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Category — How to

Grow What You Eat, Eat What You Grow

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The Green Man’s Guide to Living & Eating Sustainably All Year Round

By Randy Shore
Arsenal Pulp Press
Sep 12 2014

Randy Shore’s father and grandfather grew up on farms, yet he didn’t even know how to grow a radish. Author of “The Green Man” column in the Vancouver Sun, he spent five years teaching himself how to grow food for his family, and then how to use the resulting bounty to create imaginative and nourishing meals the year round. In Grow What You Eat, Randy reveals the secrets to creating and maintaining a thriving vegetable garden, from how to make your own fertilizer to precise instructions on how best to grow specific produce; he also offers advice for those with balcony or container gardens and others who live in small urban spaces. He then shows how to showcase your bounty with delicious, nutrient-packed recipes (both vegetarian and not), including instructions on canning, pickling, and curing, proving how easy and fulfilling it is to be a self-reliant expert in your garden and your kitchen.

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February 10, 2016   No Comments

In Bengaluru, India, They Sow, Nurture and Colour the Yard Green

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Hariram Pagadala Sreenath started gardening at young but got engaged in the hustle-bustle Bengaluru lifestyle.

Vyas Sivanand gets four urban gardeners and organic farmers to share tips with beginners

By Vyas Sivanand
Indian Express
23rd January 2016

Excerpts:

Padma Kesari, a 49-year-old homemakre, lives in JP Nagar. After her two children went abroad for higher studies in 2013, she started her journey with gardening.

She has a piece of 5,600-sq ft residential plot in Sahakar Nagar, where she grows vegetables, fruits and flowers without pesticides or other chemicals. Her main objective is to keep the plot litter-free and address the concern of the food we eat and where it comes from. This is also her effort to retain the city’s green cover.

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January 30, 2016   No Comments

Building a Beehive for $60 in materials

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beh

The directions below detail construction of the hive’s base and inner and outer covers, plus five supers for collecting honey

By Cam Pauli
Modern Farmer
January 14, 2016

Excerpt:

Take advantage of winter downtime and start your beekeeping venture now, before the pollinators become available for delivery in early spring. Assuming you possess basic carpentry skills—and the tools that typically accompany them—this weekend project will set you back about $60 in materials (compared with $125 to $150 for a store-bought beehive).

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January 29, 2016   No Comments

Year-Round Indoor Salad Gardening

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How to Grow Nutrient-Dense, Soil-Sprouted Greens in Less Than 10 days

By Peter Burke
Chelsea Green Publishing
Date September 18, 2015

The Low-Tech, No-Grow-Lights Approach to Abundant Harvest

Year-Round Indoor Salad Gardening offers good news: with nothing more than a cupboard and a windowsill, you can grow all the fresh salad greens you need for the winter months (or throughout the entire year) with no lights, no pumps, and no greenhouse.

Longtime gardener Peter Burke was tired of the growing season ending with the first frost, but due to his busy work schedule and family life, didn’t have the time or interest in high-input grow lights or greenhouses. Most techniques for growing what are commonly referred to as “microgreens” left him feeling overwhelmed and uninterested. There had to be a simpler way to grow greens for his family indoors.

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October 23, 2015   Comments Off on Year-Round Indoor Salad Gardening

Graphics: Low Maintenance, Indoor Edibles

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Design agency, Ghergich & Co., teamed up with FIX to produce an article, with custom graphics, that explains how to grow edible plants indoors all season long

By Tafline Laylin
Fix.Com
Aug 18, 2015

Excerpt:

Indoor Growing Systems
For people who don’t have time or the green thumb to tend even a low-fuss garden indoors, there are great foolproof systems for growing food. From simple indoor hydroponics19 and vertical growing systems that maximize space to high-tech systems inspired by NASA,20 a number of new products afford busy urbanites an opportunity to enjoy fresh food grown at home without having to do any of the work.

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October 13, 2015   Comments Off on Graphics: Low Maintenance, Indoor Edibles

Making Grape Juice at City Farmer

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grpjuice

Green grapes with seeds grow next to our garden gate

By Bronywn Smyth
City Farmer
Sept. 2015

1. Rinse and de-stem grapes. Remove any bad grapes (e.g. moldy).
2. Place grapes in a large pot. Use a potato masher and mash grapes, bruising them so that the grapes start to release their juices.
3. Place on stove over medium heat. Bring to a simmer and simmer for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally to keep the grapes from burning on the bottom of the pot. Grape skins will start to make their way to the surface.
4. Remove from heat. Use the potato masher to help the grapes release more juice.

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September 19, 2015   Comments Off on Making Grape Juice at City Farmer

Indoor Kitchen Gardening

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Turn Your Home Into a Year-round Vegetable Garden – Microgreens – Sprouts – Herbs – Mushrooms – Tomatoes, Peppers & More

By Elizabeth Millard
Cool Springs Press
June 15 2014

It takes just a few dollars and a few days for you to start enjoying fresh, healthy produce grown indoors in your own home. Imagine serving a home-cooked meal highlighted with beet, arugula, and broccoli microgreens grown right in your kitchen, accompanied by sautéed winecap mushrooms grown in a box of sawdust in your basement.

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May 25, 2015   Comments Off on Indoor Kitchen Gardening

Ori: Handmade tool from Slovenia to help you determine growing spaces between the plants

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The holes and the legend on Ori will guide your sowing and planting experience.

By Seed Guardians Association; Origo Co-op
2015

Excerpt:

The main purpose in the use of Ori is to help you determine growing spaces between the plants on your gardening surface. It can be considered as a gardening ruler with a twist of design.

