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Category — Horticulture Therapy

1987 Article: Ability Garden at City Farmer, Vancouver

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backyardfarmer1987621 Click on image for larger file. (L-R) Barbara Raynor, Greg Birdsall, Paula Ford and Michael Levenston stand amid the beginnings of a “demonstration garden” for handicapped people, which will be situated within a garden located at Sixth and Maple. The new garden will feature raised beds and easy access for the handicapped. Jim Harrison Photo.

City Farmer brought together Raynor and Kuchta, acting as consultants, with landscape architect Mary-Jane McKay and carpenter Greg Birdsall to put together a demonstration garden specially designed for the handicapped to work in and learn from.

By Lucill Dahm
Vancouver Courier
Aug 16, 1987

You just can’t hold a determined green thumb down._

Although Barbara Raynor, 52, developed rheumatoid arthritis 15 years ago, eventually leaving her with two artificial knees and a “narrowing lifestyle,” she has been able to create and maintain a backyard “urban garden.”

Aside from the very noteworthy feat of actually accomplishing the carpentry hobby off the ground, Raynor has used the unique perspective of a disabled person to open the door to an activity previously denied to a person without the full use of his or her body.

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November 6, 2016   Comments Off on 1987 Article: Ability Garden at City Farmer, Vancouver

‘Like finding a treasure’: Community garden grows work opportunities in St. John’s, Newfoundland

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The Transition Employment team at the Elaine Dobbin Centre shows off its potato harvest. (Krissy Holmes/CBC)

“I find it a bit hard, but it’s good work for me,” says Transitions Employment Program client

By Marilyn Boone
CBC News
Oct 23, 2016

Excerpt:

“Everything you can see — the fencing, the beds, the garden plots — have all been made by my transitions kids who are here to learn about work.”

The community garden has grown to 40 beds, producing berries and vegetables, as well as spuds. Some of the produce is used at the Pantry cafe inside the Elaine Dobbin Centre, and four beds of potatoes go to a food bank at Bridges to Hope.

“Horticultural therapy” is how Marshall described it.

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October 29, 2016   Comments Off on ‘Like finding a treasure’: Community garden grows work opportunities in St. John’s, Newfoundland

Two friends, one garden plot: families from Russia and Ukraine grow together in Orem, Utah

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Katya Ivie, left, from Russia and Maryna Akhtyrska from Ukraine are friends who shared a garden plot this summer at a community garden in Orem.

This is the third in a four-part series of articles about a local community garden and how people from around the globe met and learned each other’s stories while working the soil.

By Laura Giles
Day Herald
Oct 7, 2016

Excerpt:

At the garden this summer, Katya enjoyed having the opportunity to visit with Russian and Ukrainian friends while they all worked in their plots. They also helped each other if one was away on vacation or could not make it to the garden that day.

“Growing plants is the same as growing kids – lots of hard work,” Katya said. “It was interesting to see the people from different countries and what they grew,” she said about the community garden. “The whole season here is very dry. We have to water almost every day. In Russia, we only have to water maybe twice a week at most,” she said.

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October 13, 2016   Comments Off on Two friends, one garden plot: families from Russia and Ukraine grow together in Orem, Utah

Philippines: Retired Police Officer Wants to Use Square Foot Gardening to Rehabilitate Drug Offenders

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CAGAYAN DE ORO. Retired police officer Honorio Cervantes in his organic farm at Zone 5, Barangay Pagatpat, this city. An advocate of square foot gardening, he dreams that his gardening method will be a model project to the youth and even former drug personalities.

“As a farmer, I have this movement I call FAITH which means ‘Food Always in the Home’.

By Abigail Viguella
Sun Star
Oct 1, 2016

Excerpt:

A retired city police director and a barangay kagawad, Cervantes is aware of the inevitable dilemma of drug dependents who have already surrendered. The square foot urban gardening may be a venue for recovery and reconciliation with one’s self, he noted.

“It is amazing how far this project has come. Agriculture specialists, agriculture majors, and even common farming enthusiasts are now coming to my farm just to have me discuss this method to them,” said Cervantes.

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October 6, 2016   Comments Off on Philippines: Retired Police Officer Wants to Use Square Foot Gardening to Rehabilitate Drug Offenders

UK: Recovering addicts grow confidence at Newcastle allotment plot

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Andrew Gibson, left, and Dan Norman in the polytunnel they have built as part of the garden project. Picture: Malcolm Hart.

The aim of the garden is to get people involve healthy activities and build their confidence.

By Jack Furness
The Sentinel
September 26, 2016

Excerpt:

One of the volunteers, Andrew Gibson, has been taken on by the centre full-time to maintain the plot.

