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Category — Middle East

Israel: Ultra-Orthodox kids grow a green thumb in ‘mitzvah’ gardens

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The gardens, like this one in Modiin Ilit on March 22, 2017, follow the commandment of kilayim, which requires that each species is planted a certain distance from the other. (Melanie Lidman/Times of Israel)

“We’re in a city, we’re not in a moshav or village where we’re exposed to the ideas of orchards and gardens,” Rivkie added.

By Melanie Lidman
The Times of Israel
June 11, 2017

Excerpt:

Families have also gotten into the spirit of the garden. As a year-end gift, Rivkie gave each student a mint plant to grow at home and use for the end-of-Shabbat Havdalah service, which makes use of a pleasant-smelling herb. Rivkie said one girl’s family grew so much mint they gave cuttings to their relatives, and now the whole extended family uses their own mint.

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June 16, 2017   No Comments

From Rooftop to Salad Bowl: Farming in Tel Aviv’s Urban Jungle

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Mendi Falk in Yarok Ba’ir (Green in the City), Dizengoff Center. By Dan Perez

Three enterprising farmers use hydroponic methods ?to grow veggies atop Dizengoff Center in the heart of ?Tel Aviv and offer them freshly picked on a daily basis.

By Ronit Vered
Haaretz
Mar 14, 2017

Excerpt:

The time is 10 A.M. After almost four hours of work in the vegetable garden, the farmers take fresh produce that was picked at dawn – green and red lettuce, celery, spinach and scallions – and descend from the rooftop to the commercial center to sell their wares.

The brigade of farmers – Mendi Falk, Shaked Golan and Niv Maman – make their way quickly via covered walkways, escalators and staircases, carrying crates of green leaves and pails of water. In each of the tiny stalls that have cropped up recently all over Dizengoff Center in Tel Aviv, they arrange the produce.

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March 21, 2017   Comments Off on From Rooftop to Salad Bowl: Farming in Tel Aviv’s Urban Jungle

Alternative farming on the rise in besieged Gaza

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Said Salim Abu Nasser has grown 3,500 kg of organic produce without any soil. He grows herbs, lettuce and peppers with aquaponic farming [Mersiha Gadzo/Al Jazeera] Click on image for larger file.

As fertile land shrinks and water crisis deepens, Palestinians are searching for different ways to feed their families.

By Mersiha Gadzo
Aljazeera
Jan 28, 2017

Excerpt:

At sunset on a warm January day, Said Salim Abu Nasser’s three grandsons crouched on the ground, using bricks to crush chalk into powder for calcium to help grow vegetables in water.

Abu Nasser, 53, has grown 3,500 kilogrammes of organic produce without any soil, transforming his rooftop and concrete lot in Gaza City into an organic oasis. He grows a dozen different types of vegetables and herbs for his family, including eight children and eight grandchildren.

Using hydroponic techniques, Abu Nasser can grow twice as many crops than with conventional techniques, and he saves 90 percent more water by recycling nutrient-dense water. His broccoli, tomatoes, lettuce and cauliflower float on polystyrene squares with holes cut into them, while their roots absorb nutrients from the water.

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January 29, 2017   Comments Off on Alternative farming on the rise in besieged Gaza

Book: Urban Agriculture for Growing City Regions – Connecting Urban-Rural Spheres in Casablanca

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The example of Casablanca, one of the fastest growing cities in North Africa

Edited by Undine Giseke, Maria Gerster-Bentaya, Frank Helten, Matthias Kraume, Dieter Scherer, Guido Spars, Fouad Amraoui, Abdelaziz Adidi, Said Berdouz, Mohemed Chlaida, Majid Mansour, Mohamed Mdafai
Routledge
2015

This book demonstrates how agriculture can play a determining role in sustainable, climate-optimised urban development. Agriculture within urban growth centres today is more than an economic or social left-over or a niche practice. It is instead a complex system that offers multiple potentials for tomorrow’s megacities. Urban open space and agriculture can be connected to productive urban landscapes – this forms new urban-rural linkages in the urban region and helps shape the city. But in order to do this, agriculture has to be seen as an integral part of the urban fabric and it has to be put on the local agenda.

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January 12, 2017   Comments Off on Book: Urban Agriculture for Growing City Regions – Connecting Urban-Rural Spheres in Casablanca

Hydroponic farm for refugees, foreign workers launches on Tel Aviv rooftop

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Hydroponic farm for refugees, foreign workers launches on Tel Aviv rooftop. (photo credit:ASSAF OSTROVSKI)

“They don’t have the same language, so they can’t communicate,” urban farming consultant Lavi Kushelevich told The Jerusalem Post on Wednesday. “But they can communicate through food.”

