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Category — Urban Farm

How Urban Farms Are Changing the Way We Eat

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veggi

“It’s the best basil we’ve ever had, and they’re able to produce it for us year-round,” says John Karangis, the executive chef at Union Square Events

By Lisa Elaine Held
Eater
Apr 12, 2016

Excerpt:

In each of its markets, BrightFarms has partnered with major chains, like Giant and Acme, and the produce often hits shelves within 24 hours of being picked, a fact that means it’s almost guaranteed to be longer-lasting than other greens. “I want to help people eat healthier food, and making it flavorful and delicious is a big part of that,” Lightfoot says.

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April 17, 2016   Comments Off on How Urban Farms Are Changing the Way We Eat

Real Estate Brokerage Firm Names the Top 10 U.S. Cities for Urban Farming

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10topEugene, OR, Burlington, VT, Santa Rosa, CA, Greenville, SC, Orlando, FL, San Francisco, CA, Albuquerque, NM, Columbia, SC, Tampa, FL, Raleigh-Durham, NC.

Ranking Based on Number of Homes Listed for Sale in 2015 with Gardens, Greenhouses or Chicken Coops

By Christin Camacho
Business Wire
Apr 13, 2016
(Must see. Mike)

Excerpt:

Eugene topped the list, with 20.5 percent of all home listings containing at least one keyword.

“It’s not uncommon for homeowners in Oregon to have chickens or honey bees,” said Matthew Brennan, a Redfin real estate agent in Portland. “The city of Portland allows homeowners to keep up to three animals, including chickens, ducks, doves, pigeons, pygmy goats and rabbits, without permits. Oregonians have a hankering for that sustainable lifestyle and Eugene is more affordable and has more space than Portland.”

The City of Eugene, like Portland, has played a big role in facilitating urban agriculture by allowing residents to keep more animals, like chickens and goats, on their property.

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April 14, 2016   Comments Off on Real Estate Brokerage Firm Names the Top 10 U.S. Cities for Urban Farming

The executive director of the Vancouver Urban Farming Society talks about this emerging sector

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marcMarcela Crowe, at an urban farm at 57th and Cambie, said the Vancouver Urban Farming Society’s mandate is to grow the sector through education, advocacy, business support and networking. Photo Dan Toulgoet.

On the Record with Marcela Crowe: In 2013, urban farmers sold about $418,000 worth of produce to residents.

By Naoibh O’Connor
Vancouver Courier
April 12, 2016

Excerpt:

What does urban farming look like in Vancouver right now?
The data needs to be updated. We don’t have any data for 2016 or even 2015. But we do have data from 2013. That was the last time a large census of urban farms in Vancouver took place. This will have changed, but there are approximately 14 urban farms in Vancouver. The largest one [Sole Food Street Farms] has about four acres of land. [That goes] all the way to maybe a handful of backyard farms totalling 5,000 square feet. There’s really that variety in terms of scale. In 2013, urban farmers sold about $418,000 worth of produce to residents. The farms are located throughout the city. They’re in the Downtown Eastside, they’re in Mount Pleasant, they’re in the east end and they’re in the West Side, Kitsilano area.

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April 13, 2016   Comments Off on The executive director of the Vancouver Urban Farming Society talks about this emerging sector

City Farmer’s Head Gardener, Sharon Slack, Makes Vancouver Newspaper Frontpage Twice in 6 weeks

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SharonFrontVancSun
Sharon Slack, 73, says she prefers working at City Farmer in Kisilano to the typical retirement ‘image’ sold in advertisements. Photo by Arlen Redekop.

“Unretired seniors are working overtime”

By Denise Ryan
The Vancouver Sun
April 8, 2016

Except:

Sharon Slack, 73, head gardener at City Farmer in Kitsilano, said she finds the traditional idea of retirement preposterous.

“The whole image they sell you about retirement — all those TV ads that say: Retire! Do all the things you want to do! Travel! Entertain! Good grief,” she said. “I didn’t do that when I was young. Why in the world would I do it now?”

Slack loves her job, but work isn’t just a pleasure — it’s also a practical matter, she said.

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April 8, 2016   Comments Off on City Farmer’s Head Gardener, Sharon Slack, Makes Vancouver Newspaper Frontpage Twice in 6 weeks

A Mobile Farm on Wheels to Survive an Edmonton Winter

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wheelsClick on image for larger file.

A mobile farm and training centre that enables teachers and students to practice urban agriculture

Prairie Urban Farm is launching a crowdfunding campaign to build a mobile Farm on Wheels. Designed to be part farm and part training facility, the 40-foot shipping container will house an innovative farm built tough enough to survive an Edmonton winter.

