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Category — Nutrition

Farming Under the Sea for Japan’s Rare Delicacy

Mozuku is a rare underwater delicacy found off the mainland coast.

Great Big Story
Published
May 21, 2018

Seventy miles off the coast of mainland Japan is the small island of Okinawa, home to some of the most unique seaweed in the world. Mozuku is a rare underwater delicacy found off the mainland coast. Each fall, farmer Tadashi Oshiro uses a special technique to sustainably harvest the seaweed. His one-of-a-kind farming methods were passed down to him by his father, using a process that allows the mozuku to grow without creating additional waste.

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May 29, 2018   Comments Off on Farming Under the Sea for Japan’s Rare Delicacy

A Food Forest Grows in Atlanta

Lakewood-Browns Mill neighbors get ready for a guided hike during the Food Forest Festival. (City of Atlanta courtesy photo)

This project was conceived as part of a larger strategy to address food deserts, or low-income areas that lack fresh whole foods due to the absence of grocery stores.

Posted by Nausheen Iqbal
Cooperative Forestry, USDA Forest Service in Forestry
May 04, 2018

Excerpt:

This community forest utilizes agroforestry–agriculture that combines trees and shrubs with agricultural uses to create more healthy and productive land. The site already has a pecan orchard, black walnut trees, muscadine grapes, and fruit-producing blackberry brambles on site. This spring, the community will honor the local heritage by adding pawpaw trees that are native to the area.

Members of the Atlanta Public Schools Farm-to-School program are eager to incorporate this asset as an educational site. Students from two area schools within walking distance of the food forest have already shared their vision for what they would like to see grown there, with blackberries and grapes being the favorites.

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May 11, 2018   Comments Off on A Food Forest Grows in Atlanta

The world’s first desktop Hive™ for growing edible insects

Start a food revolution out of your kitchen with the Hive™ and grow healthy, delicious and sustainable mealworms in your home. Sold by Livin farms $699.00

Easter Egg Hunt Recipe: No Bake Energy Ball/Eggs using 1/2 cup ground mealworms

Recipes for No Bake Energy Ball/Eggs

Ingredients:
1 cup old-fashioned oats
1/2 cup peanut butter
1/2 cup ground mealworms
1/2 cup chocolate chips
1/3 cup honey
1 tablespoon chia seeds (optional)
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Directions
Combine oats, peanut butter, ground mealworms, chocolate chips, honey, chia seeds, and vanilla extract together in a bowl. Cover and chill dough in the refrigerator 30 minutes.
Remove dough from refrigerator; roll into balls, about 1 inch in diameter.

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April 5, 2018   Comments Off on The world’s first desktop Hive™ for growing edible insects

Social entrepreneur sprouts urban farming program to help inner city children live healthier lives in Charlotte, North Carolina

From left: Ryan Dunn with Earnest Porter and Aliya Hillian in the greenhouse at the Andrew and Walter Young Family YMCA in Atlanta. (Photo courtesy of Ryan Dunn)

“You see these kids going to school every day with a [soda and candy] bar and then they couldn’t sit still,” Dunn said. “They’d be full of sugar or hungry, and have a bad attitude or make bad decisions relating to others, and not understand why.”

By American Heart Association News
Feb 28, 2018

Excerpt:

Dunn cofounded the nonprofit Next Generation Youth Center in 2013, a mentoring program serving kids on probation, and arranged for each to get a box of food from the food bank where the program met. He now works as an urban agriculture consultant, offering programs for students and community groups.

He said his lessons are rooted in the science of farming with the goal of producing healthy food-producing plants, but serve as allegory for the bigger life lessons of patience, perseverance and the importance of overall health and nutrition.

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March 7, 2018   Comments Off on Social entrepreneur sprouts urban farming program to help inner city children live healthier lives in Charlotte, North Carolina

Africa: Urban agriculture, dietary diversity and child health in a sample of Tanzanian town folk

In short, we identified urban agriculture as one channel through which dietary diversity can be increased and, ultimately, improved child health can be achieved in the cities of developing countries.

By Natascha Wagner & Luca Tasciotti
Canadian Journal of Development Studies
Nov 27, 2017

Abstract:

Undernutrition and micronutrient deficiency continue to be two of the major health burdens in less developed economies. In this study, we explore the link between urban agriculture, dietary diversity and child health, using weight-for-age and height-for-age Z-scores. The study makes use of two rounds of observational data for urban Tanzania and employs an instrumental variables estimation approach. We show that practising urban agriculture leads to the consumption of a greater variety of food items and the health status of urban children living in households practising urban agriculture significantly improves in the short and, more importantly, long term.

