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Category — Horticulture Therapy

Ottawa: Angelina Singson says her community garden plot is better than therapy after escaping domestic violence

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Ottawa’s Interval House helped more than 270 women and children escape abuse last year.

By Emma Jackson
Metro
Jun 26 2016

Excerpt:

Angelina Singson kneels in her community garden plot, planting summer squash in a crooked row beside an overgrown fence.

Like her vegetables, this is where Singson thrives: in the garden, making things grow.

“Why should I go to therapy, when I get free tomatoes from the garden?” she said. “You work it, you feel like you’ve accomplished something. There’s no better therapy than that.”

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June 30, 2016   No Comments

Immigrant students dig into learning English at Halifax urban farm

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redhalifNew Canadian students at Citadel High School are learning English while working on an urban farm. Many of the students arrived from Syria this winter and are connecting with their new community by volunteering at Common Roots Urban Farm. See video on the site.

“They love Canada, they understand that they are here to have another chance and they are really thankful,” said Majaess.

By Alexa MacLean
CBC
June 7, 2016

Excerpt:

“The kids are coming once a week to help out and be involved. It’s great because so many of them have a farming background,” Melrose said.

The urban farm opened up in 2012 on the former site of Queen Elizabeth High School.

Part of the produce grown by the students is donated to the food bank.

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June 13, 2016   Comments Off on Immigrant students dig into learning English at Halifax urban farm

How a Rooftop Garden, Local Farming Helped One Hospital Boost Patient Satisfaction

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hosrofKerry Gold, head of dining services and chef for New Milford Hospital, stands next to an aeroponic tower, one of several in a rooftop garden at the hospital on Tuesday.
Photo: Carol Kaliff / Hearst Connecticut Media.

New Milford Hospital in Connecticut champions food as preventive medicine through homegrown meals.

By Genevieve Diesing
Hospitals and Health Networks
June 6, 2016

Excerpt:

With a focus on seasonal, unprocessed food and a classically trained chef at the kitchen’s helm, New Milford’s menu resembles that of a chic, farm-to-table restaurant rather than a typical hospital cafeteria: The vegetable dish will depend on what was picked from its rooftop garden that day, or what it received from the nine local farms from which it regularly sources ingredients. The finished product is a healthful menu (a typical dessert is a chickpea chocolate cake, for instance) that New Milford’s patients, staff and community have come to love.

“Often, patients will be discharged, and will ask if they can stay for lunch,” says Chef Kerry Gold.

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June 12, 2016   Comments Off on How a Rooftop Garden, Local Farming Helped One Hospital Boost Patient Satisfaction

Mulberry Diaries: Tales of Urban Farming

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firfruitFirst Fruits (from Landscapes and Interiors, 1899) Édouard Vuillard. Click on image for larger file.

A licensed psychotherapist in Los Angeles unwinds in her garden

By Tara Fass
Huffington Post
May 31, 2016

Excerpt

Ultimately, urban farming is a good hobby and break from my profession. What better way to unplug, to ritualize growing with companion and pooch in tow. Berries ripen in bursts and when they do picking can be done at least twice a day. The subtle pop as the ripened fruit gently falls into one’s palm is exciting beyond imagination. Searching the leaves for fruit, I better understand a hunter’s delight.

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June 4, 2016   Comments Off on Mulberry Diaries: Tales of Urban Farming

The real value of urban farming. (Hint: It’s not always the food.)

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The environmental benefits of urban farming get even more complicated when we consider indoor “vertical farms,” which are often touted as a sustainable option that use less soil and water. Although designs differ, some of these set-ups can use an enormous amount of energy, especially if they require artificial lighting.

By Brad Plumer
VOX
May 16, 2016

Excerpt:

“It’s hard to make sweeping generalizations here,” Santo told me. When designed right, urban farms can make some modest but valuable improvements to the sustainability of our food system. But when designed poorly, they can end up being even worse for the environment — say, if they’re using fertilizer inefficiently and polluting nearby waters with nitrogen run-off.

In our conversation, Santo mentioned one feature of urban farms that often gets shortchanged in dry policy discussions: “They can reconnect people with how to grow food.”

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May 22, 2016   Comments Off on The real value of urban farming. (Hint: It’s not always the food.)

