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Category — Horticulture Therapy

Preparing a community garden to honor local families affected by opioid crisis

The garden will be located on Evergreen Street, Rochester. (WHAM Photo)

Families who have lost someone to drugs will have the opportunity to get a plot of the garden, as a way to memorialize their loved one.

WHAM
April 14, 2018

Excerpt:

Rochester, N.Y. – On Saturday, many volunteers began creating a community garden on an empty plot of land, that was once a haven for drug users, until the City of Rochester chose to bulldoze the abandoned house.

Volunteers were cleaning up the site on Evergreen Street in preparation for that garden, which is meant to honor those who have died from drug overdoses and give hope to those struggling.

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April 21, 2018   No Comments

Japan: In Kanagawa, homeless grow crops and confidence

Kiyoko Ojima, who helps homeless and other needy people by giving them opportunities to work in agriculture, is seen at her field in Fujisawa, Kanagawa Prefecture, on March 19. Satoko Kawasaki.

“I wanted to help those who are starving by growing crops,” she said of her passion for agriculture that has led her to run a vegetable field. “There are many people in Japan, too, who struggle to put food on the table.”

By Magdalena Osumi
Japan Times
Apr 9, 2018

Excerpt:

Ojima, 39, engages homeless and other people on social assistance in work in the field, in the city of Fujisawa, Kanagawa Prefecture. “Our main goal is to help these people regain confidence … so they can eventually get back on their feet,” she said in a recent interview with The Japan Times.

Every April about 10 people, men and women ranging in age from their 20s to their 60s, come to Ojima’s 10,000-square-meter field to sow seeds, cut weeds, water plants and harvest crops.

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April 14, 2018   No Comments

Guns to shovels: Oakland activists melt deadly weapons into garden tools

50 guns melted and cast into 50 shovels, to plant 50 trees

By Lisa M. Krieger
The Mercury News
Mar 28, 2018

OAKLAND, Calif. — A small arsenal of deadly Bay Area weapons is on its way to Atlanta, soon to be transformed from tools of violence to tools of peace, healing and hope.

The “Lead To Life” project — 50 guns melted and cast into 50 shovels, to plant 50 trees — will commemorate the 50 years since a bullet struck down civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. as he stood on the balcony of Room 306 at Lorraine Motel in Memphis, changing America forever.

Organized by two young Oakland activists and hosted by The King Center for Nonviolent Social Change, the April 6 ceremony will not just mourn the loss of King but also other lives claimed by mass shootings, suicides, gang warfare and domestic violence.

It’s a modern-day spin on the biblical injunction to turn swords into plowshares. Using new shovels, victims of gun violence will help plant young trees at the King Center in Atlanta and selected murder sites in the city. Then the tools will be donated to urban gardeners to grow food for inner-city residents.

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April 3, 2018   Comments Off on Guns to shovels: Oakland activists melt deadly weapons into garden tools

Impacts of Urban Agriculture on the Determinants of Health: Scoping Review Protocol

1870, The Graphic, London. Click image to see larger file.

Seeks to integrate beneficial and adverse effects of UA on health at different level of influence (individuals, households, and community)

By Pierre Paul Audate, Melissa A Fernandez, Geneviève Cloutier, Alexandre Lebel,
Jmir Research Protocols
27.03.18 in Vol 7, No 3 (2018): March

Excerpts:

Background: Since the 1990s, urban agriculture (UA) has contributed to improving food security in low- and middle- income countries. Now, it is implemented as a multifunctional intervention that can influence various determinants of health (eg, food security, social relationships). Studies of interest stem from several research disciplines, use a wide range of methods, and show results that are sometimes inconsistent. Current studies have not summarized the overall effects of UA on health and its determinants.

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April 3, 2018   Comments Off on Impacts of Urban Agriculture on the Determinants of Health: Scoping Review Protocol

Canada: New docu-series focuses on therapeutic horticulture for the visually impaired

The Growing Sense documentary series follows new friends Milena Khazanavicius (right), a visually impaired gardening enthusiast, and Rosmarie Lohnes from the Helping Nature Heal company on a season’s worth of planting, harvesting and healing. (MARK PIKE)

“I became a therapeutic horticulturalist instead of a horticultural therapist, and now I mentor and assist people who may or may not have a strict medical diagnosis but who believe that nature can heal them,” she says.

By Lisa Cochrane
Chronicle Herald
Mar 19, 2018

Excerpt:

“They focus on scent and textures, the sound of the wind. All the senses, not just the visual,” Oakes said.

They also tackle some of Lohnes’ more challenging landscaping projects, all with an eco-friendly twist.

Along the way, according to a Tell Tale release, the characters explore the many benefits of community gardening, the healing powers of connecting with nature and the satisfaction of growing one’s own food. And keeping AMI-tv’s mandate in mind, they share helpful tips for gardeners of all abilities, including those living with sight loss.

