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India: IT professionals working in Hi-Tech city learn about farming

IT professionals at the land they purchased at Naskal village, 13 km. from Vikarabad.

The concept was given the name ‘urban farming’ as educated urban youth were involved in an activity that had to do with rural areas.

By N. Rahul
Hindu
Jan 21, 2018

Excerpt:

About 30 permanent members of the group and two promoters who were themselves ex-IT employees have pooled their money and purchased 50 acres of land in two locations where the activity has been going on since September last. Farming is done here by drip irrigation from bore wells to cultivate fig (anjeer) and thai guava, both of which have a crop duration of 15 years each but start yielding income from the second year. There is also inter-cropping of seasonal vegetables to enhance the hands on experience of the participants.

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January 27, 2018   Comments Off on India: IT professionals working in Hi-Tech city learn about farming

India: Urban agriculture is one of the major components of “Livable Cities India” project

Urban agriculture program, is now included in “Samrudhi, General Education Protection Mission Project of Government of Kerala”, and is being implemented in 49 schools of Ollur assembly constituency, in one of the districts of the state.

World Urban Campaign
Evangelical Social Action Forum (ESAF)
Technical support of HealthBridge, Canada.
2018

Excerpt:

Promoting Herbal Garden in Schools

The schools in the assembly constituency started implementing Herbal gardens within their school complexes, to popularize the usefulness of commonly available and frequently used herbal plants and to conserve the associated traditional knowledge for future generations.

I Walk Club students are entrusted with the maintenance and supervision of Herbal gardens in the respective schools. So far, 13 out of 49 schools have already implemented herbal gardens in their respective school yard, which involves approximately 413 students.

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January 25, 2018   Comments Off on India: Urban agriculture is one of the major components of “Livable Cities India” project

India: Seminar on promoting spice farming in cities

Black Pepper Plant.

Farmers participating in the seminar will be provided with technologies for growing spices such as black pepper, ginger, turmeric, chilli, coriander, mint, curry leaf, cinnamon, clove, nutmeg, and garcinia on terraces/front yards

Staff reporter
The Hindu
Jan 4, 2018

Excerpt:

The Kerala Agricultural University (KAU) is organising a two-day seminar on ‘Spices for urban horticulture’ to equip the urban/periurban population produce safe-to-eat spices.

The move assumes significance in the wake of reports on excessive pesticide residue in spices and condiments procured from the market.

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January 12, 2018   Comments Off on India: Seminar on promoting spice farming in cities

India: Startups reaping dividends in urban farms

The urban farming startup ecosystem could be worth $1billion in India in the next two to four years and will become essential due to environmental concerns

By Shashwati Shankar
Economic Times India
Jan 5, 2018

Excerpt:

In the past three to four years, more than a dozen urban farming startups have been launched in Mumbai, Delhi, Bengaluru, Jaipur and elsewhere. They provide services such as setting up rooftop and balcony farms for independent homes and companies to vertical farming options for those with more wall space than floor area.

“I began with conducting farming and gardening workshops but in the last one or two years we have seen interest significantly increase,” said Kapil Mandawewala, founder of Edible Routes. “I get about 30 orders a month, with a majority coming from independent homes and the rest from community centres, educational institutions or corporates.” Edible Routes was registered in 2016 but was operational in the urban farming space for three years prior to that. Mandawewala began experimenting with farming on family owned land in Gujarat in 2008.

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January 10, 2018   Comments Off on India: Startups reaping dividends in urban farms

Northern India: Meet Gurgaon’s urban farmers

Shikha Gaur is a corporate event planner and prefers her self grown fresh vegetables and fruits over the market’s produce (BCCL/ Ajay Kumar Gautam)

These urban farmers say that over the months, their farms have become so productive that they are now reaping about 20kg of fruits and vegetables every week.

By Abhimanyu Mathur
Times of India
Dec 19, 2017

Excerpt:

Dheeraj Garg is an IT professional and like many other professionals, despite a busy work life, he finds time to engage in a ‘hobby’ every weekend. Every Sunday, Dheeraj drives to Badshahpur on the outskirts of the city, where he – along with over a hundred other Gurugrammers – works as a farmer in his own farm, growing everything, from tomatoes and strawberries. Community organic farming is finding popularity among the working class of the Millennium City, who are not averse to getting their hands dirty in the mud and engage in farming. Currently, over 100 families from across the city are engaged in the practice on leased farms in Badshahpur in a project started by the District Horticulture Department and supported by a local NGO, Green Leaf Initiative.

