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Category — India

India: This startup bringing organic farming to your rooftop

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Reddy launched Homecrop in January this year with an initial investment of just 5 lakh rupees. Ideation took a year under the guidance of National Academy of Agricultural Research Management (NAARM)’s incubator a-IDEA.

By Shilpa S Ranipeta
The News Minute
March 14, 2017

Excerpt:

This is where 26-year old Manvitha Reddy stepped in to start Homecrop – a startup that helps you grow pesticide-free vegetables at home. Reddy has designed rooftop and backyard kits that have everything you need to make your own farm at home.

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March 22, 2017   No Comments

India: Organic Vegetable Terrace Garden Book

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Of course low cost and easy to do…

By Sandeep Chavan
BookGanga

From Introduction:

“Author himself is working on Urban Terrace Garden issues since last 8 years. He has done many experiments in terrace garden issue. He has developed a terrace garden at his present residence. He promotes alternate ways of life, spinning on Amber Spinning Wheel (Charka), Waste Management, Solar Energy, Learning out of School and believes on Walk on the Talk!”

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March 19, 2017   No Comments

India: Two Ranchi women turn rooftops into organic farm

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Fifty-year-old Shobha Kumari doesn’t need to visit the market to buy vegetables anymore. All she does is climb up to her terrace and pick some.

Krishna’s rooftop garden spreads across 5,000sqft, which she had reared with equal love and dedication for the past eight years.

Times of India
Mar 11, 2017

Excerpt:

“A few days ago, I had grown 2.5kg beans. This apart, my terrace has tomatoes, chillies, brinjals, coriander leaves and other vegetables. I also grow oranges, guavas, litchis, pomegranates and strawberries, besides roses and marigold. I have altogether 250 pots,” said a very proud Shobha, whose rooftop garden sprawls across 2,500sqft.

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March 13, 2017   No Comments

India: Urban Planner Based in Bhubaneswar Encourages Agriculture In Cities

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Bhubaneswar is India’s temple city. Bhubaneswar literary means the land of Shiva. Gauda King Sashanka, who was a staunch follower of Lord Shiva, had built the first temple at Bhubaneswar (Ekamra Kshetra) in the 7th century AD.

India has a massive population of 1.3 billion, second only to China, and one-fifth of people in the country live in poverty. They need to be fed one way or the other. Urban farming is the answer to this need.

By Piyush Ranjan Rout
Orissa Post
Feb 7, 2017

Excerpts:

In the past few years Bhubaneswar has witnessed a heightened interest in urban agriculture. It is being bolstered by new approaches to urban planning and development that emphasise diffused, informal, community-based initiatives, open space, green space and soft-edge interventions in place of a centralised master plan that ignores urban farming.

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February 11, 2017   Comments Off on India: Urban Planner Based in Bhubaneswar Encourages Agriculture In Cities

India: Agrarian Freedom in Madurai’s Urban Agriculture

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Figure 1. Flooded rice paddy and coconut grove outside of Madurai. Photo by author.

Bowdoin Senior Receives Award for India Research

By Jeb Polstein
Bowdoin College
Program: South India Term Abroad

Excerpt from Bowdoin News about Jeb’s project:

While he was studying away in India last year, Jacob “Jeb” Polstein ’17 researched the rise of urban agriculture in the city of Madurai.

Using ethnographic data he collected from three sites around the city, Polstein looked at how the capitalistic promotion of urban agricultural movements has complicated traditional agrarian ideas and practices. At Bowdoin, Polstein is majoring in philosophy and environmental studies.

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January 24, 2017   Comments Off on India: Agrarian Freedom in Madurai’s Urban Agriculture

Bengaluru’s oldest urban farmer leads the way in sustainable living

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Anusuya Sharma’s terrace farm grows everything from leafy veggies to medicinal plants and herbs.

“The fresh chemical-free vegetables grown at home reduces my family’s carbon foot print, a core issue in global warming,” Anusuya says.

By Theja Ram
The News Minute
Jan 14, 2017

Excerpt:

“When I got married, I moved to Bombay. There were no plants in peoples’ homes and barely any space to live. I still nurtured a few plants on the balcony of our rented home. After 13 years, we moved to Hyderabad and the situation there was the opposite of Bombay. Almost every home there had a kitchen garden. I brought a few pots and began cultivating plants,” said Anusuya.