The 38-year old, from Newcastle, said: “I wanted to give something back. I was a hopeless drug addict and an alcoholic and my life wasn’t really worth living until I came into rehab.

“I started taking drugs when I was 13 and took them all of the way through my adult life. And when I was 30, alcohol started to become a major problem.

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October 3, 2016   Comments Off on UK: Recovering addicts grow confidence at Newcastle allotment plot

San Quentin State Prison – Insight Garden Program (IGP)

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The Garden Class Begins With A Guided Meditation.

“The guys in the program have so many Aha! moments when they learn how growing food and creating gardens can be a solution for healing many systems: social systems, food systems and environmental systems.”

Kalliopeia Foundation
2016

Excerpt:

THE H-UNIT AT San Quentin State Prison just north of San Francisco houses inmates serving sentences under 15 years. Enclosed in a far corner of the barren blacktop expanse sit four raised beds of greens, herbs and ornamental plants. At this green oasis, men enrolled in the Insight Garden Program (IGP) are offered the opportunity to re-envision their lives as fertile ground. Here, inmates dig the soil, plant seeds, pull weeds and spread mulch. Along with this vocational training, they’re also introduced to holistic practices like mindfulness meditation and systems thinking. This unique approach helps inmates connect to self, nature and community, providing a foundation for a healthier life while in prison and after release.

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September 21, 2016   Comments Off on San Quentin State Prison – Insight Garden Program (IGP)

Chicago: 28–year-old master gardener started three organic urban farms

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“It definitely keeps you sane when you’re in an urban environment that is sometimes full of conflict.”

By Amy Rutledge
WGN TV
Sept 12, 2016

Excerpt:

While the community is labeled a “food desert,” Stephanie and her helpers – many of them special needs students– teach kids and adults in the neighborhood how to grow food to feed their own families or even supplement their income.

Together with resident Godwin Akpan, who manages a neighborhood food bank, Dunn is spreading healthy food across the area. They’re even hosting their first big farmers market this fall, which they hope sales will raise money to expand the urban gardening and farming initiative.

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September 18, 2016   Comments Off on Chicago: 28–year-old master gardener started three organic urban farms

How Walking in Nature Changes the Brain

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Walking and biking on a gravel trail along the new Arbutus Greenway in Vancouver, BC.

These results “strongly suggest that getting out into natural environments” could be an easy and almost immediate way to improve moods for city dwellers, Mr. Bratman said.

By Gretchen Reynolds
New York Times
July 22, 2015

Excerpt:

City dwellers also have a higher risk for anxiety, depression and other mental illnesses than people living outside urban centers, studies show.

These developments seem to be linked to some extent, according to a growing body of research. Various studies have found that urban dwellers with little access to green spaces have a higher incidence of psychological problems than people living near parks and that city dwellers who visit natural environments have lower levels of stress hormones immediately afterward than people who have not recently been outside.

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September 12, 2016   Comments Off on How Walking in Nature Changes the Brain

Huntington Station garden in Long Island brings vets and veggies together

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Veteran Robert Bishop of Huntington tends to his vegetables at the Gateway Park Community Garden in Huntington Station on Monday, Aug. 22, 2016. The community garden has set aside garden beds for former servicemen and -women to grow their own fresh produce. Photo Credit: Daniel Goodrich

Long Island has the second highest rate of returning veterans in the United States, according to the Veterans Health Alliance of Long Island.

By Valerie Bauman
NewsDay
Aug 23, 2016

Excerpt:

Pillmeier, 56, is taking advantage of new veterans-only planting beds that opened in June at the Gateway Community Garden in Huntington Station. The project was established through a collaboration between The Harry Chapin Food Bank and Humanitarian Center and the Long Island Community Agriculture Network, both based in Huntington Station.

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September 2, 2016   Comments Off on Huntington Station garden in Long Island brings vets and veggies together

Welcome to Tha Flower Factory: Vacant East Baltimore lot blossoms into something beautiful

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waltWalker Marsh created “Tha Flower Factory,” by transforming a vacant lot in East Baltimore into a half-acre full production flower farm. He submitted a winning idea in Baltimore City’s Growing Green Design Competition and hopes to inspire other urban farmers while beautifying the neighborhood, reducing pollution levels and providing job training. (Courtesy of the Mayor’s Office).

Walker’s idea represents a creative way of thinking about supporting urban agriculture, eliminating blight, reducing stormwater runoff, lowering lead levels, adding a community resource, providing job training and beautifying the city.

By Zoe Zellers
WWMT West Michigan
August 18th 2016

Excerpt:

What happens when residents walk by and see the beauty that has bloomed on their block? What’s their reaction like and how does that make you feel?

