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Category — thesis

Brazil: Public action and networks around Urban Agriculture in Sao Paulo, Montreal and Toronto

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Work in progress: Documentary about urban food systems in Brazil, Canada and France.

Thesis – Redes, Ideias E Ação Pública Na Agricultura Urbana: São Paulo, Montreal E Toronto. São Paulo 2017

By Lya Cynthia Porto De Oliveira
Public Administration and Government Study Center, at Getulio Vargas Foundation, Sao Paulo, Brazil
Paper is in Portuguese.

Abstract:

This thesis deals with an analysis of different Urban Agriculture (UA) models of public action. The theoretical model adopted is the cognitive analysis of public action, based on Pierre Muller and Yves Surel, and the actor-network theory by Bruno Latour. The purpose of the thesis is to understand the relationship dynamics between ideas, organizations, networks of action and results in the field of UA public action.

The results are understood as basic services for Urban Agriculture, that were defined according to the literature analysis in this field, and it can be offered by state and/or civil society organizations. Based on the literature review of 21 different cities, four different types of public action were identified.

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June 23, 2017   No Comments

The trouble with temporary: Impacts and pitfalls of a meanwhile community garden in Wythenshawe, South Manchester

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The Macmillan community garden polytunnel.

This paper focuses on research conducted at a community garden in Wythenshawe, established by Real Food Wythenshawe as an example of a ‘meanwhile’ or temporary growing site for people affected by cancer.

By Rebecca St. Clair, Michael Hardman, Richard P. Armitage and Graeme Sherriff
Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems
Cambridge University Press
June 6, 2017

Abstract:

The rise of Urban Agriculture projects across the UK has led to a surge of interest in their efficacy and resulting social impacts. Real Food Wythenshawe is a Lottery-funded urban food project in the UK that aims to teach the population of Wythenshawe to grow their own food and to cook from scratch. The area, popularly referred to as ‘Europe’s largest council estate’, suffers from high levels of deprivation and has been described as a ‘food desert’ due to a perceived lack of access to fresh fruit and vegetables (Small World Consulting, 2013). In order to encourage Wythenshawe residents to grow their own food and to increase access to fresh fruit and vegetables, Real Food Wythenshawe aims to transform unused areas of land into growing spaces, such as allotments and community gardens.

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June 12, 2017   No Comments

The potential for urban household vegetable gardens to reduce greenhouse gas emissions

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David Cleveland in his home garden. Photo Credit: Daniela Soleri

UCSB research professor David Cleveland and his students model the effect of household gardens on greenhouse gas emissions

By Julie Cohen
The UC Santa Barbara Current
September 6, 2016
(Must see. Mike)

Excerpt:

Want to help mitigate global climate change? Grow some veggies.

Turning lawn into a vegetable garden can reduce greenhouse gas emissions, according to a new study by UC Santa Barbara research professor David Cleveland.

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April 15, 2017   Comments Off on The potential for urban household vegetable gardens to reduce greenhouse gas emissions

Fonctionnement Et Durabilité des micro-fermes urbaines

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Une Observation Participative Sur Le Cas Des Fermes Franciliennes

By Anne-Cécile Daniel
Ingénieure d’études en Agriculture Urbaine
Étude Menée Dans Le Cadre De La Chaire Eco-Conception Avec
Agroparistech Et L’équipe Agricultures Urbaines (Sad-Apt, Inra)
Mars 2017

Introduction:

Si l’agriculture urbaine est une notion de plus en plus évoquée par les institutions, les entreprises, les associations, les collectivités, les citoyens, les politiques, c’est qu’elle a certainement l’audace de vouloir créer une intelligence commune entre l’aména¬gement urbain et l’activité agricole et jardinière. Autrement dit, il s’agit d’offrir des solutions concrètes pour rendre nos villes plus durables et vivables. Dans une autre mesure, l’agri¬culture urbaine s’apparente à une des solutions possibles pour préparer les villes au changement climatique et tendre vers des systèmes alimentaires locaux.