Anusuya and her family moved to Bengaluru in 1987 and it was at the city’s famous Lalbagh that the veteran farmer learned the intricacies of urban agriculture.

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January 20, 2017   Comments Off on Bengaluru’s oldest urban farmer leads the way in sustainable living

Terrace gardener in Bengaluru, India

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terr
Click on image for larger file.

Kiran grows custard apple, rose apple, water apple, jamun, passion fruit, fig, yellow and red dragon fruits, grapes, papaya, carambola (star fruit), avocado, banana, orange, lemon, sapota (sapodilla), pomegranate, apple ber, guava and five varieties of cherry.

By Seema S Hegde
Deccan Herald
Nov 18, 2016

Excerpt:

Meet Kiran C Pattar. A believer in unconventional education, he has been practising terrace gardening for the past seven years. Kiran has a garden of about 400 square feet on his terrace, where he grows 25 varieties of fruits. He uses empty paint buckets and large containers to grow fruits and vegetables. He has also constructed beds for the plants using bricks, all by himself. Since he believes in the “do it yourself” attitude, he started to build the brick structures on his own and completed them successfully. He says, “It was really a fulfilling experience, although it took me quite a lot of time to complete.”

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December 6, 2016   Comments Off on Terrace gardener in Bengaluru, India

India: Bengaluru city slickers cultivate farming habits in vacant plots

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bagvac Vacant land in Bengaluru.

In a gated community in Whitefield, efforts are underway to establish a full-fledged community farm within the premises. With less than 40 people working on it on weekends, the farm is already a hit among its residents, especially children.

By Nirupama V
The Economic Times
Nov 10, 2016

Excerpt:

When he was a little boy, Harshvardhan Shitole’s grandmother taught him to how to grow a plant. When he moved to the city, he continued growing plants in his balcony but was never satisfied. A year ago, Shitole, along with five other families, decided to ‘give life’ to an empty plot in their neighbourhood, near the Jayadeva hospital flyover.

They made a compost pit, brought cow dung from a goshala nearby and set out to grow tomatoes and greens. “Our intention is not to take the produce back,” he said. “It is an unfenced plot.

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November 15, 2016   Comments Off on India: Bengaluru city slickers cultivate farming habits in vacant plots

Goa, India: School kids to be trained in urban gardening

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indkids

1. Short title and commencement.— (i) The scheme shall be called “Development of Kitchen Gardens”.

The Times of India
Oct 31, 2016

Panaji: Students in Goa will be soon taught to grow food in the comforts of their homes. Schools in Goa do not incorporate food education into their curricula, but, as a welcome change, the department of agriculture will be introducing this subject at select institutions in the state, after the Diwali vacations.

“We are going to have students grow vegetables within the school campus. This is to inculcate the interest of cultivation among them,” said director, agriculture, Ulhas Pai Kakode.

He added that schools with inadequate space can attempt teaching children on the terrace area as well. As part of this programme, agriculture officers will distribute free farming kits among students and teachers, and train them in the art of urban gardening. The kit will contain 16 items useful in the process of cultivation, including vegetable seeds, bio-fertilizers, bio-pesticides, vermi-compost, spray pump, etc.

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November 8, 2016   Comments Off on Goa, India: School kids to be trained in urban gardening

Urban Farming Forum Held in Mumbai

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hinda
Enthusiasts at the Urban Leaves, Don Bosco farm, Mating.

A panel discussion chaired by Jayant Kumar Banthia, former State Chief Secretary and chancellor, Narsee Monjee Institute of Management Studies (NMIMS), presented several ideas to incorporate urban farming into the city’s plans

By Diipti Jhangiani
The Hindu
Oct 9, 2016

Excerpt:

During the launch, Dr. Parasnis presented the carbon baseline survey of Navi Mumbai. She also shared vital statistics on the high pesticide and heavy metal content in commercially-grown fruits and vegetables. She shared the results of a survey by the University of Baroda, showing how commercially-grown fruits and vegetables contain pesticides like Aldrin, Chlordane, Dichlorvos much beyond the when permissible levels were 0.1 mg/kg.

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October 14, 2016   Comments Off on Urban Farming Forum Held in Mumbai

Mumbai’s iKheti: Grow your own edible garden, at home

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iket
Ms. Priyanka Amar presenting the Concept of iKheti to the President of India, Smt. Prathiba Singh Patil (12th President 2007-2012), at the WE School, Mumbai.

