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Category — Planning

Urban Farming Expands in South Dallas

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It has been nine months since the City of Dallas put more than $3 million on the line to lure a grocer to South Dallas. Surprisingly, no one has accepted the offer.

By Courtney Gilmore
NBCDFW
Feb 10, 2017

Excerpt:

City leaders are now looking for alternative solutions to bring fresh produce into food desert communities.

“If we can’t get the big grocery stores to come in, then we grow our on,” said Wilson.

Currently, they are scouting a few places to start an urban farm. There is a lot of land in south Dallas and the area is prime for redevelopment.

[Read more →]

February 17, 2017   No Comments

Canada: Surrey, BC launches ‘land-linking’ website focusing on farming

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A map from a new “land-leasing” website, created by the City of Surrey in partnership with a Young Agrarians group.— Image Credit: FarmableNOW.ca

“The cost of buying land in the Lower Mainland is high. Resources like this one are going to help more farmers access land.”

By Amy Reid
Surrey Now
Feb 16, 2017

Excerpt:

A website that’s been almost two years in the making aims to change Surrey’s agricultural future for the better.

The new “land-linking” website, created by the City of Surrey and a Young Agrarians group, aims to connect landowners with farmers.

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February 17, 2017   No Comments

Canada: Urban agriculture comes to London, Ontario

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The Urban Roots London founders (L-R: Heather Barnes, Graham Bracken, Jeremy Horrell and Richie Bloomfield) in the snow. Courtesy of Curtis Justrabo.

“They realized they were in town for university, they wanted to contribute to the community in the meaningful way. That work fed a community; they’re committed to a system to improve it,” says Barnes.

By Ellis Koifman
The Gazette
Feb 12, 2017

Excerpt:

Last November, Heather Barnes and Graham Bracken, two former Western students in law and economics/philosophy respectively, were inspired by the Michigan Urban Farming Initiative (MUFI).

“They grow a lot of food organically and they funnel it right back into the community,” says Barnes. “While we were there people walked up [to the urban farm] and they walked away with food.”

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February 16, 2017   No Comments

Forum in Kigali, Rwanda: Growing Food In African Cities

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The State Minister for Agriculture, Fulgence Nsengiyumva, said at the event that there are about 450 hectares of marshlands developed for agriculture in Kigali City.

The Exchange
Feb 9, 2017

Excerpt:

Dr. Athanase Mukuralinda, World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) Rwanda Country representative, said that cities can for instance have vegetable gardens which can contribute to their food needs.

FAO Rwanda representative Attaher Maiga said that city dwellers can also engage in fish farming, which can be done in small spaces and can help reduce food insecurity.

Rwanda’s population is growing by 2.5 percent per year.

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February 15, 2017   No Comments

University of Arizona: Urban agriculture: feeding the future

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Video Interviews

Directed and edited by Logan Nagel
Interviews conducted by Chandler Donald
Videography by Aiden Vens
Arizona Daily Wildcat
Feb 4, 2017

University of Arizona – Tucson – Spring 2017. In light of a campus-wide rooftop garden design competition, we spoke with a number of experts about their thoughts on landscape architecture, growing food, and nature in cities.

February 11, 2017   No Comments

Canadian Mayors Discuss Growing Food In Their Cities

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250 attend Forum. Debate on local food production between Morinville Mayor Lisa Holmes, Enoch Cree Nation Chief Billy Morin, Sturgeon County Mayor Tom Flynn and Edmonton Mayor Don Iveson at Edmonton’s city hall.

Edmonton could become the food capital of Canada if it taps into the power of urban agriculture, suggests a recent mayoral forum.

By Kevin Ma
St. Albert Gazette
Feb 8, 2017

Excerpt:

Morin said that to his community of Enoch, local food was about culture. Alberta’s First Nations were only recently introduced to Western foods such as flour, and today grappled with many health concerns related to diet. He now seeks to lead his community back to its traditional dietary roots.

“Picking berries, hunting moose – those are medicines for us.”

Holmes also cited a need to reconnect with the past when it came to food, saying that there was a “lost generation” of people today that did not grow up tending gardens or preserving food.

[Read more →]

February 9, 2017   No Comments

15-Acre Urban Community Garden in Mid-Town Phoenix Ordered to Close

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azfamily.com 3TV | Phoenix Breaking News, Weather, Sport

The Department of Interior ordered the lot to be vacant.

By Janessa Hilliard
Phoenix New Times
Feb 3, 2017

Excerpt:

Community gardeners are being asked to have their plots cleared by Friday, February 10, and the entire site is to be vacated by Wednesday, February 15. It is unclear what will become of the acreage, which sits along the northeast side of the intersection, bordering Steele Indian School Park.