Everyone loves it! Folks have seen it from the very beginning when the growers and I were just out there moving rocks around to beautiful sunflowers popping up. I have received nothing but support and it makes me feel accomplished because I know people enjoy what I’m doing.

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August 26, 2016   Comments Off on Welcome to Tha Flower Factory: Vacant East Baltimore lot blossoms into something beautiful

Deeply Rooted: Medicinal Plant Cultivation in Techtropolis

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The book is a starter guide for growing and using local plants as medicine.

By Author, Bonnie Rose Weaver, and editor, Mari Amend
Kickstarter
Aug 2016

Deeply Rooted includes:

Over 40 original drawings and graphics by Bonnie Rose Weaver

Foreword by San Francisco urban farmer Caitlyn Galloway of Little City Gardens

Essay by Lauren Kaneko-Jones, LAc of SWAP and Well in the West about living in harmony with the seasons -Specific herbal cultivation techniques

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August 23, 2016   Comments Off on Deeply Rooted: Medicinal Plant Cultivation in Techtropolis

NRS Healthcare encourages more people to start gardening no matter their age or ability

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Only 62% of people aged over 65 are involved in gardening.

Excerpt:

To find out whether gardening is a pastime that the older generation already enjoy, NRS Healthcare surveyed 503 people over the age of 65 in the UK asking “Do you garden?” 62% answered that they do.

NRS Healthcare felt that the health benefits of gardening, which include the following, are so far reaching that they should encourage more older people to take up this relatively easy activity:

The number of disabled people in the UK is at just over 10 million. Gardening is a simple exercise that can help to build strength and encourage better physical health gently.

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August 13, 2016   Comments Off on NRS Healthcare encourages more people to start gardening no matter their age or ability

Gardens and health: Implications for policy and practice

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We recommend that the key influencers in the health, environmental, and gardening and horticulture sectors need to come together and develop a stronger joint strategy that will allow them to have a greater influence on policy on gardens and health at the strategic as well as local level, and contribute constructively to debates on sustainability

By David Buck
The King’s Fund is an independent charity working to improve health and care in England.
This report was commissioned by the National Gardens Scheme
May 2016

Excerpt:

Executive summary: What this report is about

This report looks at the impact of gardens and gardening on health and wellbeing, and explores what the NHS and the wider health and social care system can do to maximise this impact.
Gardens are often thought of as intimate private spaces attached to private households but they can also be large private or formal gardens open to the public, or part of hospitals, care homes or hospices. Gardens serve many purposes: they can be cultivated for flowers or growing food; used as spaces for exercise, relaxation, solace and recovery; used as places to play, meet and volunteer; and can be part of wider environmental, planning or sustainability policies.

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August 3, 2016   Comments Off on Gardens and health: Implications for policy and practice

Boston Urban Farm that once benefited the homeless now run by fast-food chain

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A tractor and greenhouse are pictured on the farm. Photo Timothy Tai For The Boston Globe.

Before it was abandoned, when hundreds of homeless people, addicts, and troubled teens slept there every night, the island in Boston Harbor had a thriving farm that produced thousands of pounds of organically grown vegetables, herbs, eggs, honey, and more.

By David Abel
Boston GLOBE
JULY 25, 2016

Excerpt:

Company officials also said they intend to grow the produce most used at their restaurants — some 40,000 pounds of kale, beets, cabbage, and other vegetables — rather than basing their choice of crops on the community’s needs.

“It’s heartbreaking what’s happening,” said Elissa Nabozny, a former volunteer on the farm.

Nabozny said she doesn’t understand why the city didn’t allow its employees, or a nonprofit group devoted to the homeless, to use the 2.5 acres of farmland. The farm used to be run by Serving Ourselves, a city job-training program for the homeless that focused on agriculture.

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July 30, 2016   Comments Off on Boston Urban Farm that once benefited the homeless now run by fast-food chain

Meet the refugee farmers of Cleveland who are actually making America great again

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The politicians at the Republican National Convention like to depict refugees as terrorists and a danger to American society. But if they took a short trip to the farm, they could get a very different perspective.

By Casey Tolan
Fusion
July 21, 2016

Excerpt:

On the Republican National Convention stage, refugees have been a popular punching bag. Rudy Giuliani said Syrian refugees could be “operatives who are terrorists, who are going to come to Western Europe and here and kill us.” Ted Cruz claimed that the Obama administration was “admitting ISIS terrorists as refugees.”

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July 22, 2016   Comments Off on Meet the refugee farmers of Cleveland who are actually making America great again