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Category — Nutrition

Milwaukee: How to Create 3,000 Urban Gardens

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Volunteers dig deep in the Victory Garden Urban Farm, located in Harambee at 220 E. Concordia Ave.

Non-profit Victory Gardens Initiative fills city’s food deserts with fresh produce.

By Naomi Waxman
Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service
Mar 14th, 2017

Excerpt:

“The core niche of what I do is about home, growing your own food in your own home and giving your children the nourishment they need for their brains and bodies,” said Mead.

Since 2008, that single plot has blossomed into the Victory Garden Initiative (VGI), a thriving community of staff and volunteers committed to helping Milwaukee residents grow their own food and cook nutritious meals for their families.

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March 20, 2017   No Comments

California: Contra Costa County’s Subsidized-Housing Communities To Get A Large Community Garden And Urban Farm

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Ray Harts has plans to start with 10 raised garden beds, a 500 square foot shade structure and and an urban farm where crops would be sold to local restaurants. (Susan Tripp Pollard/Bay Area News Group)

“This garden will produce unity — it will bring people together, even if it’s just for the vegetables,” Aqeel said.

By Sam Richards
East Bay Times
Mar 13, 2017

Excerpt:

Pittsburg, California — Heracio Harts grew up near the El Pueblo housing project, and now he’s come back to grow vegetables there.

Harts, known by most as “Ray,” stands on a 2-acre plot, thick with tall grass fed by recent rains. That rain has also added a layer of rust to an old baseball backstop he said he’ll tear out to make room for a community garden behind the El Pueblo main office.

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March 19, 2017   No Comments

International Journal of Epidemiology: Eating more fruits and vegetables may prevent millions of premature deaths

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Thomas Angus [Photographer].

“We wanted to investigate how much fruit and vegetables you need to eat to gain the maximum protection against disease, and premature death. Our results suggest that although five portions of fruit and vegetables is good, ten a day is even better.”

By Kate Wighton
Imperial College London
23 February 2017
Excerpt:

This is the finding of new research, led by scientists from Imperial College London, which analysed 95 studies on fruit and vegetable intake.

The team found that although even the recommended five portions of fruit and vegetables a day reduced disease risk, the greatest benefit came from eating 800g a day (roughly equivalent to ten portions – one portion of fruit or vegetables if defined as 80g).

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March 17, 2017   No Comments

Urban Farm providing affordable healthy options in Jacksonville, Florida

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“Many local merchants believe that people would not buy fruits and vegetables. But they would if given the opportunity,” said Maxey. He invites families to come to the Urban Farm to get exactly what they need.

By Ashley Harding
News 4JAX
Mar 3, 2017

Excerpt:

People in New Town said they just don’t have many resources for healthy living. That’s why, a community garden through Urban Geoponics is hoping to change that by providing healthy food that are affordable.

The garden is located at the Urban Farm at 3rd and Pearce streets in New Town.

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March 11, 2017   Comments Off on Urban Farm providing affordable healthy options in Jacksonville, Florida

A Washington D.C. Urban Farm Takes On Urban Problems

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Dreaming Out Loud’s new farm hopes to provide jobs, business incubation, and more in a city ward that has often been overlooked.

By Whitney Pipkin
Civil Eats
Jan 19, 2017

Excerpt:

Little more than grass used to grow on the two-acre plot behind a middle school in the District of Columbia where tomatoes, okra, and infrastructure for food entrepreneurs will begin cropping up this year.

In a ward of the city with just two grocery stores serving more than 70,000 residents, fresh produce is hard to come by. But the Kelly Miller Farm, which will be situated behind a middle school with the same name, aims to offer much more: youth programs, a community garden accessible to seniors, and a commercial kitchen from which area residents can launch food-based businesses.

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January 25, 2017   Comments Off on A Washington D.C. Urban Farm Takes On Urban Problems

First Bite: How We Learn to Eat

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Bee introduces us to people who can only eat food of a certain colour; toddlers who will eat nothing but hot dogs; doctors who have found radical new ways to help children eat vegetables

By Bee Wilson
Basic Books
Originally Harper Collins
Reprint edition (November 8, 2016)

We are not born knowing what to eat. We all have to learn it as children sitting expectantly at a table. For our diets to change, we need to relearn the food experiences that first shaped us.
Everyone starts drinking milk. After that it’s all up for grabs.

We are not born knowing what to eat; we each have to figure it out for ourselves. From childhood onwards, we learn how big a portion is and how sweet is too sweet. We learn to love broccoli or not. But how does this happen? What are the origins of taste? And once we acquire our food habits, can we ever change them for the better?

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January 21, 2017   Comments Off on First Bite: How We Learn to Eat

Bonton Farms Plants Hope in the Middle of Dallas Food Desert

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From Bonton Farms, photographed in November.

