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Category — Roof Garden

Brooklyn AirBnB: Stylish Room w/ Rooftop Community Garden & Lounge

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Enjoy the rooftop garden, lounge and hammock while the sunsets over the Manhattan skyline.

AirBnB
Brooklyn, New York

From the ad:

Bushwick is the new Williamsburg. Named the trendiest neighbourhood in Brooklyn, the area is filled with cool cafes, bars, restaurants, vintage stores and street-art. Enjoy the rooftop garden, lounge and hammock while the sunsets over the Manhattan skyline. The apartment is a 5 minute walk to the Dekalb L stop and Myrtle-Wyckoff M stop – a 15 min subway to Manhattan. Grab your morning coffee from Variety, dance the night away at House of Yes, enjoy pizza at OPS and browse L Train Vintage.

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January 21, 2017   No Comments

Bengaluru’s oldest urban farmer leads the way in sustainable living

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Anusuya Sharma’s terrace farm grows everything from leafy veggies to medicinal plants and herbs.

“The fresh chemical-free vegetables grown at home reduces my family’s carbon foot print, a core issue in global warming,” Anusuya says.

By Theja Ram
The News Minute
Jan 14, 2017

Excerpt:

“When I got married, I moved to Bombay. There were no plants in peoples’ homes and barely any space to live. I still nurtured a few plants on the balcony of our rented home. After 13 years, we moved to Hyderabad and the situation there was the opposite of Bombay. Almost every home there had a kitchen garden. I brought a few pots and began cultivating plants,” said Anusuya.

Anusuya and her family moved to Bengaluru in 1987 and it was at the city’s famous Lalbagh that the veteran farmer learned the intricacies of urban agriculture.

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January 20, 2017   No Comments

Risks in urban rooftop agriculture: Assessing stakeholders’ perceptions to ensure efficient policymaking

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Cartoonist: Jorodo.

Key stakeholders in Berlin and Barcelona perceive several risks associated with rooftop agriculture.

By Kathrin Spechta, Esther Sanyé-Mengualc
Environmental Science and Policy
March 2017

Abstract:

Rooftop agriculture (RA) is an innovative form of urban agriculture that takes advantage of unused urban spaces while promoting local food production. However, the implementation of RA projects is limited due to stakeholders’ perceived risks. Such risks should be addressed and minimized in policymaking processes to ensure the sustainable deployment of RA initiatives. This paper evaluates the risks that stakeholders perceive in RA and compares these perceptions with the currently available knowledge, including scientific literature, practices and market trends. Qualitative interviews with 56 stakeholders from Berlin and Barcelona were analyzed for this purpose.

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January 20, 2017   No Comments

Montreal’s urban agriculture pioneer Lufa Farms opens third rooftop greenhouse farm

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Lauren Rathmell looks at rainbow chard growing on the Lufa Farms rooftop greenhouse on Tuesday January 17, 2017. Pierre Obendrauf / Montreal Gazette

The newest, at 63,000 square feet more than double the size of the first, is the largest.

By Susan Schwartz
Montreal Gazette
Jan 18, 2017

Excerpt:

Last week Lufa Farms began to harvest produce from that greenhouse, set atop an industrial building in Anjou. The first week brought mega-sized radishes, watercress, Persian cress, arugula and spinach from among more than 40 varieties of greens started out there as seedlings in December; this week, tatsoi, red and green bok choy, Chinese cabbage, romaine and Boston lettuce were added to the mix. Next week there will be more.

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January 19, 2017   No Comments

Dublin farmer and the tubers for Mars

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Andrew Douglas, shown with Jayden Whelan, left, and Malena Behan, hopes his potatoes will feed explorers like in The Martian. Photo by Andres Poveda.

Andrew Douglas, a horticulturist who set up Dublin’s first rooftop farm, plans to supply potato pods to a Nasa mission on the slopes of a Hawaiian volcano, where the space agency is simulating life on Mars.

By Gabrielle Monaghan
The Sunday Times Ireland
January 15 2017
(Must see. Mike)

Excerpt:

A version of the Irish potato will boldly go where no spud has gone before — to a Mars simulation habitat run by Nasa.

Andrew Douglas, a horticulturist who set up Dublin’s first rooftop farm, plans to supply potato pods to a Nasa mission on the slopes of a Hawaiian volcano, where the space agency is simulating life on Mars. Nasa is hoping to send humans to the red planet by the 2030s.

