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Why are so many young Greeks turning to farming?

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A worker spreads olive harvest netting at an olive grove at Plomari village in Lesbos, Greece.

Eight years into an economic crisis, a shortage of jobs is leading many young Greeks to turn to the land.

By Nikolia Apostolou
Aljazeera
May 22, 2017

Excerpt:

Lesbos, Greece – Odysseas Elytis, the Greek Nobel laureate and poet, once wrote: “If you disintegrate Greece, in the end you’ll see that what you have left is an olive tree, a vineyard, and a ship. Which means: with these you can rebuild it.”

Having endured eight years of a deepening economic crisis, thousands of young Greeks are taking heed of Elytis’ words by leaving the cities to work on the land.

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May 26, 2017   Comments Off on Why are so many young Greeks turning to farming?

Portugal: Lisbon develops urban farming as part of its anti-crisis strategy

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The city plans on expanding the green space available for farming by converting a six hectares swamp into a large urban farm dedicated to the formation of unemployed inhabitants.

By Luc Berman
New Europe
June 8, 2015

Excerpt:

About five hundred families are currently managing and eating from the vegetables and fruits they harvested from their green plot. By 2017, the city aims at doubling the number of families benefitting from this program by transforming a few of the 25 hectares of green spaces still available in the city.

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May 21, 2017   Comments Off on Portugal: Lisbon develops urban farming as part of its anti-crisis strategy

Germany: Land use and regional supply capacities of urban food patterns: Berlin as an example

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Area use in ha and per cent for supplying Berlin according to type of land (left) and region of origin (right) in 2010 [own presentation and calculation based on NVS II, BMELV, FAOSTAT and others]

The article used the capital Berlin as an example to investigate different options industrialized nations (in particular urban areas) may have in order to contribute to a globally fairer and ecologically more sustainable supply system.

By Susanna Esther Hönle, Toni Meier, Olaf Christen
Science and Research
June 14, 2016

Abstract:

The future of world food security is often discussed in terms of population growth and climate change. The countries of the “Global South” are considered particularly vulnerable. However, increasing population in cities mean that food security is also of considerable relevance for the “Global North”. The focus here is not on food shortages, but on the “delocalization” of the production and consumption of food, which is making cities highly dependent on external factors.

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May 10, 2017   Comments Off on Germany: Land use and regional supply capacities of urban food patterns: Berlin as an example

Italy: Save the Gandusio Rooftop Garden in Bologna

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The garden, initially promoted by the Bologna City Council as a way to promote intercultural dialogue and social cohesion between the inhabitant of the social housing building is today being dismantled by the same City Council

Petition in English

Since 2010, the Gandusio rooftop garden promotes social cohesion, and intercultural dialogue in the social housing buildings of via Gandusio (Bologna). Over the years, gardeners have contributed to growing, in this unused common space, an intercultural and cohesive community, open to the whole public through the realization of various cultural initiatives open to the public. The garden, initially promoted by the City of Bologna has become an international case study, addressed by several scientific studies in the fields of agronomy, social sciences and urban planning.

The garden has been referred to as an innovative example of sustainable planning by the European Gazette Science for Environmental Policy and has been featured in several documentary films, including the internationally awarded documentary God Save The Green.

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May 8, 2017   Comments Off on Italy: Save the Gandusio Rooftop Garden in Bologna

France: Retailer Carrefour Unveils ‘Urban Agriculture’ Initiative

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Vegetable garden on the roof of the Villiers-en-Bière hypermarket in Seine-et-Marne

Other vegetable gardens are set to be created all through France: in Mérignac, a 6000 m² in-ground garden is being created near the Carrefour store.

Press Release
Carrefour
Apr 27, 2017

Villiers-en-Bière vegetable garden: over a 1200 m² surface area, ornamental and aromatic fruit trees and fruit and vegetable plants are being grown, using methods inspired by agro-ecology. It is managed by students from the Bougainville de Brie-Comte-Robert agricultural and horticultural school. They also share information about the garden with neighbouring schools and customers at the store. The garden should begin to bear its first fruit in early May and its yield will be sold in the store.

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May 5, 2017   Comments Off on France: Retailer Carrefour Unveils ‘Urban Agriculture’ Initiative

Urban farmers thrive in Swedish city

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Video.

