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Category — Urban Farm

Nevada: Brothel partners with city to create 100 acre garden to feed the needy

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“Most of the brothels are great community partners,” he said.

By Denise Rosch
3 News
Sept. 12, 2016

Excerpt:

“We have a lot of veterans who depend on this food bank. Some are in their 80’s. They have enough money for rent and utilities and that’s it. They’re here every week getting food,” said Hampton.

Next year, fresh vegetables could be added to the grocery list. Just down the road from the VFW, Sheri’s Ranch hopes a community garden will help alleviate the strain on the food bank. The local brothel plans to donate about 100 acres of land to make the project happen. The business said it is even willing to provide the water. Nye County Commissioner Dan Schinhofen is helping to coordinate the project.

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September 19, 2016   No Comments

Chicago: 28–year-old master gardener started three organic urban farms

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“It definitely keeps you sane when you’re in an urban environment that is sometimes full of conflict.”

By Amy Rutledge
WGN TV
Sept 12, 2016

Excerpt:

While the community is labeled a “food desert,” Stephanie and her helpers – many of them special needs students– teach kids and adults in the neighborhood how to grow food to feed their own families or even supplement their income.

Together with resident Godwin Akpan, who manages a neighborhood food bank, Dunn is spreading healthy food across the area. They’re even hosting their first big farmers market this fall, which they hope sales will raise money to expand the urban gardening and farming initiative.

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September 18, 2016   No Comments

Urban Farming in Hartford, Connecticut Helps Locals, Growers Improve Their Lives

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Knox, Inc. provides gardening space to 500 farmers throughout the region.

By Todd Piro
NBC Connecticut
Sept 9, 2016

Excerpt:

Now, thanks to Knox’s training on how to increase crop yields, along with their help providing business planning and connections, Christian, can feed his neighbors, while growing his own business.

“It turned out many of them did like the idea of taking their garden plots and their growing abilities to the next level,” Ron Pitz, Executive Director of Knox, Inc. said.

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September 17, 2016   No Comments

Ottawa’s ‘Britannia Backyard Edibles’ looking for room to grow their business

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Madeleine Maltby and Matthew Mason-Phillips are working hard to grow their business, Britannia Backyard Edibles. (Laurie Fagan/CBC)

“It’s almost become pathological … Wherever I’m walking or driving I’m always scanning. ‘What kind of backyard is that? What could I grow?'”

By Laurie Fagan
CBC News
Sep 05, 2016

Excerpt:

Along with Madeleine Maltby, 27, Mason-Phillips co-owns Britannia Backyard Edibles, an urban farming operation now in its second year. Together they’ve transformed 10 backyards — and one front yard — into vegetable garden.

Mason-Phillips says there’s a good supply of fertile but underused green space in central Ottawa that could be put to work for food production.

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September 11, 2016   Comments Off on Ottawa’s ‘Britannia Backyard Edibles’ looking for room to grow their business

Vancouver Chefs Grow Their Own

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Andrea Carlson of Burdock & Co. stands amongst the ginger and edible flowers in her restaurant’s urban garden. – Dan Toulgoet photo

Vancouver restaurants are taking the 100-mile diet a step further and growing their own ingredients here in the city

By Robert Mangelsdorf
Westender
Aug 31, 2016

Excerpt:

“Growing the botanicals was definitely something that was instilled in me working at the Sooke Harbour House on Vancouver Island,” she says. “It’s an incredibly inspired place. I learned a ton there, that ethos, and had an opportunity to experience on a daily basis the opportunities of the plants as they present themselves.

“Now it’s about the flower,” she continues, “then it’s the seed, then it’s about the fruit, then it’s the root. It’s not just about saying we have beets and tomatoes to work with. We have this entire world of potential from these plants, that’s what gets me excited when it comes to creating menus.”

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September 1, 2016   Comments Off on Vancouver Chefs Grow Their Own

The Fight to Feed Detroit

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Herbs on sale at Eastern Market in Detroit. (Danielle Walquist Lynch/Flickr)

(3rd in a series) To mend the city’s food system, urban farmers and entrepreneurs are working to funnel fresh produce and artisanal goods to local tables.