Priyanka Amar Shah, founder of iKheti, believes that urban farming has the potential to make cities greener. iKheti, a social enterprise started in 2012

Money Control
India’s Financial Portal
Sept, 2016

iKheti, which presently offers services in Mumbai and its outskirts and Pune, plans to spread to other cities of India. “We have already begun diversifying into developing edible landscaping. This involves using food plants as design features, to make it is visually appealing and also useful,” she explains.

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September 30, 2016   Comments Off on Mumbai’s iKheti: Grow your own edible garden, at home

Thiruvananthapuram, India: City residents can now grow and reap vegetables from their terrace through a monthly paid service system.

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growbgs

The civic body plans to cover 10,000 households under the scheme. 2.5 lakh agri-grow bags will be distributed across households in the city. The project has set aside Rs 6,000 per house for the first year.

By Aswin J Kumar
Time of India
Sep 1, 2016

Excerpt:

The project will be first launched in ten city wards. As per the scheme, the service can be availed at a rate of Rs 500 per month. “The residents can choose from 30 varieties of vegetables and we would plant 12 items on terrace. The civic body had earlier launched terrace farming programme but the initiative did not see success. Our aim is to convert this into a sustainable model,” said Sugathan S, one of the members associated with the initiative.

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September 8, 2016   Comments Off on Thiruvananthapuram, India: City residents can now grow and reap vegetables from their terrace through a monthly paid service system.

This Indian couple left their city life in Delhi to start an organic farm

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incp
The Cariappas supply over 35 vegetables to luxury wildlife resort Orange County. Juli seen here with son Azad.

But the year was 1986, and their decision to move from Delhi to Heggadadevana Kote, a remote area in the middle of a forest, located 60 kilometres from Mysore, wasn’t cheered on by enthusiastic friends.

By Megha Mahindru
Vogue India
August 30, 2016

Excerpt:

Their farm, Krac-a-Dawna, a name derived from a young Azad’s linguistic faux pas, besides being their home and workplace also serves as a bio shelter, open for experiential tours for farming enthusiasts. With no television or internet, it offers agri-tourists all that they can hope for.

Popular among gap-year students who wish to travel and do good, agri-tourism is now blooming in India as organic evangelists skip luxury hotel stays for a rustic farm holiday that teaches them everything from cattle grazing to soil tilling and cheesemaking.

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September 6, 2016   Comments Off on This Indian couple left their city life in Delhi to start an organic farm

A Terrace Kitchen garden in Kuwait

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terkuw

Last year they were able to get around 900 grams of Green Chilly in a single day from their terrace.

Indiansinkuwait
Apr 27, 2016

Excerpt:

The climates in Kuwait are so extreme that forget about growing plants in balconies and maintaining them, we often don’t even come to our balconies for spending few minutes together. But that doesn’t stop this couple from spending their leisure time together with a good cause. Their tryst with growing vegetables started around seven years at their balcony. The unimaginable pleasure from this later made them to convert the building terrace into an organic vegetable garden, thanks to the support of his building caretaker. Today in his building terrace, you can see variety of fully ripe vegetables, such as Brinjal, Chillies, Snake Gourd, Bitter Gourd, Beans, Capsicum, Lady’s finger, Yellow Cucumber (Vellarikkai) etc. Cabbage, Cauliflower, Onions are on the early stages.

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September 5, 2016   Comments Off on A Terrace Kitchen garden in Kuwait

India: Number Of Kitchen Gardeners Has Increased By Leaps And Bounds

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indk

“It is not that people are only interested for growing vegetables. They have been growing oilseeds, cacti and medicinal herbs.

Times of India
Aug 29, 2016

Excerpt:

“I have literally stopped depending on market for vegetables for the last three years except buying a few exotic ones. I have been growing almost all varieties of seasonal vegetables and spinaches on my 1,000 square feet rooftop kitchen garden, said Sugata Nayak, a homemaker in Gajapati Nagar of the city.

Nayak has also been giving consultation on kitchen garden and various aspects of urban farming to people.

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September 4, 2016   Comments Off on India: Number Of Kitchen Gardeners Has Increased By Leaps And Bounds