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March 10, 2017   Comments Off on Fonctionnement Et Durabilité des micro-fermes urbaines

Assessment of Soil Health in Urban Agriculture: Soil Enzymes and Microbial Properties

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The addition of organic fertilizers tended to increase most enzyme activities and available nutrients in the soils, as compared to that of inorganic fertilizers

By Avanthi Deshani Igalavithana, Sang Soo Lee, Nabeel Khan Niazi, Young-Han Lee, Kye Hoon Kim, Jeoung-Hun Park, Deok Hyun Moon, and Yong Sik Ok
Sustainability
Feb 20, 2017

Abstract:

Urban agriculture has been recently highlighted with the increased importance for recreation in modern society; however, soil quality and public health may not be guaranteed because of continuous exposure to various pollutants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the soil quality of urban agriculture by soil microbial assessments. Two independent variables, organic and inorganic fertilizers, were considered. The activities of soil enzymes including dehydrogenase, ?-glucosidase, arylsulfatase, urease, alkaline and acid phosphatases were used as indicators of important microbial mediated functions and the soil chemical properties were measured in the soils applied with organic or inorganic fertilizer for 10 years. Fatty acid methyl ester analysis was applied to determine the soil microbial community composition.

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February 25, 2017   Comments Off on Assessment of Soil Health in Urban Agriculture: Soil Enzymes and Microbial Properties

Indigenous Wild Food Plants In Home Gardens

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Improving Health And Income With The Assistance Of Agricultural Extension

By Robert L. Freedman, Tucson, Arizona.
International Journal of Agricultural Extension
2015. 63-71

Abstract:

The wide spread presence of home gardens in developing nations is a strong foundation for food security, both in terms of quantity and quality. Indigenous wild food plants are a rich source of health-giving micronutrients, which are missing from highly refined fast/convenience foods the growing reliance on which has caused an ever-increasing occurrence of dietary-related diseases.

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February 23, 2017   Comments Off on Indigenous Wild Food Plants In Home Gardens

Call for papers: “Assessing the Sustainability of Urban Agriculture: Methodological Advances and Case Studies”

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Dr. Esther Sanyé-Mengual. MSCA fellow. Research centre in urban environment for agriculture and biodiversity (ResCUE-AB). Department of Agricultural Sciences (Dipsa). Università di Bologna

For the special issue of the MDPI journal Sustainability

Dr. Esther Sanyé-Mengual
Guest Editor,
email: esther.sanye(at)unibo.it
Sustainability

This Special Issue calls for papers that contribute to the assessment of the sustainability of urban agriculture, both by advancing methodological approaches and by providing results from case studies. Cities have been identified as an essential element in addressing global concerns, particularly due to the growing population, and food flow is key in the urban metabolism and in the design of future sustainable cities. Resulting from the environmental awareness of the globalized food system and urban social and economic gaps, urban agriculture has grown in recent years aiming at increasing food security while coping with climate change.

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February 23, 2017   Comments Off on Call for papers: “Assessing the Sustainability of Urban Agriculture: Methodological Advances and Case Studies”

Du Jardinage Au Paysage

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parisg Click on image for larger file.

Comment les jardiniers des jardins associatifs contribuent-ils à la construction de paysages alimentaires ?

Par Anne-Cécile DANIEL
AGROCAMPUS OUESTCentre d’Angers – Institut National d’Horticulture et de Paysage
2011-2012

Excerpt:

« Ilots de verdure » situés généralement en milieu urbain ou périurbain, les jardins associatifs sont des espaces sur lesquels des individus membres d’un groupe associatif pratiquent le jardinage. On y cultive principalement des légumes, fruits, condiments et fleurs, mais aussi des éléments qui vont bien au-delà des plantes cultivées, comme les liens sociaux, les loisirs, l’éducation à l’environnement, la citoyenneté etc. Gérés par des associations, ces espaces peuvent être sous forme de parcelles collectives ou bien délimités en plusieurs lopins de terre individualisés, et ce, pour la grande joie des personnes qui y ont accès.