Residents who live in Bonton, which is one of the oldest historic black neighborhoods in Dallas, did not decide to grow their own produce out of a desire to follow a food trend. Just like hundreds of thousands of other people who live in the southern sector of one of the wealthiest cities in America, they live in a food desert.

By Courtney Gilmore
NBC DFW
Dec 20, 2016

Excerpt:

“We have the number one childhood poverty rate in the United States and that is unacceptable,” Babcock said. “For a city that’s as prosperous as Dallas, that’s unacceptable. That we have 40 communities that are sick and dying that don’t have food. That’s unacceptable.”

Daron began to notice the correlation between the lack of healthy food options and the high rate of diabetes, heart disease, cancer and stroke.

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December 28, 2016   Comments Off on Bonton Farms Plants Hope in the Middle of Dallas Food Desert

The Greater Newark Conservancy helps inner city children get a nutritious diet

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concr
Court Street Urban Farm. Land sits next to the Krueger-Scott Mansion, an 1888 landmark once owned by a city beer baron. We’ve been able to produce over 15,000 pounds of produce during the course of one growing season! Click on image for larger file.

The conservancy recruits teenagers from all Newark high schools as paid interns. They work 25- to 30-hour weeks in the summer and 10- to 15-hour weeks during the school year.

By Jane Primerano
NJ Spotlight
Nov 30, 2016

Excerpt:

Besides the Court Street farm, a larger parcel on Hawthorne Street functions as a community garden where residents lease their own plots. There are 200 4- by 8-foot raised beds that are leased by residents who pay $10 a year and receive $20 worth of seeds, according to director of Urban Agriculture Justin Allen.

Robin Dougherty, the executive director of the conservancy, said the not-for-profit group would love to expand the reach of its Urban Agriculture program, but an economic boom in the city may present difficulties.

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December 6, 2016   Comments Off on The Greater Newark Conservancy helps inner city children get a nutritious diet

Productive spaces assessed in Food System and Food Security Study for the City of Cape Town

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fodeat
Figure 9.7: Foods eaten by households in Cape Town in the previous 24 hours (Source: Battersby, 2011, p15) Click on image for larger file.

The Provincial Department of Agriculture has supported 114 community gardens within the City since 2008 to present.

Prepared by: Jane Battersby (UCT)
Gareth Haysom (UCT)
Godfrey Tawodzera (UCT)
Milla McLachlan (Stellenbosch)
Jonathan Crush (UCT)
First Public Report July 2016
July 5, 2014
334 pages

Excerpt:

Productive spaces

The in-city food production is of benefit to a city like Cape Town, particularly in terms of delivering cheaper food and bringing greater dietary diversity and nutritional benefit. The discussion of Cape Town’s in-house food supply focuses on commercial agriculture and the form and fate of the unique productive agriculturally-zoned areas within the boundaries of the City of Cape Town (Chapter 4) and urban agriculture (Chapter 5). A constant theme is the tension between the valuation of agricultural land in terms of its

contribution to food security versus alternative means of valuation such as the argued need for land for development and housing options. Detailed information is available on this element of the food system and its analysis prompts the following conclusions:

• There is vital agricultural production within Cape Town. While there is large-scale production of grapes and other fruit for export, there is also high production of staple vegetables and livestock, both of which support more local consumption;

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July 26, 2016   Comments Off on Productive spaces assessed in Food System and Food Security Study for the City of Cape Town

Report: Community and home gardens increase vegetable intake and food security of residents in San Jose, California

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mesaThe La Mesa Verde program in San Jose helps low-income families to establish their own vegetable gardens. A pilot study found that gardening in either a community or backyard space made a significant contribution to gardeners’ daily vegetable intake.

“Gardening made a substantial contribution to vegetable intake regardless of socioeconomic background or previous gardening experience,” said co-author Lucy Diekmann, a postdoctoral researcher in the Food and Agribusiness Institute at Santa Clara University.

By Susan Algert, UC ANR Cooperative Extension
Lucy Diekmann, Santa Clara University
Leslie Gray, Santa Clara University
Marian Renvall, UC San Diego Department of Medicine
California Agriculture 70(2):77-82. DOI: 10.3733/ca.v070n02p77.
April-June 2016.
(Must read. Mike.)

Abstract:

As of 2013, 42 million American households were involved in growing their own food either at home or in a community garden plot. The purpose of this pilot study was to document the extent to which gardeners, particularly less affluent ones, increase their vegetable intake when eating from either home or community garden spaces. Eighty-five community gardeners and 50 home gardeners from San Jose, California, completed a survey providing information on demographic background, self-rated health, vegetable intake and the benefits of gardening.