By Sharon Udasin
Jerusalem Post
01/05/2017

Excerpt:

On the toughest street in the toughest neighborhood of south Tel Aviv, Darfurian refugees, Chinese workers and Israelis are working together to make a rooftop blossom.

“They don’t have the same language, so they can’t communicate,” urban farming consultant Lavi Kushelevich told The Jerusalem Post on Wednesday. “But they can communicate through food.”

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January 6, 2017   Comments Off on Hydroponic farm for refugees, foreign workers launches on Tel Aviv rooftop

Syrian refugees find solace in rooftop garden

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‘My spirit is relaxed when I’m out here,’ Fatin Kazzi says of her balcony garden [Olivia Alabaster/Al Jazeera]

Of the one million registered Syrian refugees in tiny Lebanon, 10 percent are considered to be food-secure. Photo By Olivia Alabaster.

By Olivia Alabaster
Aljazeera
Sept 6, 2016

Excerpt:

Beirut – Fatin Kazzi’s sun-drenched balcony garden is a cluster of makeshift planters, some fashioned out of crates or the ends of two-litre plastic water bottles.

Already bursting with strawberries, mint, basil, peppers and celery, the garden is just a month old, but Kazzi – who is living in Beirut as a refugee having fled Aleppo five years ago amid Syria’s civil war – eventually hopes to be able to make her own salad from the vegetables here.

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January 5, 2017   Comments Off on Syrian refugees find solace in rooftop garden

Tel Aviv’s rooftop farm grows fresh food for thousands

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© Shani Sadicario — A view of the rooftop garden’s education centre.

Located above the Dizengoff shopping center, this urban farm uses hydroponics to grow vegetables rapidly and organically.

By Katherine Martinko (@feistyredhair)
Living / Green Food
Tree Hugger
December 19, 2016

Excerpt:

As part of a project called ‘Green in the City,’ or Yarok Bair in Hebrew, an urban rooftop farm has been established over the past year. It comprises two commercial greenhouses, totaling 750 square meters (over 8,000 square feet) of growing space, as well as an educational area where citizens can learn urban farming techniques and cooking skills relevant to the vegetables they grow. The organization sells hydroponics units for home use and teaches people how to use them.

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December 27, 2016   Comments Off on Tel Aviv’s rooftop farm grows fresh food for thousands

One Palestinian man’s mission to make urban agriculture more sustainable

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This video was produced, filmed and edited by Yasser Abu Wazna, a freelance filmmaker based in the Palestinian Territory.

He produces approximately 3,500 kilograms (7,716 pounds) of food — enough to feed 30 people.

By Todd Reubold
Ensia
Nov 22, 2016
(Must see. Mike.)

Around the world, urban agriculture is playing a role in feeding a growing global population from mid-America to the Middle East. This video introduces Said Salim Abu Naser, a proponent of sustainable agriculture living and working in Gaza City, Palestine along the Mediterranean Coast.

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November 23, 2016   Comments Off on One Palestinian man’s mission to make urban agriculture more sustainable

Webinar: Aquaponics In Gaza – 28th of October, 2016

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gazhy

Improving food security and nutrition in resource limited urban areas

The presenter is Christopher Somerville, who has been working for FAO projects in the West Bank and Gaza Strip since 2012.
Friday 28 October 2016
2:00 – 3:00 pm (Rome time),
FAO HQ – AGD Meeting Room (B640)

Aquaponics is a sustainable food production system that combines aquaculture (raising fish) and hydroponics (growing soil-less plants). Both practices mutually benefit from each other’s presence in one production unit. The fish waste provides an organic food source for the growing plants and the plants provide a natural filter for the water the fish live in.

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October 26, 2016   Comments Off on Webinar: Aquaponics In Gaza – 28th of October, 2016

Can urban agriculture help to save east Aleppo, Syria?

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alpo
‘There’s still the problem of not enough fuel or farm hands,’ says farmer Salim Atrache [Mahmoud Shehabi. Aljazeera]

As conditions worsen, one local farm is trying to feed besieged residents, one crop at a time.

Adam Lucente and Zouhir Al Shimale
Aljazeera
Oct 17, 2016

Excerpt:

Although some Aleppo residents have already been raising animals and growing food in the city, what makes Atrache’s project unique is the size of the plot and the intent to provide food for the masses.

“We’ll sell the crops so we can cover our expenses,” explained Abu Brain, who works on the farm. He said that the farm would go out of its way to ensure that none of its crops ended up in the hands of the government, aiming only to provide food for rebel areas.

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October 17, 2016   Comments Off on Can urban agriculture help to save east Aleppo, Syria?

Dubai’s Sustainable City Includes Urban Farming

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bio2

There is a 3 hectare farm running across the City’s central spine. This community farm accommodates 38,000 sqft (3,500 sqm) of Biodome Greenhouses dedicated to the growing of fruits, herbs and vegetables.