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November 12, 2016   Comments Off on Du Jardinage Au Paysage

Journal: Urban Agriculture & Regional Food Systems

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urbjorn

Volume 1 Issue 1, July 2016

Urban Agriculture & Regional Food Systems, formerly published by Baltzer Science Publishers, recently joined the ACSESS portfolio of agricultural and environmental journals.
The Journal is supported by RUAF.

Urban Agriculture & Regional Food Systems is a multi-disciplinary, peer-reviewed and open access journal focusing on urban and peri-urban agriculture and systems of urban and regional food provisioning in developing, transition, and advanced economies.

The journal intends to be a platform for cutting edge research on urban and peri-urban agricultural production for food and non-food (e.g. flowers, medicine, cosmetics) uses and for social, environmental and health services (e.g. tourism, water storage, care, education, waste recycling, urban greening). It aims to explore, analyse and critically reflect upon urban and regional food production, processing, transport, trade, marketing and consumption and the social, economic, environmental, health and spatial contexts, relations and impacts of these food provisioning activities.

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October 30, 2016   Comments Off on Journal: Urban Agriculture & Regional Food Systems

Honeybees pick up host of agricultural, urban pesticides via non-crop plants

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perdyEntomologist Christian Krupke at the Purdue Bee Laboratory with pollen collected by Indiana honeybees. (Purdue Agriculture photo/Tom Campbell)

Agricultural chemicals are only part of the problem. Homeowners and urban landscapes are big contributors, even when hives are directly adjacent to crop fields.”

By Keith Robinson
Purdue University
May 31, 2016

Excerpts:

“Although crop pollen was only a minor part of what they collected, bees in our study were exposed to a far wider range of chemicals than we expected,” said Krupke. “The sheer numbers of pesticides we found in pollen samples were astonishing. Agricultural chemicals are only part of the problem. Homeowners and urban landscapes are big contributors, even when hives are directly adjacent to crop fields.”

Long, now an assistant professor of entomology at The Ohio State University, said she was also “surprised and concerned” by the diversity of pesticides found in pollen.

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June 4, 2016   Comments Off on Honeybees pick up host of agricultural, urban pesticides via non-crop plants

Report: Community and home gardens increase vegetable intake and food security of residents in San Jose, California

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mesaThe La Mesa Verde program in San Jose helps low-income families to establish their own vegetable gardens. A pilot study found that gardening in either a community or backyard space made a significant contribution to gardeners’ daily vegetable intake.

“Gardening made a substantial contribution to vegetable intake regardless of socioeconomic background or previous gardening experience,” said co-author Lucy Diekmann, a postdoctoral researcher in the Food and Agribusiness Institute at Santa Clara University.

By Susan Algert, UC ANR Cooperative Extension
Lucy Diekmann, Santa Clara University
Leslie Gray, Santa Clara University
Marian Renvall, UC San Diego Department of Medicine
California Agriculture 70(2):77-82. DOI: 10.3733/ca.v070n02p77.
April-June 2016.
(Must read. Mike.)

Abstract:

As of 2013, 42 million American households were involved in growing their own food either at home or in a community garden plot. The purpose of this pilot study was to document the extent to which gardeners, particularly less affluent ones, increase their vegetable intake when eating from either home or community garden spaces. Eighty-five community gardeners and 50 home gardeners from San Jose, California, completed a survey providing information on demographic background, self-rated health, vegetable intake and the benefits of gardening.

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June 4, 2016   Comments Off on Report: Community and home gardens increase vegetable intake and food security of residents in San Jose, California

Sudan: Urban Agriculture Facing Land Pressure in Greater Khartoum – The Case of New Real Estate Projects in Tuti and Abu Se ‘id

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sudan

Dr Alice Franck’s Presentation On Urban Agriculture At The Sudanese Institute Of Architects (SIA)’S 4Th Scientific And Professional Conference

On 23rd May, 2016, Dr Alice Franck, Geographer and Coordinator of CEDEJ Khartoum, presented her paper at the Sudanese Institute of Architects (SIA)’s 4th Scientific and Professional conference.