By Jessica Leigh Hester
The Atlantic: City Lab
Aug 31, 2016

Excerpt:

These organizations are working to ford considerable chasms in terms of access. Across the transit-strapped city, where nearly one-third of Detroiters don’t own a vehicle, many residents have a hard time reliably procuring nutritious produce. County-wide, nearly 23 percent of residents are estimated to be food insecure. Research from the National Poverty Center found that in Metro Detroit, food insecurity was exacerbated by the recession and disproportionately affected black families; the effects are particularly pronounced among families with delinquent bills or other debts, found a survey conducted by the University of Michigan.

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September 1, 2016   Comments Off on The Fight to Feed Detroit

Growing Pains for Detroit’s Urban Farms

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Alyssa Trimmer and her partner grow vegetables on lots in Detroit’s Virginia Park neighborhood. (Jessica Leigh Hester/CityLab)

(2nd in series) Agriculture flourishes in the city’s vacant lots—but can it survive the push towards revitalization?

By Jessica Leigh Hester
The Atlantic: City Lab
Aug 30, 2016

Excerpt:

Two years ago, Brittany Bradd, an activist in Detroit’s Brightmoor neighborhood, bought an acre of land that she planned to farm. Ever since, she’s been trying to buy an additional property that remains in limbo. “Some lots are just paperwork in boxes,” she says. Another farmer told me that he plans to visit the Land Bank in person—he wants to leave with a receipt in hand.

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September 1, 2016   Comments Off on Growing Pains for Detroit’s Urban Farms

Detroit’s Urban Growers Are Farming for Their Lives

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Murals testify to the community-minded design of Mark Covington’s farm. (Jessica Leigh Hester/CityLab)

This is the first installment of a three-part series. The second will explore how urban agriculture fits in to the city’s redevelopment plans; the third dives in to putting the harvest to use.

By Jessica Leigh Hester
From The Atlantic
City Lab
Aug 29, 2016

Excerpt:

By selling his produce at markets and to local restaurants, Willerer is able to support his family from his land. He sells about 200 pounds of salad greens each weekend at Eastern Market, one of the country’s oldest produce marts; an 8-oz. bag of his greens goes for $5. His home and farm are insurance policies against another economic tumble.

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August 31, 2016   Comments Off on Detroit’s Urban Growers Are Farming for Their Lives

Saskatoon, Canada: Inner city farming has its advantages

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Lisa Taylor weeds her garden near King George school in Riversdale in Saskatoon on July 6, 2016. (Michelle Berg / Saskatoon StarPhoenix)

A diverse assortment of flowers, vegetables and herbs grow past Lisa Taylor’s fence line, right to the sidewalk of her cozy Riversdale home.

By Michelle Berg
Saskatoon StarPhoenix
August 18, 2016

Excerpt:

“By growing food in the city, people in the community experience firsthand what growing food looks like and the work and energy that goes into their food before it ends up on their plate,” she says.

This year she has started a new business called Biodivercity Farms. She and her husband, Jason Fege, find creative ways to use smaller spaces within the city to grow produce that is boxed up and delivered to 23 customers each week of the growing season.

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August 25, 2016   Comments Off on Saskatoon, Canada: Inner city farming has its advantages

Portland, Oregon’s Urban Agriculture Scene

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City of Portland’s ‘Food’ specialist Steve Cohen who gave them a tour of thriving urban agriculture ventures and community gardens around the City.

By Chef Arthur Gordon and Anya
Irregardless Blog
Aug 16, 2016

Excerpt:

The Ariadne Garden is a double lot located in the heart of NE Portland. Established in 1993, it is now managed by the Oregon Sustainable Agriculture Land Trust. Some of the Portland Ariadne birds eye view healthiest soil in Portland is found here, nurturing the most delicious food available. Ariadne is a self-sustaining retailer, selling its own flowers (peonies, roses, yarrow, lilies, gladiola, zinnias) and produce (tomatoes and starts, lettuces, escaroles, mustards, kales, beans, squash, raspberries, etc.) to those who visit its onsite produce stand.

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August 24, 2016   Comments Off on Portland, Oregon’s Urban Agriculture Scene

Indoor farms give vacant Detroit buildings new life

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Green Collar Foods Operations Director Darren Riley explains the process called aeroponics that mists the bare roots of plants like this kale that grow under fluorescent lights on shelves at the indoor farm. Neighboring Supino Pizzeria buys the company’s kale. Brandy Baker, The Detroit News.

The city is considering regulations that could expand indoor agriculture even more.