By Nick Webster
The National AE
Sept 4, 2016

Excerpts:

The city’s urban farm produces more than 20 kinds of herbs and will soon start growing fruit and vegetables once the productive landscape matures. About 2,000 date palms are on the property. Green compost is used on everything grown.

“We are also looking into composting our food waste, turning it into a resource that will improve our soils.

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September 10, 2016   Comments Off on Dubai’s Sustainable City Includes Urban Farming

A Terrace Kitchen garden in Kuwait

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terkuw

Last year they were able to get around 900 grams of Green Chilly in a single day from their terrace.

Indiansinkuwait
Apr 27, 2016

Excerpt:

The climates in Kuwait are so extreme that forget about growing plants in balconies and maintaining them, we often don’t even come to our balconies for spending few minutes together. But that doesn’t stop this couple from spending their leisure time together with a good cause. Their tryst with growing vegetables started around seven years at their balcony. The unimaginable pleasure from this later made them to convert the building terrace into an organic vegetable garden, thanks to the support of his building caretaker. Today in his building terrace, you can see variety of fully ripe vegetables, such as Brinjal, Chillies, Snake Gourd, Bitter Gourd, Beans, Capsicum, Lady’s finger, Yellow Cucumber (Vellarikkai) etc. Cabbage, Cauliflower, Onions are on the early stages.

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September 5, 2016   Comments Off on A Terrace Kitchen garden in Kuwait

Pleasures of Roof top Gardening in Bangladesh

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dkh

The person, who will make a garden in his /her roof, will get a 10 percent holding tax rebate, and it is promised by Sayeed Khokon, Mayor, DSCC.

By Nilima Jahan
The Daily Star
July 22, 2016

Excerpt:

“If a person grows only vegetables in a 600-700 square feet roof, it is enough to meet the yearly demand of a family having 6-7 members”, believes Ehteshamul Haque Mallik, President, Urban Roof Gardeners Society (URGS), and Deputy Director, Bangladesh Bank. Mallik has a 1500 square feet garden on his roof, where he has been growing a number of vegetables and local fruits for the past 15 years. After his amazing success, he founded the organisation URGS, two and a half years ago and through this, he is helping more than 500 registered members.

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July 26, 2016   Comments Off on Pleasures of Roof top Gardening in Bangladesh

Karachi, Pakistan: Plant fruit trees to revive public parks

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frukara
Environmental activists suggest residents and local administration should come together to turn abandoned spaces into community orchards.

“The few trees we have in Karachi are because of the endeavours of the citizens, not the government and they should surely get together to plant fruit trees in their neighbourhood parks,”

By Ferya Ilyas
The Express Tribune
July 15, 2016

Excerpt:

Horticulturist Mooraj says parks in Karachi in the 60s and the 70s had many fruit bearing trees such as jujubes, java plums and mangoes. “KMC would issue contracts annually to picks fruits from these parks and use the income generated from this activity for maintenance,” he recalls.

With scores of people living below the poverty line in the city, Mooraj says fruit trees can provide food to the needy. “People should keep the greater good in mind. The trees will continue to give fruit and shade to many even after they are long gone,” he stresses.

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July 19, 2016   Comments Off on Karachi, Pakistan: Plant fruit trees to revive public parks

Sudan: Urban Agriculture Facing Land Pressure in Greater Khartoum – The Case of New Real Estate Projects in Tuti and Abu Se ‘id

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sudan

Dr Alice Franck’s Presentation On Urban Agriculture At The Sudanese Institute Of Architects (SIA)’S 4Th Scientific And Professional Conference

On 23rd May, 2016, Dr Alice Franck, Geographer and Coordinator of CEDEJ Khartoum, presented her paper at the Sudanese Institute of Architects (SIA)’s 4th Scientific and Professional conference.

Excerpt from Abstract:

My initial research into this location of intense speculation examined the future of the central areas that remained under agricultural activity and how they were gradually being transformed into urban areas (Franck 2007). The approach adopted analysed the resistance of agriculture and farmers to the spread of real estate and the pressure of competition over land ownership. Five years later, the action in favour of urban plan renewal has been drastically intensified and the capacity for resistance severely diminished; three of the five market gardening areas (Tuti, Shambat, Abu Se’id, Abu Rof and Mogran) observed during fieldwork in 2001–5 are subject to huge real estate projects (Mogran, Abu Se’id and Tuti). In this chapter, I focus my analysis on how landowners and the entire agricultural sector can both adapt to and confront the transformation.

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May 26, 2016   Comments Off on Sudan: Urban Agriculture Facing Land Pressure in Greater Khartoum – The Case of New Real Estate Projects in Tuti and Abu Se ‘id