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Category — Hydroponics

Meet the budding hydroponic farmer feeding George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia

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Donielle Nolan, Greenhouse and Gardens Specialist, Office of Sustainability. Photo by Evan Cantwell.

In its first year, the Greenhouse supplied Mason’s kitchens with 1,400 pounds of greens, valued at $14,400.

By Buzz McClain
George Mason University
Mar 15, 2017

Excerpt:

The hydroponic garden Nolan oversees conforms to the certified standards required by Mason’s food service provider, Sodexo, to be an official vendor of fresh produce for use in Mason kitchens. In its first year, the Greenhouse supplied Mason’s kitchens with 1,400 pounds of greens, valued at $14,400.

“The goal is 2,000 pounds a year,” Nolan said. That would be valued at $20,000.

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March 16, 2017   No Comments

Chicago Students Learn To Be Hydroponic Urban Farmers at Schurz Food Science Lab

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The chef and marketing executive’s idea for a high school urban farming program started as a way to prove a restaurant concept.

By Erica Gunderson
WTTW
March 9, 2017

Excerpt:

Friedman: Yields from the Food Lab are often large enough to allow the program to donate herbs and microgreens to a nearby food pantry. And like any farm, increasing yields is a constant focus –whether it’s by adjusting light or fertilizer, testing different grow media or developing a prototype for a rotating growing system. For senior Nathaniel Colon, working in the Food Lab has allowed him to apply some of the problem-solving techniques he’s learned in his pre-engineering classes.

Nathaniel Colon, Schurz senior: We thought of a triangle system that would have different layers. It would be a mist system, it would have LEDs under the trays, so you can access it easier. There’ll be a pipe coming through the middle so it can all recycle back to the reservoir.

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March 16, 2017   No Comments

Bright Farms Hydroponic Greenhouses Move From Urban Farming to Suburban Farming

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After dealing with the high costs and logistical nightmares of developing in urban areas, Bright Farms realized that they could streamline their process by moving just a bit outside the city limits.

By Adele Peters
FastCoexist
Mar 2, 2017

Excerpt:

BrightFarms also has greenhouses in Bucks County, Pennsylvania; Culpeper County, Virginia; and Rochelle, Illinois—all also near, but not in, large cities. The new strategy lets the company avoid the costs and challenges of working on urban sites, while still providing a local version of foods like salad greens that would normally travel thousands of miles.

“Like most good strategies, it was driven by some painful experiences,” Paul Lightfoot, CEO of BrightFarms, tells Co.Exist. “Basically, we had a couple of failures. We tried to develop a giant rooftop of a building in Sunset Park, Brooklyn, and we also tried to develop an environmentally soiled parcel of land in the city of Washington D.C., owned by the city.”

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March 8, 2017   Comments Off on Bright Farms Hydroponic Greenhouses Move From Urban Farming to Suburban Farming

“Father of Vertical Farming,” Dr. Toyoki Kozai Says ‘Future Promising’

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ICCEA 2017: Dr. Toyoki Kozai’s take on vertical farming.

The most fulfilling project for the next generation of vertical farms is the online estimation of rates of photosynthesis, transpiration (water uptake) and respiration in vertical farms.

By Patrick Williams
Produce Grower
Mar 2, 2016
(Must see. Mike)

Excerpts:

PG: What does the future look like for vertical farming?

TK: It is promising. Commercialization of vertical farms started in Asian countries such as Japan and Taiwan since 2010. It is going to be started in the Netherlands this year. Russia has a strong interest in the vertical farming business.

Commercialization of strawberry production in vertical farms started in Japan two years ago. Commercialization of high-wire cherry tomato production has been considered in the Netherlands. Many private companies are interested in the production of medicinal plants in vertical farms.

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March 3, 2017   Comments Off on “Father of Vertical Farming,” Dr. Toyoki Kozai Says ‘Future Promising’

Vertical Farming: Does it Stack Up

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Video published on Feb 28, 2017. Writer:Sam Lemonick. Narrator/Scientific Consultant: Darcy Gentleman, Ph.D.

If vertical farming is so great, why isn’t everyone adopting it? Vertical farming has its challenges.

By David Latchman
ChemMatters
Oct/Nov 2016

Excerpt:

Open-field agriculture relies entirely on energy from the sun, so, when it is available, this source of energy is free. Crops grown indoors receive their energy from artificial light sources, which rely on electricity.