Located at the University of Alberta South Campus, Prairie Urban Farm is a one-acre demonstration farm that has been working with Edmonton communities to grow fresh produce, build a community of urban farmers, and provide awareness and skill-building in sustainable agriculture and food systems.

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March 30, 2016   Comments Off on A Mobile Farm on Wheels to Survive an Edmonton Winter

Women urban farmers in Portland are part of a national trend

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leah
Rockwood Urban Farm, owned by Leah Rodgers, is located in East Portland among apartments, home, a hot-rod garage, an air conditioning shop and the rush of urban traffic.

Young women today, especially in Portland, are increasingly channeling their activism into farming as a way to advance the food movement.

By Jennifer Anderson
Portland Tribune
Mar 15, 2016

Excerpt:

Leah Rodgers isn’t a typical farmer, and her farm isn’t a typical farm. For one, Rodgers is a 37-year-old woman; most U.S. farmers are men, and their average age is 57.

For another, her 1-acre lot is smack-dab in the middle of East Portland, near David Douglas High School — next to homes, a hot-rod garage, an air-conditioning shop, and the rush of traffic on Southeast Stark Street. Her operation, Rockwood Urban Farm, is a hyperlocal CSA farm, which stands for community-supported agriculture, selling its produce largely to neighbors and restaurants.

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March 19, 2016   Comments Off on Women urban farmers in Portland are part of a national trend

Victoria, BC, urban famers targeting production of 100,000 pounds in the city

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times
Chris Hildreth, CEO of Topsoil, and Ally Dewji, development manager at Dockside Green, among rows of planters. Photograph By BRUCE STOTESBURY, Times Colonist.

“My goal is to really take over as many vacant areas as we can in the city, produce as much food as possible only a couple of blocks away from the restaurants we are supplying,” Hildreth said.

By Carla Wilson
Times Colonist
March 12, 2016

Excerpt:

Urban farmer Chris Hildreth is setting out 2,400 pots on vacant land at Dockside Green to supply three nearby restaurants with a range of freshly picked produce in the coming months.

He’ll be planting soon, hoping to begin delivering food late next month and carry on through to winter. “My focus is cities and I think that cities need to become more sustainable,” Hildreth, CEO of Topsoil, said Friday.

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March 15, 2016   Comments Off on Victoria, BC, urban famers targeting production of 100,000 pounds in the city

Leila Trickey: Portrait of an urban farmer in Burnaby, BC

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LielLeila Trickey grew up on a farm in Ontario. She spent her childhood roaming wide open spaces. Decades later, she runs an urban farm with her partner in Burnaby’s Big Bend area.

Everything grows well in our garden, because it used to be a chicken farm, so the soil is really rich from the chicken poo.

By Jennifer Moreau
Burnaby Now
March 10, 2016

Excerpt:

You could say farming is in Leila Trickey’s genes. Her homesteader parents and five siblings lived on an Ontario farm, and her childhood was shaped by wide open spaces and fresh earth. When Trickey grew up, she moved to more urban pastures, but she still felt a nostalgia for the land.

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March 11, 2016   Comments Off on Leila Trickey: Portrait of an urban farmer in Burnaby, BC

New Vancouver, BC, bylaws will regulate urban farmers

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smak
Small-scale farms have sprung up around the region, boosted by community agriculture programs that allow farmers to sell crops in advance.

Intention is to encourage growth of farming, not inhibit it, city says

By Matthew Robinson
Vancouver Sun
February 25, 2016

Excerpt:

Camil Dumont, the head farmer at Inner City Farms said the proposed regulations could help standardize the industry.

“I think most of the people in the community that do urban food production are pretty on the ball, but it only takes one group to do something untoward for everyone to feel the brunt of it. From that perspective, I think it’s pretty good. It gives us a bit of a safety net,” he said.

“The fear is that it’s going to restrict the community from growing as much food as possible. … I want urban farming to be a vibrant and healthy part of our city and hopefully this is something that helps.”

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February 27, 2016   Comments Off on New Vancouver, BC, bylaws will regulate urban farmers

Urban Farmer Brooke Salvaggio Reflects On Kansas City’s Organic Scene

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serpg
Farmer Brooke Salvaggio holds one of her chickens at Urbavore Urban Farm. Photo by Julie Denesha/Kcur.

According to Salvaggio, the “buy/eat local” sentiment is a trend — one that’s on the decline.