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February 5, 2017   Comments Off on 15-Acre Urban Community Garden in Mid-Town Phoenix Ordered to Close

Slovenia: Urban agriculture for changing cities: governance models for better institutional capacities and social inclusion

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Velenje, Slovenia. Click on image for larger file.

Employ Participatory Urban and Peri-urban agriculture (UPA) as a powerful and emerging method to improve public institutional capacities in order to tackle socio-economic exclusion of vulnerable/marginalized groups and to stimulate sustainable urban development in the Danube region.

14 February 2017 at 9:30
Velenje, Stari trg 3, Vila Bianca
Research Centre of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts

Excerpt:

In recent times, the main needs and challenges related to governance systems within the Danube region can be associated with decreasing public institutional capacities to incorporate participatory approach into decision-making processes. The absence of participatory mechanisms is contributing to reduced motivation of people to engage in governance and administration because they feel relegated from political, social and economic agendas and not competent enough to act as an equivalent counterpart and a considerable driver of “change”.

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February 4, 2017   Comments Off on Slovenia: Urban agriculture for changing cities: governance models for better institutional capacities and social inclusion

By 2030 Megacities May Devour More Than 86 Million Acres of Prime Farmland

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Click on image for larger file. Maps show where projected urban expansion until 2030 is expected to result in cropland loss. Competing areas (red) hold croplands but have a high probability (>75%; medium scenario) of becoming urbanized by 2030.

Urban agriculture, the expansion of farming into areas farther from urban centers, and farming intensification practices (such as the heavy use of fertilizers), will offset some of the loss of farmland, say the scientists.

By Andrew Amelinckx
Modern Farmer
January 27, 2017
(Must read. Mike)

Excerpt:

The study, “Future urban land expansion and implications for global croplands,” published last month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, finds that by 2030, as much as 86.5 million acres of productive farmland worldwide—between two and four percent of total farmland—will be lost as the world’s so called mega-cities, generally defined as being more than ten million residents, and the adjoining areas, called “mega urban regions,” take over prime agricultural croplands to make room for a growing population and their activities.

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January 29, 2017   Comments Off on By 2030 Megacities May Devour More Than 86 Million Acres of Prime Farmland

Kansas City: Future of Westside Community Farm uncertain as city council mulls budget cut

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Sharda says his agency has assisted 260 community groups establish gardens, where crops are often donated to less-fortunate families.

By Sean Mcdowell
Fox 4
Jan 17, 2017

Excerpt:

On Tuesday morning, over 100 people packed into the city council’s Housing Committee Meeting at City Hall. Many attendees came to show support for Kansas City Community Gardens, demonstrating how their groups have benefitted from the council’s funding.

Kansas City’s Council currently provides Kansas City Community Gardens with $78,000 annually. If the proposed cuts take effect, that total would shrink to only $45,000.

[Read more →]

January 26, 2017   Comments Off on Kansas City: Future of Westside Community Farm uncertain as city council mulls budget cut

South L.A. “Gangsta Gardener” Ron Finley Fights to Save His Garden From Eviction

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Ron Finley in his gangsta garden.By Ryan Orange for LA Weekly.

The Ron Finley Project, the non-profit that drew international recognition for its community garden in South Los Angeles, is facing eviction from the land where founder Ron Finley first planted seeds in 2010.

By Jennifer Swann
La Weekly
January 6, 2017

Excerpt:

After years of financial problems, the property on Exposition Boulevard was purchased at a foreclosure auction by the real estate investment company Strategic Acquisitions for $379,003 last November, according to L.A. County records. But Finley, the longtime activist and self-described “gangsta gardener” who had been leasing the property, is not leaving his garden — and the community it serves — without a fight.

“They’re used to people caving in and we’re not planning on caving in,” he told the Weekly. “What I try to do is the right thing, and I’m confident in that. You can take all you want, but you can’t take my soul.”

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January 14, 2017   Comments Off on South L.A. “Gangsta Gardener” Ron Finley Fights to Save His Garden From Eviction

Afghanistan: I can grow vegetables to feed my family and from the surplus I can even make a small profit

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Assadulah in his greenhouse. Foto: PIN Archive.

The EU funded project lasted for 28 months and in total supported over 1000 low income households, specifically focusing on women with particularly limited access to income generating activities.

People in Need Czech Republic
2017
(Must see. Mike)

Excerpts:

Assadullah has been selected as beneficiary of a project tackling urban poverty in Mazar-i-Sharif in Northern Afghanistan, undertaken by People in Need and funded by the European Union. One of the project activities is focused on kitchen gardening.