In 2013, Douglas set up a kitchen garden on the roof of the Chocolate Factory building in Dublin before moving it to the top-floor science lab at Belvedere­ College. There are now 180 varieties of heritage and heirloom potatoes growing in upcycled water cooler bottles and artificial grass offcuts on the college’s rooftop. “Who better to help experiment with growing spuds on Mars than an Irishman?” said Douglas.

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January 15, 2017   No Comments

Hydroponic farm for refugees, foreign workers launches on Tel Aviv rooftop

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Hydroponic farm for refugees, foreign workers launches on Tel Aviv rooftop. (photo credit:ASSAF OSTROVSKI)

“They don’t have the same language, so they can’t communicate,” urban farming consultant Lavi Kushelevich told The Jerusalem Post on Wednesday. “But they can communicate through food.”

By Sharon Udasin
Jerusalem Post
01/05/2017

Excerpt:

On the toughest street in the toughest neighborhood of south Tel Aviv, Darfurian refugees, Chinese workers and Israelis are working together to make a rooftop blossom.

“They don’t have the same language, so they can’t communicate,” urban farming consultant Lavi Kushelevich told The Jerusalem Post on Wednesday. “But they can communicate through food.”

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January 6, 2017   Comments Off on Hydroponic farm for refugees, foreign workers launches on Tel Aviv rooftop

Cégep du Vieux Montréal built a rooftop garden oasis

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A cement terrace in the middle of the city attracts environmentally conscious students and staff

By Verity Stevenson
MacLeans
January 4, 2017

Excerpt:

Bezançon holds urban agriculture-related workshops during the winter, when there’s no gardening to do, to garner interest in the project and in response to what she says is a growing interest among students to produce their own food. “We eat three or four times a day, so it’s a huge part of our life, and to be able to feed yourself is giving yourself power,” says Bezançon. Student volunteers receive no extra credit for the hours they put in, except for the option of having the commitment mentioned on their report card (most don’t put in the bureaucratic effort to do so).

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January 5, 2017   Comments Off on Cégep du Vieux Montréal built a rooftop garden oasis

Berkeley sprouts creative housing, topped by a working farm

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The rooftops at the Garden Village modular apartment complex on Dwight Way in Berkeley are under cultivation. Photo: Santiago Mejia, The Chronicle.

In all, one-third of an acre of “land” is available for farming.

By John King
San Francisco Chronicle
December 24, 2016
(Must see. Mike)

Excerpt:

Two of the interior pods stop at three levels and are topped by communal terraces that get use throughout the day when studies and weather allow. One more level up, you encounter the startling contrast of panoramic views — and a dissected farm where you can touch the ground or snip off a sprig of parsley.

This time of year, between harvests, some pods show nothing but dirt. Others are softened by abundant mounds of green parsley and purple kale. One roof is dotted with red radishes waiting to be picked.

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December 31, 2016   Comments Off on Berkeley sprouts creative housing, topped by a working farm

Tel Aviv’s rooftop farm grows fresh food for thousands

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© Shani Sadicario — A view of the rooftop garden’s education centre.

Located above the Dizengoff shopping center, this urban farm uses hydroponics to grow vegetables rapidly and organically.

By Katherine Martinko (@feistyredhair)
Living / Green Food
Tree Hugger
December 19, 2016

Excerpt:

As part of a project called ‘Green in the City,’ or Yarok Bair in Hebrew, an urban rooftop farm has been established over the past year. It comprises two commercial greenhouses, totaling 750 square meters (over 8,000 square feet) of growing space, as well as an educational area where citizens can learn urban farming techniques and cooking skills relevant to the vegetables they grow. The organization sells hydroponics units for home use and teaches people how to use them.

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December 27, 2016   Comments Off on Tel Aviv’s rooftop farm grows fresh food for thousands

Rooftop hydroponic systems in cities produce vegetables that are cheaper and healthier than rural farms

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Putting roots down on rooftops. (Reuters/Vincent Kessler)

After calculating the cost of building the screenhouse and tanks, rent, labor, utilities, seeds, fertilizer, and other equipment, the team from the Chinese Academy of Sciences South China Botanical Garden and the Zhong Kai University of Agriculture and Engineering found that six out of the seven vegetables were cheaper to produce than to purchase at a local store.

By Kelsey Lindsey
Quartz
Dec 14

Excerpt:

On a 1,600-square-foot-rooftop in Guangzhou, China, 14 hydroponic tanks produce hundreds of pounds of vegetables a year, with a potential profit of over $6,000 annually—almost twice the 2015 annual minimum wage in the city, which has one of the highest monthly minimum wages in the country. The hydroponic tanks are part of study that shows residents and developers in Guangzhou that their rooftop space might be worth some green.