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March 28, 2018   Comments Off on Canada: New docu-series focuses on therapeutic horticulture for the visually impaired

Urban Gardens Flourish in South Florida’s Food Deserts

A group of children tends to a garden in Liberty City set up by the non-profit organization, Health in the Hood.

“I can just walk out my door if I want a salad. If I want to make a sweet potato pie, I have the sweet potatoes right here. And, so do my neighbors,” said Fowles.

By Teresa Joseph
NBCMiami
Mar 8, 2018

Excerpt:

Health in the Hood sets up gardens in communities in Miami-Dade and Broward counties in an effort to help residents gain access to healthy, fresh vegetables. Asha Loring is the founder of the group and she says healthy attitudes are being adopted in these communities.

Kids are growing up with vegetables in their backyard where they would not be able to that if they were 10 blocks away from the garden,” said Loring. “We’re really getting to see people’s trajectories changing from growing up in a food environment.”

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March 14, 2018   Comments Off on Urban Gardens Flourish in South Florida’s Food Deserts

Kentucky: New program will help teach recovering addicts job skills at Berea Urban Farm

‘These women are our sisters, our mothers, and our daughters. So when we invest in them, we’re investing in our community. If we don’t do it, who’s going to? Who’s going to?’

Editorial
Richmond Register
Mar 4, 2018

Excerpt:

Participants will care for nine raised beds that contain a variety of plants, course designer Heather Richardson said. They also will create educational signage, conduct tours of the farm, all the while learning topics including soil restoration, planting, harvesting and cooking. At the culmination of the 14-week course, the women will prepare a meal for a small group when they receive their certificates of completion.

For those who come to Liberty Place or other recovery facilities, one of the biggest obstacles to staying sober is finding a job. Unfortunately, with a felony record and little to no job skills, finding a job is an uphill battle for recovering addicts because few employers are willing to give them a chance.

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March 11, 2018   Comments Off on Kentucky: New program will help teach recovering addicts job skills at Berea Urban Farm

How community gardens and block associations help stem urban violence

Children at the South Merrill Community Garden in Chicago taking part in a weekly activity program funded by the Chicago Safe and Peaceful Communities Fund. All images courtesy of the Safe and Peaceful Communities Fund. Taken by True Star Media.

Inside a case study on Chicago’s South Side empowering community groups to design their own solutions

By Patrick Sisson
Curbed
Feb 27, 2018

Excerpt:

The South Merrill Community Garden on Chicago’s South Side fills a literal hole in its community. Slipped between between two brick apartment buildings, the small plot was established in the 1980s by neighborhood residents in the predominantly black part of town, who created a small flower garden using bricks from a demolished building. In 2010, area students took over, using the garden to memorialize Troy Law, a local child killed as a result of domestic abuse.

The garden fell into disuse a few years later, weeds overrunning the soil. In 2012, shots rang out as someone was chased through the overgrowth. No one was hurt, but the errant fire galvanized a group of residents to get rid of the eyesore.

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March 8, 2018   Comments Off on How community gardens and block associations help stem urban violence

Alaska: Mountain View urban farm offers opportunity for refugee farmers

Mountain View is the most diverse neighborhood in the U.S., according to the 2014 diversity census created by UAA’s sociology professor, Chad Farrell.

By Mizelle Mayo
The Northern Light
February 21, 2018

Excerpt:

Two years ago, the Anchorage Community Land Trust received a grant to build a farmer’s market on the vacant lots where the farm is going to be. The initial farmer’s market season was a success with over 27 vendors involved. In the summer of 2017, they put $20,000 directly into the pockets of the entrepreneurs in the neighborhood.

The partnership of Catholic Social Services and ACLT created the Grow North Farm-raiser event to raise money for an urban farm in the heart of Mountain View neighborhood.

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March 1, 2018   Comments Off on Alaska: Mountain View urban farm offers opportunity for refugee farmers

Community And Vegetables Grow Side-By-Side In Syrian Refugee Camp Gardens

Syrian gardeners at the Domiz refugee camp in northern Iraq share the harvest.
Kastro Yosef/The Lemon Tree Trust

Perkins and her colleagues emphasize the immediate rewards of camp greening with residents — farming skills, keeping memories of home alive, building community, and accessing fruits and vegetables they would not otherwise have.

By Julia Travers
NPR
Feb 22, 2018
(Must see. Mike)

Excerpt:

Fig and pomegranate trees, grapes, carrots, and narcissus flowers are some of the plants that Aveen Ismail like to grow in the Domiz refugee camp in Northern Iraq where they live. That’s because these plants remind her of Syria and home.

At first, Ismail did not find the dry land welcoming. But she values greenery and gardening, so she cultivated a small patch of land next to the house her family built in the camp.