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December 10, 2017   Comments Off on Africa: Urban agriculture, dietary diversity and child health in a sample of Tanzanian town folk

Some Food Banks Are Using Vertical Farms

Canada: The Surrey Food Bank’s vertical farm system. (Photo © Pixel Perfect Photography)

Vertical farms allow food banks to grow their own produce with high-tech systems in an effort to fight food insecurity year-round.

By Jodi Helmer
Civil Eats
11.17.17

Excerpt:

One of the biggest arguments against food banks getting into the vertical-farming business is simply that these systems are pricey. The Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma paid $140,000 for its two Growtainers, securing a grant from the Morningcrest Healthcare Foundation to purchase the vertical farms. It costs an additional $680 per month for electricity to power them.

For nonprofits, cost can be a barrier and, in some locations, indoor farms are an unnecessary expense. The learning curve can also be steep and most food banks rely on volunteer labor to handle maintenance and harvesting, often with training from the manufacturers of the vertical systems.

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November 24, 2017   Comments Off on Some Food Banks Are Using Vertical Farms

Canada: Victoria school garden teaching students value of outdoor activity

Westshore Centre for Learning student Josh Hill (right) and a member of the Western Garden Club help themselves to a lunch of pumpkin and apple soup, mixed greens, croutons and pumpkin pie at the school’s campus in Colwood Thursday. The students grew and harvested everything in the meal in the community garden. (Kendra Wong/News Gazette staff)

The garden has been happening in various capacities on the property for the last 12 years, however, this year the school was able to add a greenhouse, thanks to funding from the Horner Foundation

By Kendra Wong
Victoria News
Nov. 6, 2017

Excerpt:

As part of the school’s sustainable resources class, which runs from February to June and gives students a Grade 11 science credit, students learn how to plant and nurture seedlings, transplant, weed out and harvest in the roughly, 4,000-square foot garden on Sooke Road. Students had their own grow boxes and planted a variety of tomatoes, lettuces, cabbages, raspberries, carrots, beets, herbs, apples, squash and onions.

While other schools have gardens, Jennifer Freeman of Zero Mile Solutions who helps support the development of the garden, said this one is unique in that gardening is integrated into the curriculum.

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November 13, 2017   Comments Off on Canada: Victoria school garden teaching students value of outdoor activity

Interview with Sundari Kraft: “People eat more veggies when they take part in gardening”

Kraft is the founder of Sustainable Food Denver, founding co-chair of the Denver Sustainable Food Policy Council, and founder of one of Denver’s first multi-plot urban farms.

By Brian Frederick
Food Tank
Oct. 2017

Excerpt:

FT: One of your legislative successes is a policy to allow Denver residents to raise chickens, ducks, and dwarf goats within the city limits. How practical is this in an urban setting and how do you hope this will benefit individual health?

SK: Anytime someone is considering raising an animal—whether it’s a chicken or a dog—they need to make sure that they have the appropriate space, tools, and time to adequately care for that animal. That being said, city-appropriate food-producing animals can absolutely be raised successfully in an urban backyard. These animals are no more difficult to care for than the pets that we’re used to seeing in cities (like dogs and cats)—it’s just that most of us haven’t grown up with them and we’ve lost the knowledge of how to care for them. Luckily, there are a number of books focused on urban homesteading, as well as classes in some cities focused on backyard chickens or goats.

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October 19, 2017   Comments Off on Interview with Sundari Kraft: “People eat more veggies when they take part in gardening”

Could gardening lower your risk of cancer? A Colorado researcher aims to find out

Wally Gallaher, left, age 90 gets some help from By Cha, who helps pull up some of the weeds that have crept in while he was on vacation. Member gardeners gather at the Arvada Community Garden.

University of Colorado Boulder study measures health of community gardeners in Denver area

By Danika Worthington
The Denver Post
September 21, 2017

Excerpt:

A green thumb may lower your risk of cancer.

Don’t believe it? You’re not the only one. Which is why a University of Colorado Boulder researcher is setting out to find hard evidence during a three-year clinical trial that will measure a variety of health factors in 312 participants who will be introduced to community gardening for the first time.

“We tend to intervene from the top down,” CU Boulder professor Jill Litt said of programs to improve physical inactivity and poor diets. “You need solutions from the ground up to meet people where they’re at.”

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September 26, 2017   Comments Off on Could gardening lower your risk of cancer? A Colorado researcher aims to find out

Is picking edible weeds off the streets the next foodie trend?

Chef John Farais looks for wild edible weeds that he grows in his backyard in San Rafael. (Devika G. Bansal/Bay Area News Group)

“It can’t get any more local than picking what’s growing on your front step.”

By Devika G. Bansal
Bay Area News Group
July 17, 2017

Excerpt:

People have been foraging since long before this country was founded, said Hank Shaw, a forager and chef based in Sacramento and author of the book “Hunt, Gather, Cook: Finding the Forgotten Feast.”