In March 2017, they completed a roof top garden at Clarion Post Hotel

PressTV
May 1, 2017

Jonas Lindh and William Bailey share their experiences as city farmers in Gothenburg, Sweden. They explain why and how they started their business, and share the challenges they face in this process. Jonas Lindh and William Bailey, both with their roots in Human Ecology, Behavioral Sciences and community gardening, met in late 2015 and decided they wanted to grow commercially in Gothenburg.

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May 2, 2017   Comments Off on Urban farmers thrive in Swedish city

Home Kitchen Garden – in Italian

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By Sandra Longinotti
Maggio 2016

Home Kitchen Garden è un discorso aperto fra cucina e orto cittadino possibile, in una contaminazione continua fra gusto e lifestyle. Si parte dalla bellezza del fiore edule di alcune varietà orticole, spontanee e floreali che possono crescere anche in piccoli spazi urbani – sul davanzale di una finestra, sul balcone o in un piccolo giardino – per aprire un discorso più ampio su ogni specie.

Coltivazione, ricette, piccole idee living, curiosità e informazioni pratiche per piante comuni e molto diffuse come la Rosa o il Carciofo, così come per varietà meno conosciute, da cui lasciarsi sorprendere e ispirare. Ecco le quattordici varietà: Acmella, Amaranto, Begliuomini, Begonia, Borragine, Carciofo, Cipolla, Crisantemo, Finocchietto, Lavanda, Nasturzio, Rosa, Rosmarino e Viola.

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April 10, 2017   Comments Off on Home Kitchen Garden – in Italian

Luxembourg: Cows, pigs, sheep and goats are making their way to the city centre where an “urban farm” is being created

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Foto: Christophe Olinger.

Prime Minister attending: The aim of the event is to increase transparency and communication between producers and consumers, allowing people to ask questions and find out more about local agriculture.

Luxemburger Wort
Apr 1, 2017

Except:

A number of animals will be there and activities have been lined up, including milking cows, agricultural workshops for children, a bouncy castle and pedalling tractors.

Market stalls sell regional products and other stands provide information about farming produce and wine.

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April 8, 2017   Comments Off on Luxembourg: Cows, pigs, sheep and goats are making their way to the city centre where an “urban farm” is being created

1935 by Beate Hahn – ‘Hooray, We Sow and Harvest!’

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Click on image for larger file.

Published in Germany – A Garden Book For Children

By Beate Hahn (Horticulturist)
(The author is the mother of famous landscape architect Cornelia Oberlander)
1935 Wilh, Gottl, Korn Verlag, Breslau, Printed in Germany, 110 pages
(This translation was kindly done by Evelyne Teichert.)

Introduction

Today is yet another grim, cold day in November. Outside the wind is blowing through the streets, urging snowflakes along high up into the air. It roars around the street corner, and anyone who meets it will be blown down. This is quite ugly weather, and everyone is happy when they can once again sit in their warm home.

Here in our home a bright wood fire is crackling in the fireplace. When all the big and the small people have completed their daily tasks, we assemble around the red sheen of the fire, because father tells us stories. Mother says that this way she’ll never be able to mend all the torn children’s clothes, but everyone else thinks it is marvelous. If Peter and Lore move over just a bit, then you too will be able to join us on the bench by the fire and listen in. We also have a baked apple for you. you can hear them already crackling in the oven. Lisel, the oldest among us, gets up from time to time to tend to them.

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April 6, 2017   Comments Off on 1935 by Beate Hahn – ‘Hooray, We Sow and Harvest!’

Plot 29 : A Memoir – Therapy from an Allotment Plot

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Allan used Plot 29 to make sense of his childhood. Credit: Andrew Crowley

When I am disturbed, even angry, gardening has been a therapy. When I don’t want to talk I turn to Plot 29, or to a wilder piece of land by a northern sea. There, among seeds and trees, my breathing slows; my heart rate too. My anxieties slip away.’

By Elizabeth Grice
The Telegraph
2 Apr 2017
(Must see. Mike)

Plot 29 : A Memoir
By Allan Jenkins
HarperCollins Publishers
Mar 23, 2017

Excerpt:

“When I am disturbed, even angry,” Jenkins says, “gardening is a therapy. Whatever mood I’m in, I can walk through the gates and here, among the seeds and the trees, my breathing and my heart rate slow. My voice becomes slower and oddly deeper. It’s a great antidote to newspaper politics and to anxiety, a place where you can just be.”