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February 24, 2018   Comments Off on Community And Vegetables Grow Side-By-Side In Syrian Refugee Camp Gardens

Urban gardening might save your life

Click image to see larger file. Homegrown food is homegrown wealth. The foresighted farmer makes a garden plan showing what to plant, when to plant, and when to make second plantings. The plan shows how to cultivate and keep the garden free of weeds, and what poison spray to use to kill the insects that might eat up the vegetables. A garden is meant to feed the family, not the bugs and worms. Lange, Dorothea, photographer Created / Published 1936 Feb.

Some of my fondest childhood memories are of the wonderful taste of truly fresh corn, a cucumber picked from the vine, sliced then soaked in vinegar or eating slices of a tomato still warm from the sun, trying to keep the juice from running down your chin.

By Bill Wadford
The Fayetteville Observer
Feb 15, 2018

Excerpt:

As I grow older I have become aware of how disconnected we have become from our food and the land. Family farms have become endangered species and the majority of folks that live in, and immediately around, the city don’t even bother with a small herb plot by the back door, a backyard raised bed containing a few fresh, nutritious vegetables or even some 5 gallon buckets on the patio or balcony with cherry tomatoes or sweet peppers growing in them.

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February 24, 2018   Comments Off on Urban gardening might save your life

Urban Agriculture Promotes Peace, Engages Community

Canticle Farm from Molly Leebove on Vimeo.

Walking down the steps to the garden, I was greeted by groves of trees and growing strawberries, kale, chard, herbs and peppers. Surrounded by nature, I no longer felt as though I was in Oakland.

By Catherine Bither
The Miscellany News
February 14, 2018

Excerpt:

One urban farm I have come back to again and again is Canticle Farm in Oakland, CA. Canticle Farm is a small, humble group of houses in East Oakland, forming an “intergenerational, interracial, interfaith community” (Canticle Farm, “About”). In the middle of a high-crime food desert, Canticle Farm sticks out as a haven for all in the area. In fact, the farm sits right in the middle of rival gang territory, yet has never experienced any sort of violence. The farm does not even have gates surrounding the area, unlike neighboring houses. Residents and workers are welcoming to everyone looking for a safe, peaceful, restorative space.

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February 23, 2018   Comments Off on Urban Agriculture Promotes Peace, Engages Community

Run the Jewels’ Michael Render on How Urban Farming Can Help the Black Community

Michael Render (aka Killer Mike, right) speaks with Decton Hylton, head of the Athens Land Trust’s community agriculture program, at the West Broad Market Garden. Photo Credit: Jessica Silverman

“When I was growing up as a kid, people had gardens right in their backyard. People had chickens right in their backyard, and I lived in Atlanta, I lived in the West End neighborhood in Atlanta. Dr. King’s parents lived there.

By Blake Aued
Flagpole
Feb 14, 2018

Excerpt:

It was a blockbuster afternoon for the West Broad Market Garden. With a film crew and his Run the Jewels partner El-P in tow, rapper and activist Michael Render—better known as Killer Mike, though he asked not to be identified by his stage name because his mother doesn’t like it—spent more than an hour touring the Athens Land Trust’s community garden in the largely black West Broad neighborhood on Wednesday, Feb. 7, the day before Run the Jewels played a sold-out show at the Georgia Theatre. They also met with students in the land trust’s Young Urban Farmers program and walked down the street to garden matriarch Ethel “Ms. Ethel” Collins’ house for dinner.

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February 20, 2018   Comments Off on Run the Jewels’ Michael Render on How Urban Farming Can Help the Black Community

Chickens are helping senior citizens fight loneliness in a major way

A few little chooks are making big changes in the lives of elderly patients, helping them fight depression and dementia.

By Jessica Salter
Telegraph
31 Oct 2014

Excerpt:

Owen Turnbull is giving a tiny five-day-old chick a bath in the sink of a communal launderette. The chick, which is chirping away as he talks to it, is one of four orphans. ‘Their mam died three days ago,’ he says, in his soft Geordie accent. ‘I found her when I went to feed them. I was sad about losing her – I do get attached to them.’

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February 17, 2018   Comments Off on Chickens are helping senior citizens fight loneliness in a major way

UK: TV’s Mark Lane helps turn derelict Whitechapel wasteland into a gardeners’ world

The site was full of rubble and weeds, but volunteers have turned it into a lush garden with an orchard, pond, plant nursery and food growing area.

By Mike Brooke
Dockland sand East London Advertiser
Feb 14, 2018

Excerpt:

Mark himself has to use a wheelchair after his car crash. But the former Royal Institute of British Architects’ director retrained and set up a garden design business, then joined the Gardeners’ World programme.

“I am living proof of how the great outdoors and wildlife can change your life,” he said.

“My disability in a strange way has made me determined to promote the great outdoors to others.

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February 15, 2018   Comments Off on UK: TV’s Mark Lane helps turn derelict Whitechapel wasteland into a gardeners’ world