A Review Of The Benefits And Limitations Of Urban Agriculture

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Vacant Lots To Vibrant Plot

By Raychel Santo Anne Palmer Brent Kim
John Hopkins Centre for Liveable Future
May 2016
(Must see. Mike)

Excerpt:

Recommendations for framing the merits of urban agriculture.

Urban agriculture should be evaluated for the multifaceted nature of its outcomes – social, health, environmental, and economic – and not merely for its potential outputs in terms of food production or economic development measures.

The list below offers a number of evidence-based talking points for advocates seeking to advance urban agriculture policy and programs:

1) Urban agriculture’s most significant benefits center around its ability to increase social capital, community well-being, and civic engagement with the food system.

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May 9, 2016   Comments Off on A Review Of The Benefits And Limitations Of Urban Agriculture

Urban farm gives fresh start to youth and homeless in Christchurch, New Zealand

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chrzCultivate Christchurch hopes to scale up in the coming months after gaining access to two larger sites.

“As a young person, it’s really hard to get into employment if you don’t have either the networks or qualifications or haven’t had to practice those skills,” Stewart said.

By Alice Cannet
The Press
April 25 2016

Excerpt:

One of Cultivate’s volunteers had been out of work and education for seven years before joining the group.

She had since put spent nearly 100 hours in the garden in the last three months and was studying horticulture at the National Trades Academy.

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April 28, 2016   Comments Off on Urban farm gives fresh start to youth and homeless in Christchurch, New Zealand

Toronto: Bell Manor Community Garden users talk about the benefits of growing in a ‘magical place’

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Welcome to Bell Manor Community Garden.

Stonegate Community Health Centre releases video in support of their food efforts

Etobicoke Guardian
Apr 23, 2016

Excerpt:

“Many of our residents live on fixed or low incomes. Providing the opportunity to grow their own fresh, healthy food is often a necessity, not a luxury,” Julia Graham, Stonegate CHC’s community food program co-ordinator, said in a statement.

In recent years, the garden has come to serve an even greater need, as the nearby Valu-Mart, which provided the only walkable access to fresh food in the community, was closed two years ago to make way for condominiums.

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April 27, 2016   Comments Off on Toronto: Bell Manor Community Garden users talk about the benefits of growing in a ‘magical place’

Tomatoes and Google connect a Canadian urban farmer to new Syrian neighbour

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‘This is straight out of Star Trek,’ says urban farmer Curtis Stone about translated encounter

“It’s amazing how urban gardening and urban agriculture really connects people, because food crosses all cultural and language barriers.”

By Lisa Johnson
CBC News
Apr 12, 2016

Excerpt:

Then the man opened Google Translate, an app that provides two-way speech translation.

“I am a tomato farmer from Syria,” the man said, through his phone.

“I was stoked and I said, ‘oh, you like tomatoes?'” said Stone, who invited his new neighbour into his greenhouse.

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April 16, 2016   Comments Off on Tomatoes and Google connect a Canadian urban farmer to new Syrian neighbour

India: Urban farm in Navi Mumbai grows food for patients

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navi
An aerial view of the urban farm at the medical facility in Navi Mumbai.

“The not-for-profit, through its project, has provided the medical facility fresh organic vegetables that are grown without using chemical fertilisers.”

By Badri Chatterjee
Hindustan Times Mumbai
Apr 11, 2016 0

Excerpt:

Three years ago, a non-governmental organisation (NGO) set out on a green mission to convert a one-acre barren land on the campus of a medical research facility in Navi Mumbai into an organic farm.

The once-barren plot is now grows herbs, vegetables plants and fruit trees, which are fed to patients undergoing treatment at the facility. This urban farm is also home to more than 80 species of birds and 25 species of butterflies and moths.

The NGO, Green Souls, has ever since been promoting urban farming to city dwellers, who are encouraged to grow food on building terraces, balconies and small plots of land.

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April 15, 2016   Comments Off on India: Urban farm in Navi Mumbai grows food for patients

Individuals, organizations grow fresh produce to donate to food pantries in Columbia, Missouri

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colu
Director of Urban Farming Carrie Hargrove gives a tour March 10 at the Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture. CCUA has partnered with The Food Bank to increase the amount of produce available to low-income community members. Nick Schnelle/Tribune.

“One square foot over the course of a season can produce several heads of lettuce, several pounds of carrots and several pounds of green onions,” Hargrove said.