Jenkins had plenty to be disturbed about. He and his older brother Christopher spent their early years in and out of “feral” children’s homes, often cruelly separated despite their closeness. At the ages of five and six, they were fostered by a middle-aged couple, Dudley and Lilian Drabble, in the Devon countryside, but spat out again at puberty to go their separate ways.

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April 2, 2017   Comments Off on Plot 29 : A Memoir – Therapy from an Allotment Plot

UK: Rooftop farming: how nature flourishes on London’s skyline

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Bee London head gardener Sean Gifford on one of the rooftop gardens Credit: Vibol Moeung

Bee London, which represents 320 businesses across the area, is working with the Wildlife Trust to design and deliver greening projects to Midtown

By Alice Vincent
The Telegraph
25 Mar 2017

Excerpt:

The winter purslane at the five star Rosewood Hotel in Holborn is excellent. Served immediately after picking, it is sweet and fresh. Amandine Chaignot, the hotel’s Executive Chef, tells me it’s the best crop they’ve ever had. However, I’m not eating it in the marble-walled serenity of the restaurant, but in the wind and drizzle on Rosewood’s roof, where it is grown in one of Bee London’s rooftop gardens.

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April 1, 2017   Comments Off on UK: Rooftop farming: how nature flourishes on London’s skyline

UK: Five garden crowdfunding projects to back this spring

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Natalia Jenger, Louisa Winning and friends founded Bottle of Ginger as a way to change the local soft drinks culture, growing ingredients and manufacturing their own drinks. Photograph: Bottle of Ginger

Crowdfunding is certainly becoming an alternative way of getting difficult-to-fund but important projects off the ground.

By Jane Perrone
The Guardian
Mar 24, 2017

Excerpt:

Gardening at Yarl’s Wood (target: £5,000)
What is it? A social and therapeutic gardening project for the women at Yarl’s Wood. The prohect would convert the current uninspiring gardens at Yarl’s Wood Immigration Removal Centre in Bedfordshire into places for female immigration detainees to sow, plant, weed and dig.

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March 30, 2017   Comments Off on UK: Five garden crowdfunding projects to back this spring

RUAF Update March 2017

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RUAF Foundation (Global partnership on sustainable Urban Agriculture and Food systems)

March 2017

Update on RUAF projects
• Dutch City Deal: Food on the Urban Agenda
• Governance of territorial food systems (GOUTER)
• Milan Urban Food Policy Pact Awards for good practices

News from RUAF partners
• City Region Food System Assessment – Colombo
• Composts now considered in the “Fertilizer Subsidy Programme” in Ghana
• A European Network of AgroEcoCities
• City-to-city learning: Ede (The Netherlands) visits Ghent (Belgium)
• Urban agriculture training and policy development in Nairobi

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March 29, 2017   Comments Off on RUAF Update March 2017

UK: Greater Manchester convicted criminals have totally transformed overgrown community garden

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Before and after – The lost garden in Weaste, Salford.

Beneath they found benches, raised flower beds and a smart cobbled alley.

By Neal Keeling
Manchester Evening Post
Mar 22, 2017

Excerpt:

Grafting for three days, a group of offenders on the Community Payback scheme have shifted four tonnes of rubbish to reveal a backstreet oasis.

The small garden with benches was created for elderly residents in the Weaste area to meet and chat.

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March 28, 2017   Comments Off on UK: Greater Manchester convicted criminals have totally transformed overgrown community garden

Progress threatens Istanbul’s historic gardens

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The Yedikule gardens provide a livelihood for more than 200 people in Istanbul. TRF/Stephen Starr

“Ten days ago they came and cut down all the trees almost to the roots,” he says. “I don’t know why they did that; maybe because they want a give better view for tourists to take photos of the walls. Who knows?”

By Stephen Starr
Reuters
Mar 16, 2017

Excerpt:

Recep Eraslan, 64, has worked a tiny sliver of land on Istanbul’s historic Sultanahmet peninsula for more than three decades.

He grows spring onions, arugula and cabbage on a 1.25-acre (0.5 hectare) plot along the city’s ancient Byzantine-era walls that are part of one of the oldest urban gardens, or bostans in Turkish, in the world.

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March 24, 2017   Comments Off on Progress threatens Istanbul’s historic gardens