In order for big changes to happen, we must start with the little ones, and shift how we interact with the Earth on a daily basis.

[Read more →]

November 3, 2016   Comments Off on You Don’t Know ‘Till You Grow

Paris, France launches licenses to ‘green’ (végétaliser) all you want

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

boxpar Click on image for larger file.

The goal by 2020 is to green Paris on more than 100 hectares with a third devoted to urban agriculture

This article has been roughly translated by Google Translate from La Relève et La Peste
By Christophe Noël et Jean-Pierre Viguié / Mairie de Paris
Oct 6, 2016

Roughly translated:

Here’s good news! Passed unnoticed this summer, this law passed by the elected council of Paris on July 1, and allows Paris residents to acquire a permit to green/grow on the place that you like best! A very nice alternative to green our cities from the 100% concrete …

Paris is one of the least “green” capitals where one finds relatively little space and almost no real green lung, as there are in London or Central Park. The mayor of Paris has made a strong move this time with her 100% green proposal. We see real, bold proposals for the French capital. The goal by 2020 is to green Paris on more than 100 hectares. All alternatives are in the proposals. Roofs, walls and facades can and will be grown on, a third will be devoted to urban agriculture. This proposals is long overdue. The proposal was passed under a near media blackout.

[Read more →]

October 19, 2016   Comments Off on Paris, France launches licenses to ‘green’ (végétaliser) all you want

How Walking in Nature Changes the Brain

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

grenw
Walking and biking on a gravel trail along the new Arbutus Greenway in Vancouver, BC.

These results “strongly suggest that getting out into natural environments” could be an easy and almost immediate way to improve moods for city dwellers, Mr. Bratman said.

By Gretchen Reynolds
New York Times
July 22, 2015

Excerpt:

City dwellers also have a higher risk for anxiety, depression and other mental illnesses than people living outside urban centers, studies show.

These developments seem to be linked to some extent, according to a growing body of research. Various studies have found that urban dwellers with little access to green spaces have a higher incidence of psychological problems than people living near parks and that city dwellers who visit natural environments have lower levels of stress hormones immediately afterward than people who have not recently been outside.

[Read more →]

September 12, 2016   Comments Off on How Walking in Nature Changes the Brain

Dubai’s Sustainable City Includes Urban Farming

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

bio2

There is a 3 hectare farm running across the City’s central spine. This community farm accommodates 38,000 sqft (3,500 sqm) of Biodome Greenhouses dedicated to the growing of fruits, herbs and vegetables.

By Nick Webster
The National AE
Sept 4, 2016

Excerpts:

The city’s urban farm produces more than 20 kinds of herbs and will soon start growing fruit and vegetables once the productive landscape matures. About 2,000 date palms are on the property. Green compost is used on everything grown.

“We are also looking into composting our food waste, turning it into a resource that will improve our soils.

[Read more →]

September 10, 2016   Comments Off on Dubai’s Sustainable City Includes Urban Farming