“But it has been growing in the last 10 years because people are starting to mistrust the industrial food system,” Shaw said. “They’re starting to take more control over what they feed their family.”

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July 28, 2017   Comments Off on Is picking edible weeds off the streets the next foodie trend?

Post-Disaster Food and Nutrition from Urban Agriculture: A Self-Sufficiency Analysis of Nerima Ward, Tokyo

Figure 9. Disaster drill held in Nerima ward. (a) Urban farmland with a high diversity in crops; (b) Farmer and volunteers preparing soup with fresh vegetables from the farm in a portable gas stove; (c) Rice and crackers provided by the municipality as emergency food with freshly made soup containing vegetables from the farm; (d) People from the neighborhood familiarizing with each other and the farmer (photographs by the authors, November 2016).

The present study aimed to quantify the potential nutrient production of urban agricultural vegetables and the resulting nutritional self-sufficiency throughout the year for mitigating post-disaster situations.

By Giles Bruno Sioen, OrcID, Makiko Sekiyama, Toru Terada and Makoto Yokohari
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017
(Must see. Mike)

Abstract:

Background: Post-earthquake studies from around the world have reported that survivors relying on emergency food for prolonged periods of time experienced several dietary related health problems. The present study aimed to quantify the potential nutrient production of urban agricultural vegetables and the resulting nutritional self-sufficiency throughout the year for mitigating post-disaster situations. Methods: We estimated the vegetable production of urban agriculture throughout the year. Two methods were developed to capture the production from professional and hobby farms: Method I utilized secondary governmental data on agricultural production from professional farms, and Method II was based on a supplementary spatial analysis to estimate the production from hobby farms. Next, the weight of produced vegetables [t] was converted into nutrients [kg].

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July 16, 2017   Comments Off on Post-Disaster Food and Nutrition from Urban Agriculture: A Self-Sufficiency Analysis of Nerima Ward, Tokyo

India: Gardening for nutrition in bastis (slums)

Lady of a basti family holding her baby and showing the pumpkin she grew with pride.

“The mission of Urban Health Resource Centre is to bring about sustainable improvements in the health conditions of the urban poor by influencing policies and programmes and empowering the community.”

From their Facebook Page
Urban Health Resource Centre

Excerpt:

Slum families usually have very small houses. Therefore, they find it nearly impossible to grow enough vegetables to yield ample fresh produce to use for nutritious meals. Along with nutrition, growing plants provides confidence and a sense for making their immediate world more beautiful and natural.

Caring for plants gives a sense of well being in a place where it is most desperately needed With soft, attentive motivation and gentle perseverance, UHRC’s social facilitators encouraged slum families to grow vegetables that would thrive in their respective houses.

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June 28, 2017   Comments Off on India: Gardening for nutrition in bastis (slums)

Namibia: ‘Growing Food in Windhoek’ Handbook

By producing food in and around the city, we can connect – the production with the market, experiments, ideas and solutions, and people of all ages and all walks of life.

Excerpt:

Namibia needs to urgently tackle hunger, undernourishment and malnutrition. Thee latest data stems from the 2016 Global Hunger Index of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

In this report, “hunger” refers to four indicators – undernourishment, child stunting (low height-for-age), child wasting (low weight-for-height), and child mortality.

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April 24, 2017   Comments Off on Namibia: ‘Growing Food in Windhoek’ Handbook

How one South Carolina woman is creating an oasis in a food desert

With the departure of big name grocery stores, the area has been declared a food desert – defined by the USDA as a low-income community of at least 500 people and/or at least 33 percent of the census tract’s population residing more than one mile from a supermarket or large grocery store.

By Susan Ardis
The State
Apr 4, 2017

Excerpt:

On what was once a vacant lot behind Chicora Graded School – on Success Street – Germaine Jenkins is planting the seeds of hope and sustainability with Fresh Future Farm, a 0.81 acre, no-till organic farm growing fresh fruits and vegetables and providing fresh honey and eggs directly to the community.

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April 11, 2017   Comments Off on How one South Carolina woman is creating an oasis in a food desert

Milwaukee: How to Create 3,000 Urban Gardens


Volunteers dig deep in the Victory Garden Urban Farm, located in Harambee at 220 E. Concordia Ave.

Non-profit Victory Gardens Initiative fills city’s food deserts with fresh produce.

By Naomi Waxman
Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service
Mar 14th, 2017

Excerpt:

“The core niche of what I do is about home, growing your own food in your own home and giving your children the nourishment they need for their brains and bodies,” said Mead.

Since 2008, that single plot has blossomed into the Victory Garden Initiative (VGI), a thriving community of staff and volunteers committed to helping Milwaukee residents grow their own food and cook nutritious meals for their families.

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March 20, 2017   Comments Off on Milwaukee: How to Create 3,000 Urban Gardens