Assadullah’s life changed a great deal since he started cultivating the small garden behind his house. “Before I joined the project I did not have enough information about agricultural activities and did not know even know what a greenhouse is,” describes Assadullah. “Previously our daily diet did not include vegetables and if we had guests we had to buy vegetables in the market,” he adds.

[Read more →]

January 13, 2017   Comments Off on Afghanistan: I can grow vegetables to feed my family and from the surplus I can even make a small profit

Interdisciplinary University project creates model to predict land use, climate effects and even potential profit of farming in cities

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Volunteers help prepare soil and beds at the Spaces of Opportunity urban farm in Phoenix, Arizona.

The model will look at what would happen if vacant land in a city were turned into urban farms, which could produce food for the neighbors and help mitigate the urban heat-island effect, in which concrete and asphalt stay warmer overnight, raising temperatures. Conversely, plants and trees allow desert land to cool at night.

By Mary Beth Faller
Arizona State University
Jan 5, 2017

Excerpt:

As Phoenix continues to sprawl toward Tucson, urban planners are working to prevent the entire 100-mile corridor between Arizona’s largest metro areas from becoming nothing but concrete and asphalt.

Unfettered development, experts say, can strain resources and increase temperatures and pollution, setting off a chain reaction of problems for the region and its residents.

[Read more →]

January 12, 2017   Comments Off on Interdisciplinary University project creates model to predict land use, climate effects and even potential profit of farming in cities

Book: Urban Agriculture for Growing City Regions – Connecting Urban-Rural Spheres in Casablanca

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The example of Casablanca, one of the fastest growing cities in North Africa

Edited by Undine Giseke, Maria Gerster-Bentaya, Frank Helten, Matthias Kraume, Dieter Scherer, Guido Spars, Fouad Amraoui, Abdelaziz Adidi, Said Berdouz, Mohemed Chlaida, Majid Mansour, Mohamed Mdafai
Routledge
2015

This book demonstrates how agriculture can play a determining role in sustainable, climate-optimised urban development. Agriculture within urban growth centres today is more than an economic or social left-over or a niche practice. It is instead a complex system that offers multiple potentials for tomorrow’s megacities. Urban open space and agriculture can be connected to productive urban landscapes – this forms new urban-rural linkages in the urban region and helps shape the city. But in order to do this, agriculture has to be seen as an integral part of the urban fabric and it has to be put on the local agenda.

[Read more →]

January 12, 2017   Comments Off on Book: Urban Agriculture for Growing City Regions – Connecting Urban-Rural Spheres in Casablanca

Venezuela: Urban Agriculture and the Production of Plenty for the Man

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Minister Lorena Freitez (fourth from the right) among dozens of others holding up pots with growing seedlings (Lorena Freitez). Click on image for larger file.

We have won the world’s first Ministry of Urban Agriculture, which not only holds a new possibility for a healthier, humane and economic agriculture, but also a niche from which to build the foundations for new forms of production that guarantee greater sovereignty.

By Lorena Freitez
Minister Of Popular Power For Urban Agriculture
Venezuela Analysis
January 6th 2017
(Must see. Mike)

Excerpt:

The first major mission of the Ministry of Popular Power for Urban Agriculture (MINPPAU) was precisely this: 29,426 productive units were registered throughout the country, bringing together 100,000 people motivated to produce, through activating the Urban Agriculture National Registry. We prioritized 10 of the largest and most populated cities from across the country in order not to distract us from urban areas and we proposed 13 short cycle vegetables with the clear intention of having the first harvest sown in these cities between 90 and 100 days and with a minimum output (50 kg of seeds and 104,000 tomato seedlings), the production of 377 tonnes of vegetables (tomatoes, eggplants, paprika, peppers, radishes, lettuce, among others) and that the produce could all be eaten at the close of the 100 day agro-urban production campaign.

This first campaign “100 Days for Urban Agriculture” was nothing more than a strategy to visualize and accompany a new political-productive “agro-urban” Venezuelan subject who, synthesizing the best of the countryside and the city, entered into economic democratization disputes. In 100 days: 1) we knew the potential of urban agriculture in Venezuela, mapping those committed to agriculture and militant in those cities; 2) we visualized the people’s capacity to solve problems; 3) we awakened restlessness and enthusiasm in those indifferent or skeptical about these new forms, subjects and productive spaces; 4) we identified the main challenges of sustainable and humane agriculture in cities.

[Read more →]

January 7, 2017   Comments Off on Venezuela: Urban Agriculture and the Production of Plenty for the Man