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June 4, 2016   Comments Off on Report: Community and home gardens increase vegetable intake and food security of residents in San Jose, California

Community garden at West Rockhill churches to benefit food pantries in Pennsylvania

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churBob Groff, left, and Penelope Rox shovel mushroom soil into a wheelbarrow at the community garden at Jerusalem Lutheran Church in West Rockhill. Bob Keeler-Digital First Media

“The churches are looking for ways to partner for the benefit of the wider community, and the garden is a great way to build relationships while serving others.”

By Bob Keeler
Montgomery Media
Apr 28, 2016

Except:

“You’ll have to excuse the enthusiasm,” Wiley said. “I’ve been talking about this for two years and it’s finally happening.”

The food raised in the garden will be donated to the Pennridge FISH and Keystone Opportunity Center food pantries, she said.

“We know the need is great,” said St. Michael’s Lutheran Church Pastor Julie Bergdahl. The Sellersville congregation is partnering with Jerusalem in the community garden.

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May 5, 2016   Comments Off on Community garden at West Rockhill churches to benefit food pantries in Pennsylvania

Urban Farming in Syria Saves Lives During Sieges

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syrirr
Irrigation systems in place and planting begins in Yarmouk.

The 15th garden, it’s an urban gardening project that provides food for people living in Syrian cities that are under siege. Currently there are 30 of the gardens in 17 different besieged cities throughout Syria.

By Bezdomny
Shareable
Apr 29, 2016
(Must see! Mike)

Excerpt:

The project started with a group of Zabadani women who needed seeds to grow food, yet nothing was allowed to enter or exit the city. At that time, Zabadani was still under siege by both Assad forces and Hezbollah. Siege warfare is brutal and turns a city into a prison. To give an example of how severe the blockade was, Abdallah says, not even the UN was able to retrieve dying patients from the city in order to give them proper care. And there is no shortage of patients in Syria, just this week the Assad regime attacked the rebel held side of Aleppo which destroyed a vital hospital and resulted in at least 50 deaths.

In response to the Zabadani Women’s call for support, a network of German farmers collected heritage seeds and money in a show of solidarity with Syrian farmers, and sent the seeds to Lebanon (which is just across the border from Zabadani). From Lebanon the supplies made their way to Zabadani through an underground network of activists who risked their lives to get the seeds through the blockade.

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May 1, 2016   Comments Off on Urban Farming in Syria Saves Lives During Sieges

Houston’s Hope Farms Breaks Ground

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hopeRecipe for Success Foundation celebrated Earth Day 2016 by officially breaking ground on Hope Farms.

Houston’s New Urban Farming Project Will Provide Fresh Produce, Farmer Training, Nutrition Education and Community Gathering Space in Historic Sunnyside

By Jovanna David
Press Release
Apr 22, 2016

Excerpt:

Located on seven acres in the heart of Houston’s historic Sunnyside neighborhood, the new Hope Farms will use organic methods to generate significant food crops in the midst of one of the city’s largest food deserts, while training military veterans to become successful agri-entrepreneurs.

Hope Farms is a critical component in achieving Recipe for Success Foundation’s mission to change the way children understand, appreciate and eat their food and to mobilize the community to provide healthier diets for children.

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April 27, 2016   Comments Off on Houston’s Hope Farms Breaks Ground

The Cricket Reactor

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crikreacDetail of the cartridge and access wall to the Cricket Reactor.

An alternative approach to urban agriculture where city bio-wastes are used to farm algae and fungi, which are in turn fed to insects. In turn, the crickets are processed into an edible flour

by Christine Leu
Canadian Architect
Apr 18, 2016

Excerpt:

Jakub Dzamba, a University of Toronto graduate and Ph.D. candidate designed the Reactor. It consists of a series of interconnected, clear chambers from which crickets may feed and grow. The Reactor is well-sealed to prevent the escape of the wayward cricket into our world.

The architectural language of the Reactor could be described as “antfarm-Modernist.” A large, clear, central atrium with detachable clear pods at the sides to accommodate a variety of programmes, or in this case, different bio-wastes. The density of the insects per square inch is evocative of urban living, and reminiscent of maximizing return on investment for repeating condominium units in the sky.

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April 21, 2016   Comments Off on The Cricket Reactor

GrowHop: Urban Cricket Farm & FoodLab

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Ottawa business is going to make you love eating bugs!

From Indiegogo:

Bugs are delicious. Wait, what?

We know, the idea can seem surprising at first. But the insects as food movement is gaining steam. The United Nations believes it has major potential to address the food security issues resulting from climate change and dwindling resources. The market has also responded. More and more companies are developing cricket brownies, crackers, and energy bars!

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February 26, 2016   Comments Off on GrowHop: Urban Cricket Farm & FoodLab