By Jen Chen
KCUR 89.3
Feb 12, 2016

Excerpt:

Salvaggio runs the Badseed Farmers Market, which she is closing Feb. 26. She also produces fruits, vegetables and eggs at Urbavore Urban Farm, her 13.5 acre farm on the east side of Kansas City.

Her journey from surburbia to living off the land started during her teenage years.

She was a self-described jaded teen, a party girl who did everything under the sun. She was unhappy, but she didn’t know why.

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February 20, 2016   Comments Off on Urban Farmer Brooke Salvaggio Reflects On Kansas City’s Organic Scene

1.2-hectare McQuesten Urban Farm in Hamilton, Ontario

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hami
McQueston Urban farm on land owned by City Housing Hamilton.

Merulla says McQuesten is one of the largest urban farms in Canada.

Sam Merulla this year, asking about funding for a full-time, full-fledged farmer.

Reid says professional guidance is important to help the farm get properly started on its first full season. The 1.2-hectare farm is located behind St. Helen early learning and child-care centre on Britannia Avenue, near Barton Street East and Red Hill Valley Parkway. The “farm” was established last year after councillors approved a $350,000 construction job to break ground on the property.

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February 13, 2016   Comments Off on 1.2-hectare McQuesten Urban Farm in Hamilton, Ontario

Silent meditation used to halt construction at the Gill Tract a second time in Albany, California

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med

Occupy The Farm uses a broad spectrum of tactics, including direct action, to reclaim and expand the commons for sustainable farming and community education

By Occupy the Farm
Press Release
Feb 8th, 2016

Excerpt:

Community members, students, and UC faculty have put forth an alternative proposal to use all twenty acres of the historic Gill Tract as a Center for Urban Agriculture and Food Justice, serving the University of California’s mission of research and education for the public good, while also operating as a productive urban farm that provides students, workers, and community members with access to affordable local produce. This proposal better aligns with UC President Napolitano’s Global Food Initiative as well as the sustainability and climate mitigation policies of the state of California.

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February 12, 2016   Comments Off on Silent meditation used to halt construction at the Gill Tract a second time in Albany, California

Vancouver city requirements curb urban farming enthusiasm

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cityv

Yet if Vancouver policies support urban farming, bylaws and regulations are another matter.

By Peter Mitham
Business Vancouver
Feb. 9, 2016

Excerpt:

City staff confirmed that council is set to receive and consider a new policy by month’s end “to support and better enable urban farming,” but it will be limited to recommendations; bylaws and an actual business licence legitimating urban farms remain some ways off.

Staff also declined to address other issues facing urban farms, such as compliance with civic zoning and fire code.

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February 10, 2016   Comments Off on Vancouver city requirements curb urban farming enthusiasm

Richmond, Virginia: ‘So much is happening in urban agriculture in the city and region’

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bap
Produce from the 31st Street Baptist Church urban farm helps provide fresh vegetables to the homeless and hungry to whom it serves daily hot lunches. Photo courtesy of Linda Marshall.

Talk about urban farming in Richmond and the 31st Street Baptist church is a good place to start.

By Tina Griego
Richmond Magazine
Jan 31, 2016

Excerpt:

Pastor Henderson put two-and-two together and said to his congregation: “It’d be a shame to obtain this land and do nothing with it for a couple years. Let’s create a garden.”

He turned to Mrs. Pearcie, a congregant possessed of a green thumb so mighty, the pastor could only marvel.

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February 7, 2016   Comments Off on Richmond, Virginia: ‘So much is happening in urban agriculture in the city and region’

Stephenville, Texas – Half-acre: The urban farm next door

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hrbn
Milton Horner hangin’ out with his goat buddies on the family’s urban farm behind their house in Stephenville.

“We had 21 squash plants, got about 200 cantaloupe, and we had watermelon, 40 tomato plants, and three rows of 60 okra plants,” Woodrow says.

By J. Michael Ross
Stephenville Empire-Tribune
Jan 29, 2016

Excerpt:

Asked to tell us about the family’s urban farming and beekeeping, Woodrow replies, “I think people would be amazed by what we get out of a one-half-acre urban farm. We have bees, goats, chickens, ducks, a vegetable garden, several kinds of fruit trees – peaches and pears ? and six pecan trees.”

Everything on the Horner Urban Farm is eco-friendly and efficient. Witness the 2,500-gallon rain-water collection system and drip lines running to various parts of the growing spaces.

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February 4, 2016   Comments Off on Stephenville, Texas – Half-acre: The urban farm next door