A paper published this past July the journal Agronomy for Sustainable Development reports that growing leafy greens in rooftop hydroponic systems can not only produce a steady supply of vegetables—it can also be cheaper than buying store-bought alternatives.

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December 15, 2016   Comments Off on Rooftop hydroponic systems in cities produce vegetables that are cheaper and healthier than rural farms

Hands-on Rooftop Food Production and Learning at Trent University

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trerioof

With this Urban Roof Top Farm, Trent University in Ontario was ahead of the curve as they were one of the first one’s successfully growing crops on the roof on a larger scale.

By Jelle Vonk
Living Architecture Monitor
Winter 2016
Page 17

Excerpt:

Through the efforts of Dr. Tom Hutchinson, Professor Emeritus, this intensive green roof also provides ongoing research into the deleterious effects of ground level ozone on crop production and provides students with an opportunity to study the potential of plants to filter out sir pollutants.

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December 13, 2016   Comments Off on Hands-on Rooftop Food Production and Learning at Trent University

Terrace gardener in Bengaluru, India

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terr
Click on image for larger file.

Kiran grows custard apple, rose apple, water apple, jamun, passion fruit, fig, yellow and red dragon fruits, grapes, papaya, carambola (star fruit), avocado, banana, orange, lemon, sapota (sapodilla), pomegranate, apple ber, guava and five varieties of cherry.

By Seema S Hegde
Deccan Herald
Nov 18, 2016

Excerpt:

Meet Kiran C Pattar. A believer in unconventional education, he has been practising terrace gardening for the past seven years. Kiran has a garden of about 400 square feet on his terrace, where he grows 25 varieties of fruits. He uses empty paint buckets and large containers to grow fruits and vegetables. He has also constructed beds for the plants using bricks, all by himself. Since he believes in the “do it yourself” attitude, he started to build the brick structures on his own and completed them successfully. He says, “It was really a fulfilling experience, although it took me quite a lot of time to complete.”

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December 6, 2016   Comments Off on Terrace gardener in Bengaluru, India

China’s CCTV News visits Singapore: Urban farming provides sustainable solutions

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“The edible garden certainly sounds like a good idea. But it’ll be difficult to develop bigger farms there, considering how small the country is. Is that right?”

Correspondent Miro Lu from Singapore
China CCTV News
Nov 28, 2016

Singapore produces very little of the food it consumes, but the city-state is now trying to become less dependent on food imports. Some people now want to make the garden city into an edible garden city, and they’re trying to teach more people how to grow their own food locally.

Link to more complete video story.

December 4, 2016   Comments Off on China’s CCTV News visits Singapore: Urban farming provides sustainable solutions

Michigan Urban Farming Initiative will transform a vacant apartment building into a community center and cafe

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detco
A rendering of what the future community resource center and food cafe will look like on Brush Street in Detroit’s North End. Photo by Dave Darovitz/Global Product Development Communications. Click on image for larger file.

“This is part of a larger trend occurring across the country in which people are redefining what life in the urban environment looks like.”

By Chris Ehrmann
Crains Detroit
Nov 31, 2016

Excerpt:

The nonprofit on Wednesday announced the support of BASF SE and Sustainable Brands, a global community of business innovators, which will help renovate the 3,200-square-foot three-story apartment building at 7432 Brush St. and across from MUFI’s 2-acre urban garden. It will house commercial kitchens that will service the planned cafe and allow for future production and packaging of goods for the organization. Other new amenities being developed include a children’s learning sensory garden.

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December 1, 2016   Comments Off on Michigan Urban Farming Initiative will transform a vacant apartment building into a community center and cafe

Green acres are flourishing on campus rooftops across Canada

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macroof
Elevator pitch: Arlene Throness of Ryerson’s farm, originally proposed by architect students (Mark Blinch/Ryerson University) Click on image for larger file.

Sustainability-minded green roof projects are appearing from Montreal’s Concordia to the University of Saskatchewan

By Leanne Delap
Macleans
November 28, 2016

Excerpt:

And at the University of Saskatchewan, an opportunity arose on top of the phytotron (a research greenhouse). The condensers were moved, leaving a bare expanse visible from an open walkway.

“Aha,” said Grant Wood, a professor of urban agriculture, who worked with the university’s office of sustainability to come up with “the rooftop.” After getting the engineering students to check on load-bearing weights, and “a lot of paperwork,” says Wood, pallets and recycled containers were moved onto the roof. The team started with 500 sq. feet of planting, for a yield of about a thousand pounds of produce this past year; the goal is to double that next year.

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November 29, 2016   Comments Off on Green acres are flourishing on campus rooftops across Canada