Another issue is that the artificial light sources, called grow lamps, emit heat, which can damage plants if they are placed too close to the plants. So the plants need to be spread out, and the indoor space needs to be cooled to compensate for the added heat from the lamps.

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March 2, 2017   Comments Off on Vertical Farming: Does it Stack Up

The view from inside Square Roots’ urban shipping container farms in Brooklyn

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Arugula and mustard greens from Square Roots’ first harvest were on sale for $5 a bag. (Photo by April Joyner)

A month ago, Square Roots, the urban farming accelerator launched by Kimbal Musk and Tobias Peggs, began its yearlong program in the Pfizer Building

By April Joyner
Technically Brooklyn
Dec 19, 2016

Excerpt:

The farmer-entrepreneurs have been given free rein to develop farming and business strategies of their own choosing. The challenge, both Peggs and the program’s participants stressed, is figuring out how to make the economics work. The modular farms, which use technology from Boston-based Freight Farms and Laramie, Wyo.–based Bright Agrotech, cost about $3,000 a month to run, according to participant Jonathan Bernard. But they also produce a relatively high yield, given the space: one farm, for instance, could yield 55,000 mini-heads of lettuce per year, Peggs said. The farming system Square Roots uses allows the participants to yield a weekly harvest once their first crop matures.

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December 27, 2016   Comments Off on The view from inside Square Roots’ urban shipping container farms in Brooklyn

Rooftop hydroponic systems in cities produce vegetables that are cheaper and healthier than rural farms

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Putting roots down on rooftops. (Reuters/Vincent Kessler)

After calculating the cost of building the screenhouse and tanks, rent, labor, utilities, seeds, fertilizer, and other equipment, the team from the Chinese Academy of Sciences South China Botanical Garden and the Zhong Kai University of Agriculture and Engineering found that six out of the seven vegetables were cheaper to produce than to purchase at a local store.

By Kelsey Lindsey
Quartz
Dec 14

Excerpt:

On a 1,600-square-foot-rooftop in Guangzhou, China, 14 hydroponic tanks produce hundreds of pounds of vegetables a year, with a potential profit of over $6,000 annually—almost twice the 2015 annual minimum wage in the city, which has one of the highest monthly minimum wages in the country. The hydroponic tanks are part of study that shows residents and developers in Guangzhou that their rooftop space might be worth some green.

A paper published this past July the journal Agronomy for Sustainable Development reports that growing leafy greens in rooftop hydroponic systems can not only produce a steady supply of vegetables—it can also be cheaper than buying store-bought alternatives.

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December 15, 2016   Comments Off on Rooftop hydroponic systems in cities produce vegetables that are cheaper and healthier than rural farms

SproutsIO – Growing Personal Produce

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The system is modular, enabling a grower to have one or multiple devices controlled seamlessly through the SproutsIOGrow mobile app.

From their website:

The SproutsIO device is the home of your microgarden, designed to monitor and nurture your produce. The device is equipped with WiFi connectivity, environmental sensors for monitoring both plant and ambient conditions, camera, high efficiency LED lighting, and an electronic mister. The thoughtful design allows for ease of use and maintenance wherever you live, work, and play.

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December 9, 2016   Comments Off on SproutsIO – Growing Personal Produce

High-tech agriculture blossoms in the city of St Petersburg, Florida at Brick Street Farms

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stp
Owners Bradley Doyle and Shannon O’Malley in front of their Brick Street Farms. Photo by Todd Bates.

In Farm 1, which has a sweet scent and can be as cold as 60 degrees, there’s Red Cross Butterhead, Rex lettuce (an ideal hydroponic similar to butterhead), heirloom Vulcan lettuce (for all you Star Trek fans) and arugula, to name a few.

By Meaghan Habuda
Creative Loafing
Nov 18, 2016

Excerpt:

The indoor hydroponic farm, owned by wife-and-husband duo Shannon O’Malley and Bradley Doyle, doesn’t look like much from the outside. But spread out over green upcycled freight containers, planted inside a wooden fence that surrounds the former site of an abandoned junkyard at 2001 Second Ave. S., Brick Street has spent close to a year quietly blossoming in St. Petersburg.

What makes up this city farm’s local, vertically grown bounty? Herbs and leafy greens.

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November 26, 2016   Comments Off on High-tech agriculture blossoms in the city of St Petersburg, Florida at Brick Street Farms

One Palestinian man’s mission to make urban agriculture more sustainable

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This video was produced, filmed and edited by Yasser Abu Wazna, a freelance filmmaker based in the Palestinian Territory.