Excerpt from Abstract:

My initial research into this location of intense speculation examined the future of the central areas that remained under agricultural activity and how they were gradually being transformed into urban areas (Franck 2007). The approach adopted analysed the resistance of agriculture and farmers to the spread of real estate and the pressure of competition over land ownership. Five years later, the action in favour of urban plan renewal has been drastically intensified and the capacity for resistance severely diminished; three of the five market gardening areas (Tuti, Shambat, Abu Se’id, Abu Rof and Mogran) observed during fieldwork in 2001–5 are subject to huge real estate projects (Mogran, Abu Se’id and Tuti). In this chapter, I focus my analysis on how landowners and the entire agricultural sector can both adapt to and confront the transformation.

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May 26, 2016   Comments Off on Sudan: Urban Agriculture Facing Land Pressure in Greater Khartoum – The Case of New Real Estate Projects in Tuti and Abu Se ‘id

A local lady and scholar, Dr Hangwelani Hope Magidimisha, made history when she became the first black woman to get a PhD in Urban Planning at the University of Kwazulu Natal.

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phdladyDr Hangwelani Hope Magidimisha..

Her Masters Thesis: The responsiveness of town planning to urban agriculture in low-income neighbourhoods : a case study of Kwa-Mashu in Durban, South Africa.

Excerpt about her academic journey:

A resident of the rural Ngudza village, Magidimisha stated that her motivation to study and work hard came from her uneducated parents. “I am from a humble beginning with supportive parents and a supportive community,” she said. “When I was in Grade 12 at Ramugondo Secondary, our school achieved a 100% pass rate for the first time in history. We were a highly motivated class. This was also the motivation for me; it just proved to me that the sky is the limit.”

She indicated that hard work had always had a way of paying off. “If I work hard, anything is possible,” she beamed. “I like doing what people think is impossible. I guess this is something I got from my father.”

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May 6, 2016   Comments Off on A local lady and scholar, Dr Hangwelani Hope Magidimisha, made history when she became the first black woman to get a PhD in Urban Planning at the University of Kwazulu Natal.

A meta-analysis of urban and peri-urban agriculture and forestry in mediating climate change

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forestc

Africa is undergoing an unprecedented urban transition both in pace and scale.

By Shuaib Lwasa, Frank Mugagga1, Bolanle Wahab,
David Simon, John P Connors and Corrie Griffith
Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability
2015, 13:68–73

Abstract:

This paper systematically reviews literature on urban and peri-urban agriculture and forestry (UPAF) in mediating climate change. The study includes both peer-reviewed and grey literature (274 literature sources), and synthesizes evidence and agreement on both UPAF’s potential and limitations for mitigating and adapting to climate change. Eight East and West African cities were included in the review: Accra, Addis Ababa, Dakar, Dar es Salaam, Douala, Kampala, Ibadan and Nairobi. The review focuses on urban livelihoods, ecosystem services and urban policy responses as pathways to mediating climate change.

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May 3, 2016   Comments Off on A meta-analysis of urban and peri-urban agriculture and forestry in mediating climate change

Toward Sustainability: Novelties, Areas of Learning and Innovation in Urban Agriculture

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jumplGraphic from: If You Plant a Seed by Nadir Nelson.

The described novelties include approaches to enhance the positive impacts of practicing agriculture within urban areas, and some of them have the potential to contribute to societal change and open up opportunities for social learning processes.

By Ina Opitz, Kathrin Specht, Regine Berges, Rosemarie Siebert and Annette Piorr
Sustainability
Vol 8 Iss 4
Apr 1, 2016

Abstract:

Given the search for new solutions to better prepare cities for the future, in recent years, urban agriculture (UA) has gained in relevance. Within the context of UA, innovative organizational and technical approaches are generated and tested. They can be understood as novelties that begin a potential innovation process. This empirical study is based on 17 qualitative interviews in the U.S. (NYC; Philadelphia, PA, USA; Chicago, IL, USA). The aim was to identify: (i) the most relevant areas of learning and innovation; (ii) the drivers of innovation; (iii) the applied novelties and their specific approach to overcoming the perceived obstacles;

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April 15, 2016   Comments Off on Toward Sustainability: Novelties, Areas of Learning and Innovation in Urban Agriculture