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May 16, 2015   Comments Off on Ori: Handmade tool from Slovenia to help you determine growing spaces between the plants

Will Bonsall’s Essential Guide to Radical, Self-Reliant Gardening

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Innovative Techniques for Growing Vegetables, Grains, and Perennial Food Crops with Minimal Fossil Fuel and Animal Inputs

By Will Bonsall
Chelsea Green Publishing
Release Date: June 3, 2015

Will Bonsall has worn many hats before and since going “back to the land,” including prospector, draftsman, gravedigger, hobo, musician, logger, and artist, among others; however, he considers subsistence farming to be the only true career he ever had. He is the director of the Scatterseed Project, which he founded to help preserve our endangered crop-plant diversity. His first book, Through the Eyes of a Stranger (Xlibris, 2010), is an eco-novel set in a sustainable society of the future. Will lives and farms in Industry, Maine, with his wife, Molly Thorkildsen, and two sons.

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April 30, 2015   Comments Off on Will Bonsall’s Essential Guide to Radical, Self-Reliant Gardening

Forthcoming book: ‘The Urban Farmer’

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British Columbia author: Growing Food for Profit on Leased and Borrowed Land

By Curtis Stone
New Society Publishers
Pub. Date: 2015-11-01

The Urban Farmer is a comprehensive, hands-on, practical manual to help you learn the techniques and business strategies you need to make a good living growing high-yield, high-value crops right in your own backyard (or someone else’s). Major benefits include:

Low capital investment and overhead costs
Reduced need for expensive infrastructure
Easy access to markets.

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April 29, 2015   Comments Off on Forthcoming book: ‘The Urban Farmer’

1909: ‘The Vegetable Garden’

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hotbed Temporary hotbeds in a city backyard. For larger image click on picture.

“Did we cultivate more assiduously our backyard gardens, those of us whose daily grind chains us fast to a bell or whistle or even an office clock, there would be fewer nervous breakdowns.”

By Ida D. Bennett
Doubleday, Page and Co.
1909

Excerpt:

There are certain plant-poisons – herbicides – on the market which it is claimed will kill out scrub oak, burdock, Canada thistle, and like persistent perennial growths … It is considerations like this which make the growing of one’s own kitchen vegetables so desirable,

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April 27, 2015   Comments Off on 1909: ‘The Vegetable Garden’

Canning, Pickling, and Freezing with Irma Harding

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irma

Readers are guided through the book by Irma Harding, a fictional spokesperson for appliances produced by International Harvester during the 1950s.

By Marilyn McCray
Octane Press
2014

Urban farmers, foodies, and cooking enthusiasts of all ages are taking matters into their own hands when it comes to food preservation. For those wanting to preserve garden-fresh vegetables at home, Canning, Pickling and Freezing with Irma Hardingoffers modern techniques and tasty recipes from heartland farms.

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April 25, 2015   Comments Off on Canning, Pickling, and Freezing with Irma Harding

How to Become an Urban Farmer in Asheville, North Carolina

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Urban farmer Sunil Patel (left) partnered with restaurateur Charlie Hodge to bring a “farm to glass” experience to Sovereign Remedies cocktail lounge. Photo by Cindy Kunst.

One of the first steps in the process is determining what you want to farm and where.

By Josh O’Conner
Mountain Express
March 19, 2015

Excerpt:

Among the many steps to tackling any urban farming venture is a mastering of the permitting requirements. Regulations may govern everything from structures, such as greenhouses or storage sheds, to permits on each type of animal being raised to enclosure inspections by animal control. Deed restrictions or homeowners association rules may also come into play, and, if you’re thinking about opening your farm to visitors, parking may even become an issue.

Before engaging in any urban farming adventures, it’s best to run your plans by your local government to make sure you aren’t going to run afoul of any land-use or animal control regulations.

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March 31, 2015   Comments Off on How to Become an Urban Farmer in Asheville, North Carolina

‘Crates to Plates Garden’ In Columbia, Missouri

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crates
Outside of Lucky’s Market in Columbia you will find dozens of milk crates filled with vegetables and plants.

For eight-weeks during the summer, low income high school students will be employed to attend garden based classes

By Courtny Jodon
Connect Missouri
Mar 15, 2015

Excerpt:

Outside of Lucky’s Market in Columbia you will find dozens of milk crates filled with vegetables and plants.

Saturday, it hosted the first-ever Crates to Plates Garden work day. During this work day, volunteers in the community lined milk crates, filled them with soil and planted the garden’s first seeds. Members of the Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture helped volunteers install the milk crate garden.

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March 27, 2015   Comments Off on ‘Crates to Plates Garden’ In Columbia, Missouri

Six designs for urban agriculture products, including a two-hen chicken coop, a raised planter bed, and a multi-story worm hotel

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Build your own using open-source designs by Aker

By Ben Schiller
Fast Co-exist
Mar 13, 2015

Excerpt:

Open source product development started with software. Now it’s spreading to hardware as well. Projects like WikiSpeed and WikiHouse show how distributed groups of people can refine new designs and create products with no decisive owner.

Another example of the trend: a new Denver-based company called Aker (pronounced “acre”). Aker has six new designs for urban agriculture products, including a two-hen chicken coop, a raised planter bed, and a multi-story worm hotel, and it’s prepared to give them away for free so people can develop their own versions. You can download the blueprints from the Aker website, cut your own pieces of wood using a CNC routing machine, and assemble yourself, just as if it were an IKEA product. It won’t cost you much more than the price of plywood.

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March 23, 2015   Comments Off on Six designs for urban agriculture products, including a two-hen chicken coop, a raised planter bed, and a multi-story worm hotel