He produces approximately 3,500 kilograms (7,716 pounds) of food — enough to feed 30 people.

By Todd Reubold
Ensia
Nov 22, 2016
(Must see. Mike.)

Around the world, urban agriculture is playing a role in feeding a growing global population from mid-America to the Middle East. This video introduces Said Salim Abu Naser, a proponent of sustainable agriculture living and working in Gaza City, Palestine along the Mediterranean Coast.

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November 23, 2016   Comments Off on One Palestinian man’s mission to make urban agriculture more sustainable

The Smart Garden – on Kickstarter

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The Smart Garden 9 is a meticulously designed, self-growing garden that revolutionizes how fresh food is grown.

From Kickstarter site.
Nov 17, 2016

Excerpts:

From crisp kale and spicy chilli to sweet strawberry and calming mint, this self-growing garden helps all plants thrive, automatically making sure they have the right amounts of water, light, oxygen, and nutrients. With healthy foods grown right on your windowsill, you can enjoy a higher quality of life 24/7.

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November 17, 2016   Comments Off on The Smart Garden – on Kickstarter

Press releases: Urban agriculture “serving the fast growing legal cannabis industry”

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marj

PureAgro Creates Largest U.S. Supplier of Urban Agriculture and Hydroponics Tech and Equipment and ARCTURUS Begins Construction Roll Out For Rhode Island Urban Farm

Press Releases
Nov 2

Excerpts:

Arcturus Growthstar Technologies Inc. Rhode Island also has Medical Marijuana laws that allow urban farms such as ours to make build out designated areas to cultivate cannabis for medical purposes.

We are excited to have Jim Coull and his team of construction professionals on board with us in the development and construction of our Rhode Island farm, which can grow both leafy greens as well as cannabis,” says Mr. William Gildea, Arcturus Growthstar Technologies, Inc.’s CEO and Chairman.

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November 9, 2016   Comments Off on Press releases: Urban agriculture “serving the fast growing legal cannabis industry”

‘Veggielante’ helps folks grow food in small spaces in Sacramento

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sacres

Con10u2Farm.com puts modules in schools to encourage gardens in city neighborhoods

By Cathie Anderson
Sacramento Bee
June 18, 2016

Excerpt:

Friends tease James Brady about his devotion to urban farming, calling him a veggielante and a veggie preacher, but that doesn’t stop his proselytizing. Brady and his business partners create microscale systems that allow schoolchildren and others to grow produce in small or nontraditional spaces.

They recently sold nine of their “adaptive growing modules” to Sacramento-area schools such as Luther Burbank High School, John Still and Pasadena Avenue Elementary School. The modules consist of raised storage bins hooked up to a recirculating water system and filled with a composted growing medium. A timer, which can be powered by solar energy, turns the drip system on and off as directed.

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October 25, 2016   Comments Off on ‘Veggielante’ helps folks grow food in small spaces in Sacramento

London: An Experimental Farm on the River Thames Is Changing the Way City-Dwellers Eat

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farpol Click on image for larger file.

On a jetty jutting into the River Thames, they’ve founded Farmopolis, a space to explore how this could work. The project forms the beginnings of a social, technological, and agricultural prototype for urban farming.

By Johanna Derry
VICE
Oct 3, 2016

Excerpt:

Farmopolis is a project that’s been several years in the making and is still in its early days. Ring is a landscape architect and founder of Wayward, the practice behind projects like the Helsinki Plant Tram, a mobile garden, and the Union Street Orchard, a pop-up forest in south London.

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October 10, 2016   Comments Off on London: An Experimental Farm on the River Thames Is Changing the Way City-Dwellers Eat

A Wall Farm For Your Office

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This timelapse was filmed during 20 days in an office.

It’s nanotech growing material is engineered to supply plants the right amount of oxygen, water and nutrients at all times.

From their press release:

Palo Alto, Calif. – September 28, 2016 – Click & Grow’s Wall Farm line, a combination of a fully automated 57-plant, indoor smart garden, and a semi-automatic watering, 38-plant, indoor smart garden, is now available for purchase and is currently the most affordable on the market. The Wall Farm line will easily add fresh food to users’ diets and features Click & Grow’s proprietary NASA-inspired technology that takes the guesswork out of growing plants.

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September 28, 2016   Comments Off on A Wall Farm For Your Office