By Caroline Dohack
Columbia Tribune
Sunday, March 20, 2016

Excerpt:

“You hear of gardeners during the summer leaving zucchini on neighbors’ doorsteps. It can come so fast and it can be hard to keep up with. It hurts to see that go to waste,” Hargrove said. “If you’re a good gardener or even just a kind-of-good gardener, you will get so much produce that you will want and need to share it. It might as well share with people who would really appreciate it.”

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March 25, 2016   Comments Off on Individuals, organizations grow fresh produce to donate to food pantries in Columbia, Missouri

In Dublin’s Inner-City, Ex-Offenders And Residents Grow A Community Garden Together

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To the right of the main centrepiece, a flower bed is filled with strawberry plants, though there’s no sign of fruit yet. This is just the start of what will be a food-producing community garden.

Betty O’Raw, a resident of O’Carroll Villas, is glad to see someone is finally caring for the space. Residents and ex-offenders maintain it together.

By Louisa Mcgrath
Dublin Inquirer
February 17, 2016

Excerpt:

This year, spring might look a bit different from the windows of O’Carroll Villas on Cuffe Street in the south inner-city. On a patch of land below, work will soon be underway on a new vegetable garden.

Last summer, residents of the council flats met with local city councillor Sonya Stapleton, who at the time was with People Before Profit but is now independent, and members of the Dublin-based charity Care After Prison (CAP), which helps rehabilitate ex-offenders.

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February 24, 2016   Comments Off on In Dublin’s Inner-City, Ex-Offenders And Residents Grow A Community Garden Together

Urban Agriculture Mentorship Program in Columbia, Missouri

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mentr
A family shows off their bountiful garden, built through the Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture’s Opportunity Garden program.

The garden mentorship program started three years ago with the mission of helping families and individuals with limited resources learn to grow their own fresh, healthful foods

By Caroline Dohack
Columbia Tribune
February 7, 2016 at 12:00 am

Excerpt:

“A lot of times, people want to be able to grow food but don’t know how to cook it. Other times, we give people plants they’ve never seen before and don’t know how to prepare. We’ve had a couple of mothers feeding up to five children before who want to learn how to prepare foods efficiently. Other people have never tried eggplant and don’t know what to do with it,” DeMarco said.

To date, CCUA has served 143 clients through Opportunity Gardens and usually serves between 80 to 100 clients at a given time. It currently has the capacity to accept as many as 45 new clients, DeMarco said.

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February 11, 2016   Comments Off on Urban Agriculture Mentorship Program in Columbia, Missouri

“Can You Dig This” – John Legend’s documentary about four “gangster gardeners”

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CAN YOU DIG THIS – Trailer from Delirio Films on Vimeo.

“When you put beauty in a place that has none, that’s a game changer.”
— Ron Finley, the “Gangster Gardener”

Delila Vallot – Director
Rafael Marmor – Producer
Christopher Leggett – Producer
John Legend – Executive Producer
2015
(Must see. Mike)

South Los Angeles. What comes to mind is gangs, drugs, liquor stores, abandoned buildings and vacant lots. The last thing that you would expect to find is a beautiful garden sprouting up through the concrete, coloring the urban landscape. As part of an urban gardening movement taking root in South LA, people are planting to transform their neighborhoods and are changing their own lives in the process. Calling for people to put down their guns and pick up their shovels, these “gangster gardeners” are creating an oasis in the middle of one of the most notoriously dangerous places in America.

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February 10, 2016   Comments Off on “Can You Dig This” – John Legend’s documentary about four “gangster gardeners”

Good Earth Collective, an New Zealand initiative which delivers home grown vegetables to needy families

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Yelena Bebich is happy to be sharing her garden’s vegetables with people in need. Photo by Emily Ford.

“It’s just very handy and fantastic for families to get good food. It’s healthy food straight from the garden,” Walker says.

By Emily Ford
Stuff.Co.nz
January 25 2016

Excerpt:

Run by Bebich and her sister, Tereza Bebich, the pair deliver vegetable boxes every week to families and charitable organisations.

It relies on fresh fruit and vegetables from Bebich’s garden, as well as regular donations from 10 growers – friends who put their hands up to help when she had extra seedlings.

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January 28, 2016   Comments Off on Good Earth Collective, an New Zealand initiative which delivers home grown vegetables to needy families