By Breana Noble
The Detroit News
August 15, 2016

Excerpt:

The urban agriculture ordinance, however, assumes indoor farming would be large-scale, said city planner Kathryn Underwood. To increase the zoning district, the City Planning Commission sent an amendment to the City Council for consideration that would take into account smaller operations. It is expected to vote on the proposal in the fall.

“(The amendment) recognizes (indoor farming) can happen at very large scales and very small scales,” Underwood said. “It will allow more of it to happen.”

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August 21, 2016   Comments Off on Indoor farms give vacant Detroit buildings new life

Urban Farming is taking root in Baltimore

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Maya Kosok at her flower Farm Hillen homestead. Photo Christopher Myers.

At the heart of the matter is determining what Boyd calls “the highest and best use” of city land. For urban farmers, that is agriculture.

By Amy Mulvihill
Baltimore Magazine
Aug 2016

Excerpt:

In recent years, the city has adopted a suite of regulations to better accommodate farming, everything from rewriting the rules about livestock (bees, miniature goats, rabbits, and chickens are allowed now in limited numbers) to clarifying the building code to permit lightweight, temporary greenhouses called hoop houses. Perhaps most ambitiously, last year the City Council passed an Urban Agriculture Property Tax Credit that provides a 90 percent tax break to farmers who produce $5,000 worth of crops annually. There is also a pending rewrite of the city’s zoning code, which would codify urban agriculture in almost all of Baltimore’s residential zones.

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August 21, 2016   Comments Off on Urban Farming is taking root in Baltimore

An Abandoned Quarry Above Rio’s Olympic Village Found New Life as an Organic Farm

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Fátima Anselmo, owner of Orgânicas da Fátima, grows organic produce in a reclaimed quarry in Rio de Janeiro. Pea vines climb bamboo stakes to her left, while banana leaves spread on the ground behind her protect a bed recently planted with carrot seeds. After finding the site in 2014, she spent more than a year and a half clearing it of rubble and building the soil from her own compost pile. Photo by Andrew Jenner.

“I always wanted to show that urban agriculture was possible,” Anselmo says. “If everyone did just a little bit of this, we’d have much healthier food and a much healthier world.”

By Andrew Jenner
Modern Farmer
August 19, 2016

Excerpt:

Anselmo estimates that restaurants and hotels make up about 70 percent of her business. (The Olympics—great news for any host city’s hospitality industry—have been very good to Orgânicos da Fátima). The rest of her sales take place at the organic farmers markets that have begun popping up all over Rio; a decade ago, there was a single such market in all of Rio, according to ABIO, an organic farmer’s association. Today, there are 19.

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August 20, 2016   Comments Off on An Abandoned Quarry Above Rio’s Olympic Village Found New Life as an Organic Farm

Excerpts from Michael Ableman’s book, ‘Street Farm’ (August 2016)

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A Sole Food urban farm in an old Petro-Canada station in Vancouver’s East End. Photo by Agriculture Urbana.

‘People are no easier to recover than the land buried under layers of pavement.’

By Michael Ableman
Earth Island Journal
Aug 17, 2016

Excerpt:

We interrupt harvesting for one of our farm walks, a chance for me to share some techniques or a little philosophy, answer questions, and tell stories. And I realize that even as I am telling stories to make abundance real and visual for folks who may never have experienced it, I am feeling my own doubts and questions about what lies ahead. It feels odd for me standing in this parking lot on a street corner talking about soil microbes, optimal plant spacing, or the life cycle of an aphid. On my rural farm, not far from here, I’d be carrying on similar conversations, but there I’m mentoring young, well-scrubbed kids fresh out of college, most of whom have never known real hardship, all still hopeful and idealistic, too young for life to have slapped them around.

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August 18, 2016   Comments Off on Excerpts from Michael Ableman’s book, ‘Street Farm’ (August 2016)

Canada: Saskatoon city vegetable farms prove you don’t have to be rural to grow

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Rachel and Jared Regier from Chain Reaction Urban Farm are passionate about sustainability. (Rosalie Woloski/CBC)

The Chain Reaction Urban Farm consists of four city plots including backyards and city boulevards

CBC News
Aug 11, 2016

Excerpt:

Jared and Rachel Regier run the Chain Reaction Urban Farm, which consists of a number of garden plots in backyards and city boulevards.

Organic produce harvested from the plots is then delivered by bicycle to more than 20 families in Saskatoon.

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August 17, 2016   Comments Off on Canada: Saskatoon city vegetable farms prove you don’t have to be rural to grow