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December 27, 2017   Comments Off on Northern India: Meet Gurgaon’s urban farmers

India: Kochi school auctions organic produce to encourage farming

The school auctions the produce from its terrace farm among teachers and reinvest the earning back into farming

Times of India
Dec 12, 2017

Excerpt:

The project was initiated in August and the school has so far held five such auctions. School authorities suggest that the farm produce often gets auctioned entirely for around Rs 2,000 every alternate week.

“We had the space to undertake the terrace farming project. Once we proposed this idea, the school assured full support. Right now, we have around 200 grow bags on the terrace, where we farm vegetables such as okra, eggplant, tomatoes, bitter gourd and cauliflowers.

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December 20, 2017   Comments Off on India: Kochi school auctions organic produce to encourage farming

India: Now, grow vegetables in your living room with this self-watering modular farm

“Our goal is to make families around the world self-reliant with respect to food and Altifarm is our first product. All our learning from multiple projects at my industrial design studio over the last eight years has been distilled into development of Altifarm,” shares Raj.

By Chhavi Tyagi
Economic Times
Dec 4, 2017

Excerpt:

Ergonomically-designed, Altifarm comes across as a one-stop solution for all constraints related to urban farming – space, time, and erratic lifestyle. Consisting of 3 or 4 tiers (depending on your preference), Altifarm provides 1sqm of space to farm while utilising only as much of footprint as a chair does. The shelves are height-adjustable, giving you the freedom to choose a variety of saplings. The farm is designed with a wall hugging rear and is fitted with wheels to provide mobility.

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December 13, 2017   Comments Off on India: Now, grow vegetables in your living room with this self-watering modular farm

India: Woman sets example for locals by introducing terrace farming in Raipur


Video in native language.

The Times of India
Published on Nov 22, 2017

Raipur (Chhattisgarh), Nov 23 (ANI): A woman named Pushpa Sahu is setting an example with her unconventional way of farming on her home’s rooftop in Raipur. Pushpa has set up a unique method of farming by using waste from her house to grow fruits, vegetables and even medicinal plants. She has converted the rooftop into a mini farm and has also uses a technique to water the plants by recycled water. She started terrace farming five years ago and is also influencing people in the city to take up this unique initiative.

November 29, 2017   Comments Off on India: Woman sets example for locals by introducing terrace farming in Raipur

India: Chennai mini urban-rural joint venture

Their first crop — the red diamonds, a native rice grain called poongar.

Till the 1960s Indian farmers had close to a 100,000 varieties of rice

Excerpt:

The Valam collective is one of several mini urban-rural joint ventures cropping up across TN, which not only encourage organic farming and give city-dwellers a chance to explore their entrepreneurial side, but also help rural farmers who are in dire straits financially.

Since January, Gopinath Jayaraja and his coterie of city farmers have harvested three tonnes of this precious commodity. Incidentally, it has also made his idli-dosa batter taste spectacular.

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November 17, 2017   Comments Off on India: Chennai mini urban-rural joint venture

India: Pune Woman Converts 3,500sqft Plot Into A Garden Which Feeds 10-12 People Daily

Sujata cuts a 2-feet-long white gourd in her urban farm as her sister-in-law and nephew watch.

I spend about one hour daily on the plot and about 20 minutes on the terrace garden. There are three families – mine, my brother’s and my brother-in-law’s.

The Logical Indian Crew
November 8th, 2017

Excerpt:

Sujata: It is not exactly a farm, it’s a residential plot which we have converted into a garden. We did not want to construct on the plot, which belonged to my brother-in-Law, so with his permission we converted it into the garden as it was lying idle. We always wanted to grow plants using only organic and natural method. We are also maintaining a terrace garden for last 6-7 years, but it has its own limitation of space. This problem was solved by the garden.

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November 13, 2017   Comments Off on India: Pune Woman Converts 3,500sqft Plot Into A Garden Which Feeds 10-12 People Daily

India: More residents learning to grow their own food

“Every apartment has a different microclimate; within each apartment, each room may have a different microclimate.

By Anjana Vaswani and Vijayeta Basu
Mumbai Mirror
Sep 24, 2017

Excerpt:

The Ghias, the Mahimkars and the Kadams represent a new tribe: urban farmers who are using whatever space they have available to create pretty, leafy corners, that produce at least some of what their families consume. Preeti Patil who conducts ‘compost your kitchen waste’ workshops through her eight-year old company Urban Leaves, a collaboration of urban farming enthusi asts, confirms the rise of this new breed. “From only wanting to grow decorative flowering plants, people are now eager to learn how to grow their own produce to ensure they’re eating healthy, and there’s also a visible shift towards adopting sustainable living practices,” says Patil whose first project, a terrace farm at the Mumbai Port Trust has grown into a sprawling food forest in 17 years.

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September 29, 2017   Comments Off on India: More residents learning to grow their own food

India: Students create organic vegetable garden in school

Students and teachers of Marudhamalai Devasthanam Higher Secondary School, Vadavalli, at their organic vegetable garden on school premises. Click image to see larger file.

Sharing their experience, the students said that the farming taught them the hardships of farmers and motivated them to contribute their part to society.

By S. Pavith Valsel
The Hindu
Sept 7, 2017

Excerpt:

Started in June, the students cultivate spinach, tomato, ladies finger, pumpkin, bottle guard, coriander and lettuce among others in the organic vegetable garden. They do mixed cropping and crop rotation to retain the fertility of the soil.

Produces of the vegetable garden are used to provide lunch for the students. There has been days when students were able to take home their produces too.

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September 18, 2017   Comments Off on India: Students create organic vegetable garden in school

India: Techie gives up career to promote apartment farming, toxin-free food

Patel admits a lack of space in cities is often a hurdle that stops many residents from growing their own food.

By Aishwarya Upadhye
Times of India
Aug 24, 2017

Excerpt:

“I tell participants why it’s important to grow their own food. They are also given information on different types of soil and the various types of saplings. The training then, makes up the basic rules of organic farming. At the end of the workshop, each participant is handed compost full of essential microbes which are responsible for preparing manure from kitchen waste. The kit encourages them to take the first step,” he says.

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September 2, 2017   Comments Off on India: Techie gives up career to promote apartment farming, toxin-free food

India: Hyderabad Government campaign intends to encourage the citizens in twin cities to adopt Urban Farming

“The potential capacity to produce more than 50 lakh kg vegetables and fruits by the households in twin cities and in the suburban areas should be garnered by adopting urban farming,” he averred

By VRC Phaniharan
The Hans India
Aug 19,2017

Excerpt:

The Telangana Horticulture Department is all set to launch a unique campaign to increase the green cover as well as provide organic vegetables daily to the city residents.

Dubbed as ‘Own and Produce Your Oxygen’, the mass awareness campaign intends to encourage the citizens in twin cities to adopt Urban Farming.

Explaining the twin benefits from the programme, Horticulture Department Commissioner L Venkatrami Reddy said the city has been witnessing increase in pollution affecting the health of people.

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August 25, 2017   Comments Off on India: Hyderabad Government campaign intends to encourage the citizens in twin cities to adopt Urban Farming

What stops Indian cities from growing their own food?

India’s 377-million urban population is expected to grow by another 300 million by 2050 and yet, agricultural land is rapidly shrinking in urban areas, leaving city dwellers increasingly reliant on rural farmers for meeting their sustenance requirements.

Navya P K
Citizen Matters
Aug 1, 2017

Excerpt:

Despite adverse conditions, some farmer groups have thrived. The Yamuna bank farmers, who are not legally acknowledged at all, have been farming and selling their produce in Delhi markets for generations. In Cuttack, slum residents do farming to produce food for themselves, and sell the surplus in local markets. In 2009 in Mumbai, a charitable Trust helped the residents of Ambedkar Nagar slum clean up a garbage dump near their homes and convert it into a community farm.

These, however, largely constitute individual and sporadic successes rather than a systematic, sustained development of urban agriculture. India’s governments have been largely ignoring the issues faced by urban farmers, while continuing to promote household-level gardening.

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August 6, 2017   Comments Off on What stops Indian cities from growing their own food?